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Discussion Forum

Fluid in tractor tires

Author 
Gordy J.

07-28-1998 08:20:50




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What is mixed with the water to prevent freezing in tractor tires? I've heard calcium cloride. Is this correct, and what concentration?




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Jason Breeding

07-29-1998 19:49:59




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 Re: Fluid in tractor tires in reply to Gordy J., 07-28-1998 08:20:50  
: What is mixed with the water to prevent freezing in tractor tires? I've heard calcium cloride. Is this correct, and what concentration?

I mix regular antifreeze with water in my tires. Here in Georgia, we don't have real cold temperatures, so I put in 1 or two gallons per tire depending upon size of the tire. The easiest way I know to get it in the tire is to use a portable 10 gallon air tank. Pour the antifreeze in the air tank, install the hose on the tank, and pressurize with your compressor. Then, turn the tire valve stem to the 12 o'clock position, hold the air tank upside down so the liquid is above the tank outlet, and shoot it in the tire. Next, hook up the garden hose to a valve stem adapter and fill to the top of the rim, not the tire. Then, air up the tire to the proper inflation.

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Steamer

07-29-1998 10:10:50




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 Re: Fluid in tractor tires in reply to Gordy J., 07-28-1998 08:20:50  
: What is mixed with the water to prevent freezing in tractor tires? I've heard calcium cloride. Is this correct, and what concentration?

A lot of people are mixing Ethylene Glycol (auto antifreeze) with the water these days. It costs a little more, but doesn't corrode things. To me, it would depend on the service I'm using the tractor for. I'd use calcium chloride in a field tractor, and ethylene glycol in a utility tractor.

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Paul Stanley

07-28-1998 11:38:58




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 Re: Fluid in tractor tires in reply to Gordy J., 07-28-1998 08:20:50  
Here is the receipe from my Oliver manual. If you live in a location where there is no freezing, just use water. Where freezing is a problem, use a mixture of calcium chloride and water. You need to determine how much solution first. I'll list some tire sizes and amounts. You judge from there
10-28 44 lbs of Calcium Chloride 22 gallons of water to minus 20 F. 228 lbs of total weight 72 lbs to 20.5 gallons of water to minus 40 F 244 lbs of total weight
11-28 62 lbs of Calcium Chloride 31 gallons of water to minus 20 F 322 lbs of total weight 102lbs to 29.25 gallons of water to minus 40 F 345 lbs of total weight
12-26 68 lbs of Calcium Chloride 34 gallons of water to minus 20 F 350 lbs of total weight 111lbs to 21.75 gallons of water to minus 40 F 376 lbs of total weight

Fill each tire about 75% full with air. Fill your container with the correct amount of water and add the required quantity of calcium chloride. WARNING When calcium chloride and water are mixed, a violent chemical reaction occurs which causes high temperatures. Add the calcium chloride to the water and stir-- DO NOT ADD THE WATER TO THE CALCIUM CHLORIDE. Be sure to let the liquid cool before attempting to fill the tires. After the calcium chloride and water solution has cooled, proceed to fill teh tires with the liquid. To do this, obtain an adapter and a length of ordinary garden hose. The adapter should have an air escape valve built into it to allow the air in the tire to escape as the liquid runs in. To install the calcium chloride and water solution. raise and block the tire off the ground, and rotate the wheel until the valve stem is in the uppermost position. Remove the valve core and connect the adapter. With the use of a tank above the level of the valve or a pump force the liquid into the tire until it begins to overflow through the relief valve of the adapter. At this point the tire is approximately 75 per cent full. Install the valve core and inlate the tire to the required air pressure.

Check the tires with a gauge designed to be used on tires containing an anti-freeze soluton. Wash the gauge throughly after the tires are checked to remove all traces of calcium chloride. A conventional tire pressure gauge will be severly damaged if it is allowed to come in contact with calcium chloride.

Having typed all that in. Wouldn't you really rather use wheel weights or have someone else do it for you? Hope this helps. Remember, I got this information from my manual. Others may have better advice for you. good luck and be careful, that stuff is corrosive. It will eat your rims like a teenager at a smorgasboard.

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Raymond Bagwell

08-03-1998 12:47:18




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 Re: Re: Fluid in tractor tires in reply to Paul Stanley, 07-28-1998 11:38:58  
some people use methanol mixed with water. I have done this myself. I have heard of others using windshield washer fluid. That is a cost of about 1 dollar per gallon. You can buy methanol for about 2 dollars per gallon. I bought a special filler valve at T S C to fill my tires. : Here is the receipe from my Oliver manual. If you live in a location where there is no freezing, just use water. Where freezing is a problem, use a mixture of calcium chloride and water. You need to determine how much solution first. I'll list some tire sizes and amounts. You judge from there
: 10-28 44 lbs of Calcium Chloride 22 gallons of water to minus 20 F. 228 lbs of total weight 72 lbs to 20.5 gallons of water to minus 40 F 244 lbs of total weight
: 11-28 62 lbs of Calcium Chloride 31 gallons of water to minus 20 F 322 lbs of total weight 102lbs to 29.25 gallons of water to minus 40 F 345 lbs of total weight
: 12-26 68 lbs of Calcium Chloride 34 gallons of water to minus 20 F 350 lbs of total weight 111lbs to 21.75 gallons of water to minus 40 F 376 lbs of total weight

: Fill each tire about 75% full with air. Fill your container with the correct amount of water and add the required quantity of calcium chloride. WARNING When calcium chloride and water are mixed, a violent chemical reaction occurs which causes high temperatures. Add the calcium chloride to the water and stir-- DO NOT ADD THE WATER TO THE CALCIUM CHLORIDE. Be sure to let the liquid cool before attempting to fill the tires. After the calcium chloride and water solution has cooled, proceed to fill teh tires with the liquid. To do this, obtain an adapter and a length of ordinary garden hose. The adapter should have an air escape valve built into it to allow the air in the tire to escape as the liquid runs in. To install the calcium chloride and water solution. raise and block the tire off the ground, and rotate the wheel until the valve stem is in the uppermost position. Remove the valve core and connect the adapter. With the use of a tank above the level of the valve or a pump force the liquid into the tire until it begins to overflow through the relief valve of the adapter. At this point the tire is approximately 75 per cent full. Install the valve core and inlate the tire to the required air pressure.

: Check the tires with a gauge designed to be used on tires containing an anti-freeze soluton. Wash the gauge throughly after the tires are checked to remove all traces of calcium chloride. A conventional tire pressure gauge will be severly damaged if it is allowed to come in contact with calcium chloride.

: Having typed all that in. Wouldn't you really rather use wheel weights or have someone else do it for you? Hope this helps. Remember, I got this information from my manual. Others may have better advice for you. good luck and be careful, that stuff is corrosive. It will eat your rims like a teenager at a smorgasboard.

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