Welcome! Please use the navigational links on your left to explore our website.

Company Logo Shop Now
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 
Marketplace
Classified Ads
Photo Ads
Tractor Parts

Community
Discussion Forums
Project Journals
Tractor Town
Your Stories
Show & Pull Guide
Events Calendar
Hauling Schedule

Galleries
Tractor Photos
Implement Photos
Vintage Photos
Help Identify
Parts & Pieces
Stuck & Troubled
Vintage Ads
Community Album
Photo Ad Archives

Research & Info
Articles
Tractor Registry
Tip of the Day
Safety Cartoons
Tractor Values
Serial Numbers
Tune-Up Guide
Paint Codes
List Prices
Production Nbrs
Tune-Up Specs
Torque Values
3-Point Specs
Glossary

Miscellaneous
Tractor Games
Just For Kids
Virtual Show
Museum Guide
Memorial Page
Feedback Form

Yesterday's Tractors Facebook Page

Related Sites
Tractor Shed
TractorLinks.com
Ford 8N/9N Club
Today's Tractors
Garden Tractors
Kountry Life
  
Antique Tractor Paint and Bodywork

Acetone for paint thinner

Welcome Guest, Log in or Register
Author 
SteveTx

01-23-2005 07:50:35




Report to Moderator

I just bought a HVLP gun from Lowes and I'am trying to learn how to use it. I'am wanting to paint a p/u Headache rack to sell so I want the finnish to look good. I picked up a quart of Professional oil base Rust-o-leum gloss black paint. It says on the can to use a maxium of 15% acetone for spraying. I've tried twice and used about 10% acetone and I get a lot of orange peel and a ruff texture. Should I go ahead and mix it 15% acetone or is thier a better thinner? It says on the can not to thin with lacquer thinner, turpintine, gasoline etc. I was thinking of using mineral spirits. This is my first experience with air sprayers, so I'am just learning how to use one. I appreciate any help. Thanks

[Log in to Reply]   [No Email]
Ben Dolegowski

10-13-2006 13:23:34




Report to Moderator
 Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 07:50:35  
Steve,
I read all the follow ups on this subject and found it all very interesting and informative. I am also considering using the Rustoleum product to paint an "off-road" vehicle. I'm planning on using the John Deere yellow.
I am also planning on spraying the vehicle (1990 Suzuki Samurai) I have a conventional spray gun as well as an HVLP gun. Not sure which would be better, although I hear there is less overspray with the latter.
Anyway I was wondering how you made out as it is over a year later??

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
SteveTX

01-24-2005 19:54:38




Report to Moderator
 Thanks in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 07:50:35  
Thanks Rod,CNKS, and dr.sportster. You given me a lot of help and useful information. I feel the same way about the Rustoleum. I talked to a professional here in town today thats going to help set me up with better qauilty automotive paint and primmer, so thats good news today. I'am going to print all this out and keep it. Like I said before I really appreciate all the help and hope some day I can repay the favor. Thanks and take care.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
SteveTx

01-24-2005 19:52:55




Report to Moderator
 Thanks in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 07:50:35  
Thanks Rod,CNKS, and dr.sportster. You given me a lot of help and useful information. I feel the same way about the Rustoleum. I talked to a professional here in town today thats going to help set me up with better qauilty automotive paint and primmer, so thats good news today. I'am going to print all this out and keep it. Like I said before I really appreciate all the help and hope some day I can repay the favor. Thanks and take care.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
CNKS

01-23-2005 19:28:26




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 07:50:35  
The simplist thing for you to do is buy a quart of "inexpensive" automotive acrylic (not synthetic) enamel, such as Rod suggested. Get the recommended reducer, and prime with epoxy primer first. It will cost you substantilly more, but that type of paint is almost fool proof, as long as you follow the spec sheet -- be sure you get the sheet, the dealer should supply it or they can be found on the manfacturers web site. I wouldn't mess with hardware store stuff, unless you are painting a house. If you use hardeners you will have to purchase more protective equipment (supplied air) than you are likely willing to purchase right now.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
dr.sportster

01-23-2005 11:46:56




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 07:50:35  
Forget what I just said. I dont want you to think i was calling you wacky.But before you go any further Rust oleum black will not get that glossy I had some experience.It looks sort of greyish and the sun affected it sooner than expected.It seemed to be a bad choice.It was like it was a weak black.You might want an auto color.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
dr.sportster

01-23-2005 11:32:06




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 07:50:35  
Look Im no pro painter but how do guys think of wacky stuff like this.just get the thinners of the manufacturer. As amatuers[me]Ill get all the same brand crap because I dont know much about troubleshooting when things go wrong and want to minimize that possibility.Part of that is to sell you all Dupont PPg or whatever.For a once in awhile painter Ill get all one brand product.On a can top it says use top grade thinner.Now professional guys will tell you the real deal thats just what Id do And did.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Rod (NH)

01-23-2005 10:34:21




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 07:50:35  
Hi Steve,

Acetone is becoming more and more prevalent as a paint thinner or thinner component because of increased air emission regulations (VOCs). It is a solvent that is exempt from regulations. Don't ask me why it's exempt. I'd like to know myself. Rustoleum products used to have their own proprietary "thinning oils" and cautioned not to use anything else. I am not a fan of Rustoleum for spraying so I have no experience in "experimenting" with it. The best I can recommend is to follow the label instructions. Anything else is somewhat of a crap shoot unless you can find someone else who has done successfull experimenting with the exact same components.

Acetone is a fast evaporating solvent so you might try uping it to the recommended maximum 15% ratio. Also review this regarding orange peel, courtesy of Martin Senour:

*******************
ORANGE PEEL
( Poor Flow, Texture)
Paint film having an uneven texture that resembles the skin of an orange.

CAUSE
(A) Under reduction and/or air pressure too low.
(B) Thinner/reducer evaporates too fast for spray conditions.
(C) Excessive film thickness or piling on of heavy wet coats.
(D) Improper spray gun set-up.
(E) Improper painting technique.

REPAIR
(1) Compound or polish to reduce surface texture.
(2) Or, sand smooth with 1200 or finer grit sandpaper, compound and polish to restore gloss.
(3) Or, sand smooth and refinish.

PREVENTION
(A) Use proper reduction ratio and spray at recommended air pressure.
(B) Select recommended thinner/reducer based on temperature, humidity, air movement, and size of repair.
(C) Avoid heavy coats and excessive film thickness.
(D) Use recommended spray gun, fluid tip and air cap for the material being sprayed. Always adjust the gun for best atomization and balanced spray pattern before paint application.
(E) During paint application, hold the gun perpendicular and parallel to the surface. Adjust speed of pass, pattern overlap, and distance from the panel to achieve the desired appearance.

****************
Be sure to check the air pressure directly at the inlet to your gun. Install a pressure gage right at the inlet as shown below and check the pressure with the trigger pulled. Make sure the fan pattern adjustment screw is wide open and the fluid control adjustment screw is also wide open. There does not have to be any paint in the gun to do this. Set the pressure using whatever regulator you have back at your compressor. Never mind the pressure at the regulator. It's the pressure right at the gun inlet that counts. An HVLP gun should have the "maximum" pressure indicated on the handle or in the instructions that came with it. It typically will be about 30 psig but could be anything from 15 to 50 psig. Set the pressure at least to that number. If that doesn't do the trick try going 5 or 10 psig higher (if you are not regulated by some law in your area) to get a little better atomization.

If you still can't get it to work well, I'd look at using a different paint.

third party image
third party image Rod

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
SteveTx

01-23-2005 12:29:58




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to Rod (NH), 01-23-2005 10:34:21  
Thanks dr. sportster and Rod.
I knew Rustoleum wasn't the best paint but I didn't want to learn and pratice with expensive paint. I new from the start that I wasn't going to buy a cheaper HVLP gun and paint like a professional and get better without pratice and getting knowledge of how it all works. I did talk to a couple of painters but didn't get much help. The information you 2 gave me is a lot of help so I'am going to print it out. I appreciate the time you've took and the information and since it's going to be too cold for a few days to paint I can keep studying. What kind of brand of primmer and paint and thinner do you all recommend. I just don't have any experince with any of this stuff other than spray paint. Thanks again.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
dr.sportster

01-24-2005 13:48:04




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 12:29:58  
Steve,maybe it was good I warned you about rustoleum paint but other than that I really dont know what im talking about.I have decided not to post anything on the paint and body work section.Guys like CNKS and Rod will tell you the right thing.An average worker works about 2500 hrs a year as an amatuer you cant compete with that.2 cars,several bikes and a tractor dosent make you an expertPainter.I hung out at the body shop but that wont help much either.Even went to the trade show.Im still spraying the same can of black diamond laquer from ten tears ago and didnt even spell it right.See you at Tool talk.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
SteveTX

01-24-2005 19:35:12




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to dr.sportster, 01-24-2005 13:48:04  
dr.sportster, I really respect your input and opinnions on the subject. You've probally learned more hanging out around body shops than I'll ever know. Really I didn't take any offense to your post at all. I even laughed at the wacky part. Thanks again for your help. Take care



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
SteveTX

01-24-2005 19:34:17




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to dr.sportster, 01-24-2005 13:48:04  
dr.sportster, I really respect your input and opinnions on the subject. You've probally learned more hanging out around body shops than I'll ever know. Really I didn't take any offense to your post at all. I even laughed at the wacky part. Thanks again for your help. Take care



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
dr.sportster

01-25-2005 13:22:09




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTX, 01-24-2005 19:34:17  
Steve,At first I could not remember if my buddy and I thinned the rustoleum.So I called him and he reminded me.We did not use thinner.We took four spray cans let the gas out opened em with a beer can opener and poured em in the spraygun.Now that is wacky.No wonder.{but its still bad paint]I probably had two cans of quality black.I dont know why we thought that to be a good idea.[Amatuers]



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Rod (NH)

01-23-2005 18:46:50




Report to Moderator
 Re: Acetone for paint thinner in reply to SteveTx, 01-23-2005 12:29:58  
Steve,

Good for you. The absolute best way to learn and get confidence in spray painting is to PRACTICE. It is the rare individual that can turn out good work the first time, no matter the cost of equipment equipment or the brand, quality or cost of the paint. I think there are as many "opinions" and "preferences" as there are painters so take what you hear verbally with that in mind, even from pros. The best source of information is the written technical data sheets from the manufacturer of each product. There is more information on mixing, compatibility and usage in those sheets than is usually indicated on the can labels. The larger automotive paint manufacturers have pretty good web sites where you can download such information.

If you decide to move up from the Rustoleum, I suggest you look at some of the automotive paints that are available. Each manufacturer usually has two or more product lines of quality/cost products. DuPont has their high end line(s) and their economy line known as NASON. PPG has their own high end and an economy line known as OMNI. Martin Senour (NAPA) also has different lines but I am not familiar with them. I recommend you try out an acrylic enamel in the economy line of either NASON or OMNI. In NASON, it's called "Fast Dry". In OMNI, it's called "MAE". Here's a data sheet for the Fast Dry and here's one for the MAE. If you want to spend more money, try out Centari in DuPont or Delstar in PPG (if it is available in your area). They are the better acrylic enamels but pricey for what they are nowadays.

The acrylic enamels are a little more resistant to premature fading than the alkyd (or synthetic) enamels common in hardware stores and "tractor paint" outlets. I could recommend higher performance products (urethane or hardened acrylic enamel) than the unhardened acrylic enamel but I suspect you do not have the proper breathing equipment ($400 minimum) to safely use them. The best primer is a two part automotive epoxy such as PPG's OMNI MP170. Here's a data sheet. It is a two part product but can safely be used with a simple cartridge mask. The appropriate thinner (called reducer in this case) and mix ratio will be spelled out on the can label or the data sheet. There are usually several different ones to use, depending on temperature at the time of spraying. Stick with the exact proprietary reducer that is specified by the manufacturer of the paint. Don't mix and match - that is a potential for unforseen problems. And don't try to paint below about 60 deg F. Wait until it gets warmer.

third party image Rod

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
[Options]  [Printer Friendly]  [Posting Help]  [Return to Forum]   [Log in to Reply]

Hop to:


TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). We have the parts you need to repair your tractor - the right parts. Our fast shipping, low prices and years of research make us your best choice when you need parts. Shop Online Today. [ About Us ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2019 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters

Website Accessibility Policy