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Tool Talk Discussion Forum

Hammer I.D.

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Butch(oh)

08-13-2019 17:21:35




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What was this hammer used for?




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Cliff(VA)

08-15-2019 09:28:00




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
That is NOT a hammer. Whoever called it a cold cut is correct. It is a handled cold chisel. It is a very common blacksmith tool.

Cliff(VA) now (NC)



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PJH

08-14-2019 15:35:27




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
My friend, a railroad section hand, has a tool very similar to that. He calls it a "cold cut". He said it was used to "mark" the sharp corners all around a railroad rail, then the rail was put in side tension and snapped to length. One man held the cold cut, while another man struck it with a heavy sledge. I can't imagine that working, but I never knew him to tell phony stories. I have one around here somewhere that I used to try to use as a firewood maul. It did not work well for splitting wood - just a little too light weight for my liking.

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Butch(oh)

08-14-2019 03:16:25




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
I inherited it from my step father. I don't know if it helps or is even related to it but he was a pipeline welder for the gas company. I'm just going to clean it up a bit and let it occupy a spot on the hearth with my other old axes and hammers.



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Russ from MN

08-13-2019 20:38:43




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
This is a Rail spike hammer, I even drove a spike with one once!



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tony in sd

08-14-2019 04:08:14




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Russ from MN, 08-13-2019 20:38:43  
Itís not a spike maul. I drove 1000ís of spikes with a spoke maul (above) when I worked for the railroad one summer in my college years. We shortened the handle so we could swing it faster. 3 hits was all we needed to set the spike firmly.



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Butch(oh)

08-14-2019 03:07:16




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Russ from MN, 08-13-2019 20:38:43  
Around the steel mill they called that type of spike sledge a "B&O"



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NC wayne

08-13-2019 20:34:20




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
I've got hammers designed to drive spikes that I use to drive pins, or as a handled punch when I need a heavier sledge to do the driving. This definitely isn't one

I'd also say this one was used as a chisel. I say this because if you look closely at the head, it appears the edges are slightly mushroomed. Mushrooming tends to happen far more from being struck with another hammer, rather than being used to strike something.

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Absent Minded Farmer

08-13-2019 19:00:03




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
I had also thought it was a spiking maul until I seen the flat wedge on the right. Handle's also too short for that & the hammer end is too fat. x3 on the hot chisel.

Mike



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unc

08-13-2019 18:28:11




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
X2 hot chisel. unc



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Jeffcat

08-13-2019 18:01:59




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
The axe used for splitting rails looks something like that but with a nice sharp end. Lots of tools are just different versions of a more basic tool and then modified to do specific jobs. Really neat to see how tools of long ago have changed.



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John Garner

08-13-2019 17:52:32




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
Looks like a blacksmith's "hot chisel", used to cut red hot metal. A blacksmith's chisel has a handle -- used to hold the chisel edge against the piece to be cut -- and then struck with a hand sledge. The blade of a hot chisel is substantially thinner than the blade of a cold chisel, and the hot metal is much easier to cut than cold metal . . . those two factors together make a hot-chisel cut very much easier than a cold chisel cut of the same material.

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Steve Neul

08-13-2019 17:29:10




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 Re: Hammer I.D. in reply to Butch(oh), 08-13-2019 17:21:35  
I would call that a rail splitter for driving railroad spikes.



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