Welcome! Please use the navigational links on your left to explore our website.

Company Logo Shop Now
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 
Marketplace
Classified Ads
Photo Ads
Tractor Parts

Community
Discussion Forums
Project Journals
Tractor Town
Your Stories
Show & Pull Guide
Events Calendar
Hauling Schedule

Galleries
Tractor Photos
Implement Photos
Vintage Photos
Help Identify
Parts & Pieces
Stuck & Troubled
Vintage Ads
Community Album
Photo Ad Archives

Research & Info
Articles
Tractor Registry
Tip of the Day
Safety Cartoons
Tractor Values
Serial Numbers
Tune-Up Guide
Paint Codes
List Prices
Production Nbrs
Tune-Up Specs
Torque Values
3-Point Specs
Glossary

Miscellaneous
Tractor Games
Just For Kids
Virtual Show
Museum Guide
Memorial Page
Feedback Form

Yesterday's Tractors Facebook Page

Related Sites
Tractor Shed
TractorLinks.com
Ford 8N/9N Club
Today's Tractors
Garden Tractors
Kountry Life
  
Tractor Talk Discussion Forum

Porting Cast Iron head

Welcome Guest, Log in or Register
Author  [Modern View]
Jwilhelm770

02-26-2020 10:17:00




Report to Moderator

Wondering if anyone knows of someone who could port a cast iron cylinder head for an Oliver. Thank you in advance!




[Log in to Reply]   [No Email]
dr sportster

02-28-2020 07:43:03




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Without use of a flow bench to measure actual progress it is recommended to only remove the casting flash from the ports. The most important part is the 1/2 inch before the valve seat. This can be worked with Cratex rubberized wheels [work to a nice radius enhancing the 3 angle valve job.] With the right abrasives you can do it yourself. There was saying about making ports to large " don't play Jerry Branch unless you are Jerry Branch" . Mindless porting will just make too large ports.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
ptfarmer

02-27-2020 22:05:04




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Air flow is one thing, but velocity is just as important. I have filled bottom of some ports up to 1/4" with no loss of flow, but the engine made more power because of the increase in port velocity. On the intake ports the increase of velocity helps keep the air/fuel mixed better thus you get better combustion. On an exhaust port the increase in velocity help draw out more spent exhaust gases out of the combustion chamber, and it also helps the intake draw in more air/fuel.
Another thing is how much valve lift you have, most also look at the airflow with the valve at it's maximum opening, and not at flow at half open (remember a valve reaches full open once, but it reaches half open twice).

I mentioned filling the bottom of ports can increase port velocity without reducing flow, but also if you can fill a port floor you are reducing the radius of the turn that air has to flow. The straighter you can make a port the better it works.

Before good aftermarket heads were available for the Ford 351 Cleveland the extreme bend in the exhaust port was a real power killer so what was done back in the day was modifying the exhaust ports with port plates. A section of the exhaust ports were milled away, and new exhaust port plates were put on to straighten out the ports, and it increased flow, and velocity dramatically.
Stock 351C 4V exhaust ports.


351 C 4V with port plates installed (note the ports are now smaller than the stock ports).



Hopefully this shows that it's just not about making ports bigger. A lot goes into cylinder head port work!

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
buickanddeere

02-27-2020 21:09:16




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see
It is usually safe on any cylinder head . To match the ports to the manifold . Grind port casting flashes off . Blend rough edges in the valve bowl . And the perform the classic valve and seat angle/width . Without a flow bench . Indeed it s not about removing any significant amount of metal, just work with what is there .



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
VicS

02-27-2020 15:01:38




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Where are you located? I go to Albion Il. Harrison Automotive. He has a flow bench. Also holds some NHRA records. Mine flows 40 % more. 618 445 2405.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
MikeJM

02-27-2020 04:54:41




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Without a flow bench, anyone would be shooting in the dark.

Generally on old tractor engines the port is already too big.
The biggest area to improve on is the valve seat area, seat angles and the area on either side of the valve.
The trouble with certain heads, especially gas engines with chambered heads is the chamber severely shrouds the valve, to the point a very large valve might flow worse.
What model Oliver? Waukesha installed larger valves and made the ports larger as hp increased through the years. It s not uncommon to install valves from a 880 into a 77 head.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
timcasbolt

02-27-2020 04:49:13




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

Exactly. That's why the work needs to be done by someone with a flow bench.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
buickanddeere

02-26-2020 19:46:22




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

Only if the valves are the restriction and not the port .

Valve and valve seat angles and widths are as important as valve diameter . In small bore, long stroke tractor engines. Large valves can hit the cylinder wall and flow is shrouded by the cylinder wall.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
jm.

02-26-2020 14:02:29




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Porting helps but going to larger valves really gives it a boost. don,t know what engine you are working on but larger valves will help.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
ss55

02-26-2020 12:18:24




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Racing engine shops: stock car, sprint car, drag, off-road, tractor pulling, etc.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
timcasbolt

02-26-2020 11:04:23




Report to Moderator
 Re: Porting Cast Iron head in reply to Jwilhelm770, 02-26-2020 10:17:00  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

You might check in with the younger guys at your local auto parts store. Find out if there's anyone in your area that builds drag racing engines. They would know where you can get a head done.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
[Options]  [Printer Friendly]  [Posting Help]  [Return to Forum]   [Log in to Reply]

Hop to:


TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). We have the parts you need to repair your tractor - the right parts. Our fast shipping, low prices and years of research make us your best choice when you need parts. Shop Online Today. [ About Us ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2019 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters

Website Accessibility Policy