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Tool Talk Discussion Forum

electrical question

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ldj

09-05-2019 15:58:01




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I have 220V going to plug for AC. The plug isn't in use any longer. Can the wires to that plug be used for 110V?




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Mule Meat

09-12-2019 13:14:02




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
Yes it can.

Black to 120 hot (120v breaker).

White to Netural.

Green to ground.

If 4 wire clip Red wire and cap with a wire nut on both ends.



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Dusty MI

09-07-2019 07:26:19




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
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He asked if the wire that was used for 220V be used for 110V.

Not how to do it.
Answer, yes, if the wire is romex, and done properly.
Dusty



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Stephen Newell

09-11-2019 18:48:26




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 Re: electrical question in reply to Dusty MI, 09-07-2019 07:26:19  
I think if someone has to ask something that basic they need all the help you can give them.



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dr sportster

09-06-2019 06:42:47




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
One leg of your wiring would be taken off the two pole breaker and placed on the neutral bar and the other wire would go to a single space breaker. 110 . God bless John T for his patient explanations !



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John T

09-06-2019 07:03:38




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 Re: electrical question in reply to dr sportster, 09-06-2019 06:42:47  
God bless John T for his patient explanations

Thanks but sometimes my patience runs short lol Maybe see you again in Florida

John T



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Billy Shafer

09-07-2019 07:12:54




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 Re: electrical question in reply to John T, 09-06-2019 07:03:38  
One of the questions that I have had. From a coustomer that made my patience run thin.

If the power goes out. Generator starts takes over the load.I turn the generator off. What will happen.

My answer. It is going to get dark.



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4wdtom

09-06-2019 06:06:54




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
Stephen Newell has it explained well for you.



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John T

09-06-2019 06:04:44




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
WOW as always, ask an electrical question and there will be several answers, many accurate some maybe confusing. Here's the deal in my professional opinion albeit rusty as I'm long retired:

QUESTION: "I have 220V going to plug for AC. The plug isn't in use any longer. Can the wires to that plug be used for 110V?"

1) Not being there I would say there's a good chance the 240 receptacle has two hots, L1 & L2 plus a typical bare/green EQUIPMENT GROUNDING CONDUCTOR (That's NOT the same as a Neutral). The two hots L1 & L2 would be 240 Volts line to line or 120 either Line to a Neutral.

2) Ifffffffffff ?? that's indeed the case, you should NOT (if safety and the NEC matters) use one hot 120 volt leg and substitute an actual EQUIPMENT GROUNDING CONDUCTOR for the Neutral (NEUTRAL IS NOTTTTTT THE SAME AS THE EQUIPMENT GROUNDING CONDUCTOR) that's a safety and National Electrical Code (NEC) violation. YES Billy Bob and Bubba it will "work" using one hot leg and the equipment grounding conductor substituted for the Neutral. If there are three wires from panel to the receptacle they can, however, be re wired and re configured as described below correctly using a Hot, a Neutral, and a third safety wire equipment grounding conductor.

3) If its a 240 circuit it will be connected to a 240 volt two pole circuit breaker, but for 120 a single pole 120 volt breaker should be used.

4) In the event you want to install a 120 volt 15 amp NEMA 5-15R 2 pole 3 wire grounding receptacle there and want to re wire and reconfigure it can indeed be done as follows using three wires: A 120 Volt two pole two wire receptacle that has no equipment ground requires only two wires.

Use ONE of the two Hots, L1 OR L2, it will be wired to a 120 volt 15 amp single pole circuit breaker in the panel NOT one leg of the 240 volt two pole breaker is my suggestion even if that still works,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Use/run a wire for the Neutral which connects to the Neutral Buss in your panel,,,,,,,,,,,,,Use/run a wire (often insulated sometimes bare, typically Green if insulated) from the grounding terminal on the receptacle to the GROUND BUSS in the panel.

NOTE on some 120/240 Volt main distribution (NOT a sub panel) panels there are separate Neutral and Ground busses bonded together while on some panels there is only one common Neutral and Ground buss where all the white Neutrals and bare/green grounding conductors attach.

NOTE if its really old two wire system there are Hots and Neutrals ran to 120 volt 2 pole receptacles that don't have any third safety wire grounding terminal.

NOTE if its a more modern 120/240 Volt Single Phase Three Wire distribution panel there are three wires ran to NEMA 5 -15R 120 Volt 2 Pole 3 wire grounding receptacles, being a Hot, a Neutral and an equipment grounding conductor.

NOTE if its a metal junction/receptacle box, it also needs bonded to the equipment grounding conductor.

SOOOOOOOOOOOOO yes it can be done and it requires three proper wires (Hot, Neutral, Ground) for a 120 Volt 15 Amp 2 pole 3 wire NEMA 5-15R grounding receptacle

If in doubt where life and fire safety is concerned consult trained professional electricians and engineers, the NEC and local authority NOT an internet forum and not what I say, I'm long retired n rusty as a power distribution design engineer.

John T

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Billy Shafer

09-06-2019 06:28:00




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 Re: electrical question in reply to John T, 09-06-2019 06:04:44  
This is why you get to answer all the good questions. I have learned to stay away from them.



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John T

09-06-2019 07:01:34




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 Re: electrical question in reply to Billy Shafer, 09-06-2019 06:28:00  
Hey Billy, hope all is well down your way. I broke down and trashed my Genajunk and installed that new Onan and boy am I glad I did. yayyyyyyyyyyyyyyy

John T



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Billy Shafer

09-06-2019 13:42:42




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 Re: electrical question in reply to John T, 09-06-2019 07:01:34  
John T glad it is working out for you. They still have not fixed the one in town. So much for warranty.

Everything is fine down here. Could do with some cool air. It was 85 when I went to bed at 11 last night. Maybe Santa will bring some cool air.Enjoy your new unit.



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buickanddeere

09-06-2019 05:41:56




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
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This running neutral current on ground is pure stupidity and is dangerous . Don t do it . Ground and neutral are not "the same thing". Why is one bare and the other insulated ?



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showcrop

09-06-2019 03:51:18




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
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2X what jake said. Even though some of the replies here are perfectly correct and make perfect sense, if one doesn't have basic knowledge of electricity, or doesn't take the time to read replies carefully, this would all be beyond understanding so it would be best to hire an electrician.



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jake2

09-06-2019 02:53:51




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
Given all the replies, and the apprent confusion.....BEFORE you burn the house down or electrocute yourself, I'd seek a professional. Little cost may save you a lot of grief.


My opinion, your mileage may vary.



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john in la

09-05-2019 23:47:37




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
I beg to differ with some of the replies.

Right now you have 2 hot wires. May or may not have a bare ground wire.

It is most likely a dedicated wire from the electric box to the a/c plug. If that is true ..,....

In the electric box remove both wires from the 220 breaker. Remove the breaker from the box and install a 110 breaker. Now hook the black wire to that breaker. Hook the white wire that use to be hot to the neutral bar in the box.

You can now hook the 110 plug as you normally would to that wire.

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old

09-05-2019 19:23:39




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
Is it the old 3 wire or 4 wire or maybe even 2 wire. 2 wire would be both hot leads no ground or neutral. 3 wire would be 2 hot and a ground. 4 wire would be 2 hot leads a ground and a neutral



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showcrop

09-05-2019 17:51:54




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
TX what S. Newell said. In order to connect dryer wire to the pigtail to the outlet you can use a split nut.



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M-MAN

09-05-2019 17:18:58




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
See how many wires you have. I ran 12/3 with ground to mine. Neutral is capped but can be converted in minutes.



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Tony in SD

09-05-2019 17:17:24




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
Maybe. If it is on a circuit by it self, It sould be easy to do. You need to get a single breaker of appropriate size to replace the double pole breaker. Then you need to replace the 220 v outlet with a wire 110 v outlet, wire the new breaker in the panel to match. I would also re-color/tape the wires black and white at each end if not already those colors. If you are not sure of what you are doing, It would be best to hire a licensed electrician.

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Tony in SD

09-05-2019 17:20:30




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 Re: electrical question in reply to Tony in SD, 09-05-2019 17:17:24  
I forgot to mention that it would only meet code if there are 3 wires (Hot, Neutral, Ground)



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Stephen Newell

09-05-2019 16:37:43




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
You can't use the doubled breaker it has now. You can disconnect the wires at the electrical panel and install a single breaker and repurpose one of the hot wires for a neutral. As long as there is three wires there you can convert it to 110V. You need one hot wire, one neutral wire and one ground wire. Now if it's 10 gauge wire you will have a devil of a time attaching it to the outlet unless you use a pigtail with a smaller wire. You could use a 20 amp breaker with 10 gauge wire and use a 12 gauge wire for the pigtail. You may need to re-code the wires if the colors of the insulation is different than black and white. You wrap the wire with different color electrical tape to identify the wire as being used for a different purpose so if for example you are using a red wire for a neutral someone doesn't think it's a hot wire in the future. A piece of white tape wrapped around the end of the wire would serve that purpose.

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kcm.MN

09-05-2019 16:32:11




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
Guess I should elaborate a bit. I've seen before where someone removed the 2nd hot of a 220V outlet (keeping the black/gold terminal hot) and just wired everything else to ground. There was no Neutral.
Black/gold = black wire/gold screw. I've always remembered which side was which by remembering Black Gold (oil). Must be the Texan in me. *lol*



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kcm.MN

09-05-2019 16:28:20




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
"Can" it? Yes.
"Should" it? No.



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David G

09-05-2019 16:10:02




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 Re: electrical question in reply to ldj, 09-05-2019 15:58:01  
Most likely no, unless the wiring is changed and you make one of the hots to a neutral.



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