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Tool Talk Discussion Forum

Floor Drain in New Building?

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Joe in Ne

10-31-2006 21:48:48




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I"m getting ready to put my concrete in my new building and am trying to find a floor drain to put in it. I would like one that is a foot wide and at least 4 ft long. Am having a hard time finding one. Any Ideas?




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Aberdale Farm

11-01-2006 19:25:34




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
I just built a 40x60 shop this summer and was going through the same thought process. I even had a two 2x2x2 catch basin already speced out and in the plans. At the last minute, I decided to scrap the catch basins and floor drain and sloped the floor towards the doors. I"m really glad I did for several reasons. A floor drain allows cold air (and mice)to enter the space, if heated. A floor drain requires maintenance and cleaning on a periodic basis. Emptying a floor drain is often considered hazardous waste, which I just don"t want to deal with. And having the floor slope to the center makes it tough to use a creeper or a splitting stand.

With the floor sloped toward the door, the overall floor is even, and there is no air leakage. It"s easier to hose out the floor and scoop up the crud with a shovel outside on the apron, than to scoop it out of a concrete box. You can do whatever you like, but I just wanted to share my experience.

Oh yeah, I also saved $800 by deleting the two catch basins and the tile.

Dale

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Aberdale Farm

11-01-2006 19:15:20




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
I just built a 40x60 shop this summer and was going through the same thought process. I even had a two 2x2x2 catch basin already speced out and in the plans. At the last minute, I decided to scrap the catch basins and floor drain and sloped the floor towards the doors. I"m really glad I did for several reasons. A floor drain allows cold air (and mice)to enter the space, if heated. A floor drain requires maintenance and cleaning on a periodic basis. Emptying a floor drain is often considered hazardous waste, which I just don"t want to deal with. And having the floor slope to the center makes it tough to use a creeper or a splitting stand.

With the floor sloped toward the door, the overall floor is even, and there is no air leakage. It"s easier to hose out the floor and scoop up the crud with a shovel outside on the apron, than to scoop it out of a concrete box. You can do whatever you like, but I just wanted to share my experience.

Oh yeah, I also saved $800 by deleting the two catch basins and the tile.

Dale

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Bill in NorthCentral PA

11-01-2006 18:54:18




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
Place your drain up through the ground. Pour a cap of concrete for the floor of the drain around this pipe. Form and pour the walls of the drain with the floor pour. I put blocking at the top to create a lip allow for 1-1/2" thick used bridge decking. When you pour the floor, screed from the edges to the drain. Cut the drain pipe up about three inches. No slope on bottom. When the debris gets 2-1/2" thick, lift off the grates and shovel into the trash.

Works well for me.

Bill

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Stumpalump

11-01-2006 13:05:41




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
Check code for floor drains. The are not legal in places like garages anymore.



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Joe in Ne

11-01-2006 17:39:25




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Stumpalump, 11-01-2006 13:05:41  
My wife the EPA inspector just brought me a bunch of stuff home and basically it says any residue caught by a floor drain has to be tested before disposal of any kind and could possibly be hazardous waste. No dry wells allowed. Has to be drained to a tank and the tank has to be tested and pumped. This is for everyone even just farmers. So now what???



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Stumpalump

11-02-2006 17:40:21




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 11-01-2006 17:39:25  
Put your floor drain in 2 inches deeper than your floor. Stuff a rag in the pipe and then cover it with card board. Tell any body that askes that you changed your mind about the drain and you are going to cover it up with concrete.
When the building is done go back to the spot and bust out the 2" of concrete. Ya know like when they repeal that rule or somthing.



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Joe in Ne

11-01-2006 10:42:18




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
I have been looking at a trench drain that"s what I was thinking of anyway. One that I could stick a shovel in and dig it out when needed. I was only planning half inch slope in 20 ft though. My concrete guy mentioned running it to door and just crack door and let out. I was concerned about Ice on that one outside my door. I thought about a trench drain either inside or outside the door going cross ways. Now I have researched it more and I see they are trying to make it illegal to have floor drains in buildings for enviromental contamination reasons. Now my problem here is that my wife is an EPA inspector and I would probably get "Busted". I am not sure about having my concrete going to door so my dilema is which way should I go now.

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135 Fan

11-01-2006 11:08:41




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 11-01-2006 10:42:18  
Maybe you could use a sump pump basin. They are thick plastic and can be set in concrete. You could make a heavier cover out of grating or checker plate with holes in it. When it got full you could pump it out into a holding tank. And then take the tank or have it pumped by a sewer truck. Just a suggestion. Dave



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BillyinStoughton

11-01-2006 07:58:11




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
What you are speaking of is called trench drain, and is available in different lengths. It is designed to pitch to one end or towards the center where your drain pipe will hook up. It's available at any plumbing wholesaler...just pick up the phone. It's what I've got in my shop and wouldn't have it any other way.

Good luck!

Billy



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Farmall Don

11-01-2006 05:52:39




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
Try the Neenah Foundry online Catalog at http://www.NFCO.com They will ship right to you.



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MarkB_MI

11-01-2006 02:41:02




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
For my floor drain I made a plug form and poured the concrete around it. My drain is about 1 ft x 2 ft. I will weld up a grate for it, just haven't got around to it.



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VADAVE

11-01-2006 05:46:12




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to MarkB_MI, 11-01-2006 02:41:02  
Did the same thing. Formed up a drain about 8 foot long, 12 to 18 inches wide and 6 inches deep. Formed a 1 1/2 inch ledge into the sides. Then just go to a surplus steel place and get old grates that were used in sidewalks. As long as the width of the drain isn't too wide the 1 1/2 inch grate works fine.



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george md

10-31-2006 23:06:23




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 10-31-2006 21:48:48  
Joe,

I'm not sure what you are up to but it sounds like you are doing a 4 way slope with a center drain. If so DON"T do it if you are ever going to have a floor jack . A slope of 1/2 inch in 10 ft toward the door with a drain ( grate )INSIDE the door would be many times better .

george



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Hal/WA

11-01-2006 17:38:38




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to george md, 10-31-2006 23:06:23  
I really like the floor drain that I put in the center of my garage, with a slight slope from all 4 ways. It drains to the foundation drainage system and has a sump that catches most of the sediment for easy cleanout rather than letting it go down the pipe.

I have never had any problems using the floor jacks on that floor. The slope is very slight, but works fine to get rid of the moisture from snow falling off the vehicles in the winter.

Having the drain at or near the big door wouldn't work nearly as well for my location. I am sure that the sump would just fill up with ice near the door, and then not drain. In the center of the slab, it has never had much trouble with freezing. I have actually washed my car inside the garage a few times, but seldom do it, because it makes too much moisture in the usually unheated building.

If I ever build another garage or shop with a concrete floor, it will definitely have some kind of a floor drain. I believe it is money and time well spent to go to the extra trouble to do this when you are putting in the floor. It doesn't have to be horribly elaborate, just someplace for the water to go and drain in the lowest spot of the floor. Good luck!

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Joe in Ne

11-01-2006 17:45:22




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Hal/WA, 11-01-2006 17:38:38  
Hal//Wa This material my wife brought home says that all floor drains that don't drain in a city sewer system and that also have oil water separator systems built in are illegal after Jan 2007 and have to be filled or plugged. Now being that my Wife is a EPA inspector I am allready busted if I put this sytem in. So I was trying to think of allternative. I was thinking of sloping floor to door and puttin a trench drain outside door and using door to block any spills as far as legality. I have employees so I'm sure I have to do it right.

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Hal/WA

11-02-2006 18:02:33




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 11-01-2006 17:45:22  
I think the closest city sewer is about 7 or 8 miles from my garage, since I live out in the country. I think that draining to the perimiter drain system was a pretty good idea. Of course I put my system in about 10 years ago. I suppose a little oil could go down the drainage system I have, but there really isn't much, since I clean up any oil spills on the floor.

I would be concerned about the drainage system being an easy entry point for mice or other vermin if it drains to the surface and is open. And draining to the door area around here wouldn't work very well here for about 4 months of the year, at least some years. I could forsee the overhead door freezing down badly if the drainage system didn't drain because of freezing and a puddle developed under the door.

You have my condolences if your wife is with the EPA. My slight experience with those folks was not good....they seemed like total bureaucratic zealots with no sense of humor or concept of practicality. Although there certainly was and is some need for regulation of pollution, I think the government has gone way too far in sticking their noses into private property rights. They need to deal with large scale problems and leave the little guy alone. I vote against people who claim to be "strong environmentalists".

In your situation, you are probably stuck. Good luck in dealing with the bureaucrats and regulators. But I still like my solution to the problem and don't think I am measurably hurting anything now or for the future owners of my property.

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Joe in Ne

11-02-2006 19:21:54




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Hal/WA, 11-02-2006 18:02:33  
Hal/Wa You Said a mouthfull. I couldn't agree with you more. She came home tonight and said whatever I do don't put in a floordrain as they are going to start looking at them. So Plan B!!!



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george md

11-01-2006 19:16:28




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 Re: Floor Drain in New Building? in reply to Joe in Ne, 11-01-2006 17:45:22  
Joe ,

Put the drain inside the door, otherwise

any water running out the door will freeze the

door shut in the winter.

And for those that think 4 way slopes are

great , you must like chasing sockets to the

middle of the slope every time you drop one .

george



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