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Tractor Talk Discussion Forum

Crop storage

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DeltaRed

10-11-2018 19:50:19




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Hemp is the hot 'new' crop here. Everybody got caught up with planting,growing and making 'truckloads of money.Seems they never considered storing the harvested crop. They cut the plant off at the ground and hang it up to dry,much like tobacco.It is all hand work.One outfit has 30 workers harvesting/hanging/transportingÖ. 16 acres-by hand.there are hundreds of acres being grown here this year.some people have 80-100 acres,or more. So shed space is in pretty short supply.What about the hanging wt? Are these sheds/barns going to stand,or collapse?They tell me that it needs to dry down to 8%.They tell me it should not freeze. It is supposed to freeze next week. they should have been harvesting a month ago. But they just let it grow to get "maximum yield".Looks to me that a lot of farmers/growers are going to be in trouble. Glad I'm not one of them.No hemp for me.

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Hay hay hay

10-13-2018 09:52:54




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
I keep hearing about all the uses for hemp, but since it has not been legal for a long time, it seems likely that it will take a period of time for the new processing plants to be built and then a while longer to develop customers, uses and end users. Further if it is going to require a significant amount of physical labor to cut and hang it (like tobacco did here) that may be a real challenge. Finding tobacco labor became a serious issue in the last decade when it was still big in Kentucky ( 2005-----2015).

My point is that hemp markets will probably take some time to develop.

Our recent state Ag commissioner talked like it was going to transform ag overnight...it hasn't so far.

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DeltaRed

10-12-2018 09:03:40




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Most of you seem to think I'm against hemp. I'm not.Not at all. I'm excited about a new cash crop.However I'm being cacious. I actually plowed,worked up a lot of ground for some hemp growers. they all gave me lots of information.I'm open to growing if the ducks get in their row.



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paul

10-12-2018 10:15:50




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-12-2018 09:03:40  
Same here. Iím all for new crops and new uses and more farming opportunities.

Just seen a lot of get rich quick ideas presented over the years, all end up a flash in the pan.

Soybeans are the last really big deal to hit, dad remembered when they were new and mostly a forage/ hay crop.

Emus, artichokes, ostrich, sunflowers(here, I understand they are important west of here), and other such ideas have a lot of hype, and then fizzle in about 3 years leaving the farmers holding the bills.

This hemp stuff keeps getting hyped by the wrong people.

Iíd be real scared investing in it.

Paul

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Case Nutty 1660

10-12-2018 08:38:36




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
I have been pushing Hard here in Wyoming to be able to grow it, but the dip sticks in charge think you can get high from it,, Brain Dead thinking,, I am hoping we can start voting out the brain washed idiots here and get with the program,, but right now its like talking to a post only the post listens better cnt



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IA Roy

10-12-2018 07:17:36




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Hemp was a new crop during WW2 in central Iowa. Probably more places.. There were 3 processing plants that I know of within 50 miles of me. Hemp rope was a substitute for rope traditionally procured from some Pacific countries that were either captured by the Japanese or in danger of capture. I guess it caused high demand for hand labor. I heard of turning windrows with a pitchfork to dry. Some Italian prisoners of war were used for labor. They fed and sheltered them and paid them a wage. It was not slave labor. Very low security risk, I was told. A number of them stayed after the war as they were treated well. A lot better than dodging bullets.

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Geo-TH,In

10-12-2018 14:20:07




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to IA Roy, 10-12-2018 07:17:36  
My dad said it was grown in Indiana as part of WW2 effort for rope.



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paul

10-12-2018 08:30:56




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to IA Roy, 10-12-2018 07:17:36  
Yup.

Mom talks about collecting milkweed seed pods too for the war, think they got used for life jackets, canít remeber now, but there were all sorts of things in big demand during WWII, and used unconventionally. Not many around any more to remember.

Paul



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glennster

10-12-2018 06:08:18




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
how about hemp concrete....hempcrete



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MJMJ

10-12-2018 06:04:31




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Why in the world would they be required to use a sickle mower? Or is it that they simply can't use a combine?



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Traditional Farmer

10-12-2018 06:50:21




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to MJMJ, 10-12-2018 06:04:31  
They use the whole stalk and don't want it torn up,can't see how running anything thru a combine would be the way to go to bale it up.Do you cut hay with a combine?



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connor9988

10-12-2018 07:29:28




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to Traditional Farmer, 10-12-2018 06:50:21  
I should have been more specific Traditional Farmer. I apologize. The videos I have seen of it they raised the cutter bar up to get as little plant material besides the seed and then came through later and cut/baled the rest. This is only what I have seen in videos and I am extrapolating some.



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Traditional Farmer

10-12-2018 08:26:36




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to connor9988, 10-12-2018 07:29:28  
Yea the buyer is going to use the whole plant.Now I'm getting this from a newspaper article but I do personally know a couple that have signed up to be growers so I'll be able to
see it first hand next year.



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BarnyardEngineering

10-12-2018 05:25:02




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Still amazes me how many people STILL have it in their heads that:

hemp = m a r i j u a n a

You can smoke a whole field of hemp and get nothing but lung cancer.

NY state is running a pilot program to study the viability of hemp. I looked into it but from what I can tell the only money in it is in the form of state grants. It's just another boondoggle. You have to be running some sort of "study" and there's no market for the crop. You destroy the crop at the end of the growing season.
Plus you need some ridiculous amount of "security" because the idiots in Albany still think hemp is pot! Fences, cameras, etc..

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NY 986

10-12-2018 09:51:48




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to BarnyardEngineering, 10-12-2018 05:25:02  
I don't think that is the point in most instances. The point is marijuana can be grown in a field of hemp and be difficult to trace. I had an extension guy out earlier in the year on another matter but he had just come from a grower interested in hemp. The extension guy's opinion was that there were a lot of obstacles to overcome to make hemp viable in the US not counting the marijuana association issue.

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paul

10-12-2018 08:37:34




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to BarnyardEngineering, 10-12-2018 05:25:02  
A problem is that the biggest proponents of hemp are also the biggest druggies that push for free weed on every corner. The Woody Heralsoms of the world.

Hemp would have come around a lot sooner if those groups had gone away, and real people with real ideas were in the forefront.

Itís fairly easy for the pot growers to hide their plants in a hemp field, and so there is that very natural attraction, and potential issue. That keeps all the security issues in the forefront.

Paul

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born2farm

10-12-2018 05:22:49




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Hemp was doing good as long as the ships had sails, when steam engine on ships started Hemp was not needed in great supply.Hemp was grown in the north more. In the south the warm climate the hemp had some poor thc, the slaves was getting high. So cotton was on top again and hemp was only grown in the north.



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sms

10-12-2018 04:48:41




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
My little old inventor friend(passed in 2000) proposed using hemp oil for biodiesel many years ago.



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Bruce from Can.

10-12-2018 03:28:56




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Both hemp and switch grass get talked about in the Ag press from time to time, and brought out as the crop that will save the farm. So far, mostly just talk. The idea is hemp and switch grass could be processed and pelleted for a use as fuel, for a variety of uses. Switch grass needs to only be planted once every 7 years, and grows well on poor soil, with minimum care, and is harvested each year. Like hemp, hasnít move corn or beans out of the way yet

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Traditional Farmer

10-12-2018 05:44:07




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to Bruce from Can., 10-12-2018 03:28:56  
Corn and Beans aren't illegal so that gives them the leg up for sure.There is a company in Rockingham County VA that has a contract with I think about 30 or 40 growers to supply Hemp for something they do.Many uses for Hemp the Gov't just needs to get out of the way.Growers are required to cut it with a sickle bar mower and bale it with a large round or square baler.There is a large group of farmers wanting to sign up to be growers so they must think it'll be profitable.Up side for me I have a pretty good inventory of sickle mowers I'll be advertising.(LOL)

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paul

10-12-2018 02:45:47




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Back in the 1940s a good tough fiber was something special, and hemp fibers were quite a deal to develop, it would have been big.

Today a whole lot of synthetic fibers can be blended into nearly and fiber one needs, stronger, rot proof, abrasion resistant, non absorbent, all types of properties. There is far less -need- for natural fibers on an industrial scale.

Lots of milenials have gotten on the Ďwe need hemp to save the family farmí bandwagon, without understanding the laws of supply and demand and how time and technology has moved on.

Ultimately, the demand for the fiber will never get very big, so it will be a small deal.

Itís fine, any few 100 or thousand acres of alternative crop is indeed an alternative.

The biggest market appears to be making tee shirts of the fibers (by beating the natural toughness out of them, ironically) with a pot leaf logo screened on it?

Really in the big picture, Iím not sure such Ďdemandí is going to turn agriculture around.

Jerusilum artichoke and emus might make a comeback sooner!

The window of opportunity for it to be a big deal came and went as the synthetic fibers have been developed.

It will be a nitche, but it wonít be the big deal you hear.

Paul

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Traditional Farmer

10-12-2018 05:35:06




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to paul, 10-12-2018 02:45:47  
Hundreds of things are being made out of Hemp all over the World right now,be a lot smarter to grow Hemp that is in demand than crops with low prices.The only thing that is holding Hemp back now is Gov't stupidity.



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John in La

10-12-2018 00:11:36




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
If a person said they were growing Jute; Flax; or Kenaf; no one would thing twice about it.
But tell someone you are growing Hemp; and everyone turns their head to listen.



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Traditional Farmer

10-11-2018 23:32:42




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Apparently a company is contracting for Hemp growers in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia I'm reading in the papers,they want it baled in either large square bales or large round bales.
As far as it being akin to Pot.So what? People have been making Moonshine out of corn around here for years no one has suggested to outlaw corn.



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greenenvy

10-11-2018 20:50:11




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
The one hemp field I know of in my neighborhood was cut and round baled and wrapped like a silage bale.



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connor9988

10-11-2018 20:47:33




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Delta Red I think industrial hemp would be a nice addition to the legal crops. I have heard that it is on the next farm bill. I dont see any harm in it since people cant smoke it to get high and it produces lots of good products from every part of the plant. It looks like you cut and thresh it with a combine to get the seed while windrowing it and baling it after to then use (sell) the stover.

Industrial hemp makes a stronger and softer fabric than cotton. It also makes good paper and oils that are used in plastics and all kinds of other uses. That is just the tip of the ice berg too.

There are some people who I have talked to about legalizing industrial hemp and they get a look of panic in their eyes when I tell them that it isn't a crop to get them high.

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ss55

10-11-2018 20:30:10




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
Makes one wonder how much of the crop is legal this year, and how much was already farmed on a large scale in past years.

As in any industry, if profits are there someone will find a way to mechanize and automate the process. Early adapters will sell at top prices and make a ton of profit. As the supply increases, prices will fall, and the high labor/high cost operations will fall away.



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Steve@Advance

10-11-2018 20:17:06




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 19:50:19  
I would think security would be the most important concern!

Many, many years ago I used to do some work on a mans cars, he was the older brother of a high school mate.

I knew all his occupations weren't exactly on the up and up. One day he came by the shop, needed me to ride home with him and bring his car back to the shop.

When we got there he opened the gate to the back yard and wanted to show me something...

He had probably 3 acres of head high pot plants! The most I had ever seen, a major operation, no telling what it was worth!

I congratulated him on his crop, got out of there!

It wasn't 2 days later, he was out of town, someone harvested it for him! Stole all of it from what I heard.

My first thought, and panic, he probably thinks I did it, or that I told someone about it!

He never said anything, I never brought it up, don't know if he ever found out who did it. I sure was wishing he had never shown it to me though!

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DeltaRed

10-11-2018 20:33:16




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to Steve@Advance, 10-11-2018 20:17:06  
Hemp is now legal in Colorado. It looks just like pot but has no 'recreational' propertys.Every Hemp 'farm' has warning/disclaimer signs posted all around them.



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Dr. Walt

10-12-2018 01:25:10




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to DeltaRed, 10-11-2018 20:33:16  
DeltaRed, I wonder if this will mean a come-back of the manufacture of Hemp Rope. After the advent of Nylon and all of the other synthetic ropes, I thought the use of hemp rope had all but completely died out. I still have a 200 foot coil of 1.5 inch diameter Manila Hemp Rope thats essentially like a "new" rope even though its over 50 years old, as it has had very little use. In my opinion, (speaking strictly of ropes) nothing feels as good in the hands as a good, soft Manila Hemp Rope.

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dr sportster

10-12-2018 10:07:31




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 Re: Crop storage in reply to Dr. Walt, 10-12-2018 01:25:10  
A synthetic fiber rope cannot be inspected . Fall man supporting rope they always use natural rope. A nylon rope exposed to chemicals will fail immediately.



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