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Antique Tractor Paint and Bodywork

buffing new and old paint

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Luke Rhonemus

02-14-2007 07:47:09




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I was wondering what the best procedure is to buffing old paint and new paint. I have a tractor with new paint that has some dust particles in it that someone told me could be buffed out. Is old paint buffed differently? How much buffing compound and what kind of pads or buffers work the best? Thanks!




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steven martin

02-20-2007 00:39:51




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to Luke Rhonemus, 02-14-2007 07:47:09  
Well I almost always stay out of matters like this but I can't. I think that the article that the gentleman wrote was very informative and correct. I have painted many automotive restorations in So. Cal. You can"t learn nothing without trying and many in my field stay tight lipped about tools and techs to satify their ego-need. Let him at it, you old _arts. Kolor -me- Kustom.



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glennster

02-15-2007 10:52:46




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to Luke Rhonemus, 02-14-2007 07:47:09  
third party image

luke, i guess i dint answer all your questions. as far as buffers are concerned, its a matter of choice and budget. here are some we use at our shop. snap on, mikwaukee, and makita
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the snap on is an 8 amp, the makita 10 amp, milwaukee is 11 amp.
max rpm is 1750. they will carry 7 to 9" pads.
these are big dollar high production units. for your purpose as an occasional use, you can get a more bargain oriented one that will do you just fine.
as far as pads, we use the presta and schlegel pads. they are 25-40.00 each. here is a photo of some of the pads we use here. they come in all different grades from heavy cut to polish. also in the top of the photo you can see a spur to keep the pads clean. for what you are doing, a heavy and a polish grade will work.
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next post i will show you some of the compounds

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glennster

02-15-2007 11:17:14




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to glennster, 02-15-2007 10:52:46  
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luke, here are some of the various compounds available for buffing. the 3m line has the perfect it 3000 series. very good, also the presta ultra cut creme, and the 3m finesse it along with the mequiars line are good too. for your purpose, you can get small cans of heavy compound and polish compound from say, napa. also pick up a bottle of the meguiars #5 new car glaze. between the pads and compounds, you'll have about $60.00 invested. a buffer from farm and fleet, maybe another 50-90 dollars. and 5or 6 sheets of 2000 grit wet sand paper. for a spur, you can use a large screwdriver to spur the pad. lay it on the pad, pull trigger, drag the screwdriver from the center out. next post i'll give you a quick lesson
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third party image

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glennster

02-15-2007 11:38:49




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to glennster, 02-15-2007 11:17:14  
ready to buff????
wash tractor with warm water with some car wash soap in it, get ALL the dirt and grit off. fill a 5 gal pail with warm water and car wash soap.
get a big sponge, fold the 2000 grit paper two folds so its about the size of a cigarette pack. dunk the sponge in the water, dunk the sandpaper too. using the palm of your hand sand in one direction, use plenty of soapy water, also use the hose to flood the panel to flush away any grit. you want the panel to have an even dull haze.
then wash and rinse the panel.
if there is any exposed rubber gaskets or weatherstrips, tape them off, the ammonia in the compounds will stain them white.
get buffer w coarse pad, put about a tablespoon of heavy compound on panel, fan buffer trigger, spread compound out about 16"square area, then buff, go up and down, move across the area, then go side to side, let the weight of the buffer do the work. buff up to and edges, not over them, the buffer can burn thru the paint. when done wash off compound, switch to polish pad, buff again. when done with that, clean the polish pad, switch to the #5 meguiars, buff for the last time. this will remove the swirl marks. of you have any questions, my email is always open.

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glennster

02-14-2007 10:55:15




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to Luke Rhonemus, 02-14-2007 07:47:09  
if your on a budget, stop out at your local napa, you will need a heavy buffing pad and a fine polishing pad, also heavy compound and polishing compound, and some 2000 grit wet sand paper. wet sand hood, use the palm of your hand not fingers, till the area is hazy, then use the heavy compound on heavy pad, after all that is done, go to the polishing pad and fine compound. pick up a spur also while at napa to keep the pads clean, it looks like a handle with little star wheels on it. spur the pad often to prevent buildup.

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B-maniac

02-14-2007 18:30:46




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to glennster, 02-14-2007 10:55:15  
Guess he forgot that you asked about a buffer also. Didn't see any mention of what to put the buffer pads on. Really , Luke , all you are gonna get on here in writing is enough info to really get you in trouble and screw up some paint. You really need to go and at least watch a pro do it and get your questions answered as he does it.That's the only way the answers are gonna make any sense to you. You can read all the books and watch all the videos you want. You can't ask them real time questions.A good place to learn might be if you had a few old weathered cars around that you couldn't hurt the paint on any worse than it already is. Probably not the case. I , for one , won't give those instructions on here because quite frankly , there isn't enough room and it would only spark another 100 questions in your mind that have to be shown and not told. Even if you are shown , I wouldn't start out practice on your project. Get an old fender or hood or something.As for what buffer to use , I won't even take a shot at that. I use a B/D 7.5 amp. 2800 rpm commercial buffer. I've had it since 1975 and never been rebuilt. Used darn near every day for 20 yrs. It's too fast for most but the speed and power will impart a shine like no other including the orbitals with sponges etc. Million ways to do it. Few that work good.Find a coach or do it the hard expensive way. Good Luck.

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B-maniac

02-15-2007 14:30:15




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to B-maniac, 02-14-2007 18:30:46  
Guess i misprinted...it's a 10 amp.



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Dandy Don

02-15-2007 10:18:58




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 Re: buffing new and old paint in reply to B-maniac, 02-14-2007 18:30:46  
B, That's very good advice. He needs to watch alot and ask alot of questions and then use an old fender or hood to practice on .Cheers. Don



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