Welcome! Please use the navigational links on your left to explore our website.

Company Logo Shop Now
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 
Marketplace
Classified Ads
Photo Ads
Tractor Parts

Community
Discussion Forums
Project Journals
Tractor Town
Your Stories
Show & Pull Guide
Events Calendar
Hauling Schedule

Galleries
Tractor Photos
Implement Photos
Vintage Photos
Help Identify
Parts & Pieces
Stuck & Troubled
Vintage Ads
Community Album
Photo Ad Archives

Research & Info
Articles
Tractor Registry
Tip of the Day
Safety Cartoons
Tractor Values
Serial Numbers
Tune-Up Guide
Paint Codes
List Prices
Production Nbrs
Tune-Up Specs
Torque Values
3-Point Specs
Glossary

Miscellaneous
Tractor Games
Just For Kids
Virtual Show
Museum Guide
Memorial Page
Feedback Form

Yesterday's Tractors Facebook Page

Related Sites
Tractor Shed
TractorLinks.com
Ford 8N/9N Club
Today's Tractors
Garden Tractors
Kountry Life
  
Discussion Forum

"Swinging" drawbar

Welcome Guest, Log in or Register
Author 
Craig Duff

04-27-1998 12:55:32




Report to Moderator

Having my first experiences with an old Farmall, what were the advantages of the swinging drawbar? I have a hard enough time manuvering mine backwards hooked to the regular drawbar. Any insight into the intended function of this would be great. Thanks everyone!




[Log in to Reply]   [No Email]
John Healey

04-28-1998 17:44:59




Report to Moderator
 Re: "Swinging" drawbar in reply to Craig Duff, 04-27-1998 12:55:32  
The following is from a Farmall owners manual. " The swinging drawbar is free to swing the full width of the regular drawber, making it easier to turn the tractor under load whan pulling trail-behind implements like disc harrows. It also facilitates steering on the straightaway when the tractor is pulling a very heavy load. The load exerts less sideways pull on the tractor and therefore interfers less with the steering. This attachment is especially desireable when working in small, irregular shaped fields" Hope this helps , John

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
john d

04-27-1998 14:11:25




Report to Moderator
 Re: "Swinging" drawbar in reply to Craig Duff, 04-27-1998 12:55:32  
: Having my first experiences with an old Farmall, what were the advantages of the swinging drawbar? I have a hard enough time manuvering mine backwards hooked to the regular drawbar. Any insight into the intended function of this would be great. Thanks everyone!


Well...... to begin with, they weren't meant for use in reverse. If you have to back up with anything attached, drop a pin in the holes on each side to keep it from floating. That will help greatly, and you will find that it's easier to back loads this way than when hitched to the standard drawbar. You might even want to weld up a "double pin" with a bracket that will fit over the top of the swinging drawbar. There are a few advantages to these things under some conditions. When the tractor turns, the swinging drawbar moves closer to the rear wheel on the inside of the turn, making the load easier to pull. Under conditions of poor traction, or with a tractor that is a little underpowered for the load, this can make a tremendous difference. I can remember a situation where I had to spend about half a day using a 300 Utility to pull a big disk that we generally hooked to a Super M. That tractor was marginal for serious field work anyway,
and the only way to keep moving when turning was to lift the disk or let it "float" on the swinging drawbar. It's important to remember that this drawbar also lets the hitch of whatever you are pulling get a LOT closer to the rear wheel when turning. This can become VERY dangerous VERY quickly. There are also times when swinging that drawbar to the side can make it much easier to hitch to loads, or to pull loads off-center. An example would be pulling a hopper-bottom wagon up to a grain elevator dump. Sometimes PTO-driven equipment lines up and works better when hitched a few inches behind the regular drawbar on one of these. The universal joint on the pto shaft needs to be approximately straight above the hole where the load is hitched, letting them pivot on nearly the same axis. One other thing to keep in mind is that many of these old farmalls are capable of pulling much greater loads than were commonly attached to them back in the 40's and early 50's. The mount at the front of the swinging drawbar is rugged, but NOT indestructible. There have been cases of breaking these when hitched to extreme loads on rough ground. If you're pulling heavy loads under rough field conditions, get one of those heavy steel drawbar extension plates and bolt in in place.
Good luck!

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Sidney

04-27-1998 14:05:53




Report to Moderator
 Re: "Swinging" drawbar in reply to Craig Duff, 04-27-1998 12:55:32  
: Having my first experiences with an old Farmall, what were the advantages of the swinging drawbar? I have a hard enough time manuvering mine backwards hooked to the regular drawbar. Any insight into the intended function of this would be great. Thanks everyone!

One bad thing about them if you are hauling a spreader or something that puts a lot of weight on the hitch, it could break like it me twice even after the first time it was welded and braced with extra steel peice.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
new york sam

04-27-1998 13:35:53




Report to Moderator
 Re: "Swinging" drawbar in reply to Craig Duff, 04-27-1998 12:55:32  
: Having my first experiences with an old Farmall, what were the advantages of the swinging drawbar? I have a hard enough time manuvering mine backwards hooked to the regular drawbar. Any insight into the intended function of this would be great. Thanks everyone!


the ONLY time we let the drawbar swing free was while pulling a set of drags--
besides very hard to control it would be dangerous
to let it swing any other time-

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Dave Kolbenschlag

04-27-1998 13:33:55




Report to Moderator
 Re: "Swinging" drawbar in reply to Craig Duff, 04-27-1998 12:55:32  
: Having my first experiences with an old Farmall, what were the advantages of the swinging drawbar? I have a hard enough time manuvering mine backwards hooked to the regular drawbar. Any insight into the intended function of this would be great. Thanks everyone!

Craig,
If you were doing soil preparation such as disking, harrowing etc
and dragging unmounted implements you want the drawbar to swing for ease in tight corners. Some pull implements also reguired and off-set to the drawbar so you could lock it right or left of center.
Basically the swinging allows tighter corners before the implement rides up on the rear tire.

Dave

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
[Options]  [Printer Friendly]  [Posting Help]  [Return to Forum]   [Log in to Reply]

Hop to:


TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). We have the parts you need to repair your tractor - the right parts. Our fast shipping, low prices and years of research make us your best choice when you need parts. Shop Online Today. [ About Us ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2019 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters

Website Accessibility Policy