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Update to NAA overheating/John Walker

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John Walker

06-09-1999 18:29:41




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OK .... I've gotten the gasket for the sediment bulb. It is back on without any problems. I reconnected the fuel line to the carb. I then removed the drain plug at the bottom of the carb.

A supply of gas poured out and then a constant trickle. The trickle was about equal to the trickle I had coming out of the disconnected fuel line at the carb yesterday.

I put the plug back in and tapped on the carb with screw driver as you suggested. I started the engine and it ran for a bit and died again. I still noticed the surging in the idle speed.

Eventually after enough sessions of running and dying the temp went to the green/red mark. It then seemed to drop and not go as high but I can't say for sure. Without the engine running for any substantial length of time it is hard to say if it is cooling or not.

I am not sure how quickly fuel should drip into the sediment bowl but it just doesn't seem all that fast to me. It is a drip not a steady line of fuel. Maybe it is suppose to drip, I don't know.

I'm frustrated. Frustrated with my tractor and myself.

I certainly can replace the coil and I can replace the carb or even rebuild it if necessary. However, I'm beginning to envision some horrible problem that may mean paying someone to do some drastic repairs.

Thanks Randy for your suggestions. I wonder if I should try these things before proceeding back to the coil/points side of things?

Maybe after a nights rest I will be a bit more optimistic about things.

Thanks everyone for your input. I'm amazed at people's efforts to help.

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cHRIS

06-10-1999 20:31:49




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 Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to John Walker, 06-09-1999 18:29:41  
John,you should have a steady stream of fuel running not dripping out of the sediment bowl. Could you have rust in your gas tank?
try blowing out your fuel line back into the tank to clear it.



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John Walker

06-14-1999 06:46:40




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 Re: Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to cHRIS, 06-10-1999 20:31:49  
OK folks... prior to seeing the great responses, here is what I did this weekend. Of course you must recall that prior to this I had taken the sediment bulb off and cleaned it (but there wasn't much to clean). I then disconnected the fuel line at the carb. and the line between bulb and carb was clear. I then hooked the sediment bulb and the line at the sediment bulb back up and turned on the fuel. I did get fuel at the carb but it didn't seem to be a strong flow. I wasn't sure what it should look like. I had also noticed that the flow into the sediment bulb was a drip of varying intensity.

I hooked everything back up and still had the same problem. This weekend I decided to take the carb. off. I did that as well as take the chance to do an oil change, top of the air filter cup and other maintenance tasks.

I took the carb off and cleaned it and took it apart to see if anything was amiss. I couldn't see anything obviously wrong (but then I'm not an expert) and put it all back on. We were getting ready to make a run to get some gas and I thought, with all the playing around with the fuel system, I would add some more gasoline while I was topping everything else off. I had about 2 1/2 gallons in the tank and added about 3 more.

I started the tractor and it never died and the thermostat seemed to be working properly (as initially the NAA was overheating).

Now with some of my observations when RKS was walking me through troubleshooting, (e.g. slow flow into the bulb and slow flow out the fuel line) and in conjunction with the input here on the board I wonder if the additional fuel in the tank was providing more pressure on the inlet tubes from the gas tank to the sediment bulb thus giving me adequate fuel supply to keep running.

This seems to fit with some of the latest experiences shared here on the board. If so it indicates that I need to focus on the shut off valve. Can you get replacement valves? How does it attach to the fuel tank? Does it just screw on? What do you all think?

Thanks so much for all of your help.

John

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RKS

06-16-1999 15:13:21




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 Re: Re: Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to John Walker, 06-14-1999 06:46:40  
I think you've found the problem. Would have been good to see if it would crank and run normally before adding the fuel, but "max nix." As far as the fuel running out of the fuel line - that is subjective, but with a full tank and the valve open completely, it ought to stand out in a stream 3 inches or more horizontally. I wouldn't classify it as a "trickle" in any sense. Also, even a low fuel level in the tank would always normally feed the carb enough. You can drain the fuel back to the level it was and see if the problem continues, and if so you'll have to organize some method to clean out the tank and the line - probably remove the tank and remove the valve from the tank, clean and reseal everything with a gas resistant sealant. If with low fuel the stream improves then you may have removed blockage without knowing exactly what. But, now after the general crisis is over, you need to find someone who will show you how to do a tune-up at least once before you dig in yourself. I'm afraid from this point, I prefer to bow out since even a very simple tune-up could put you out of running. Sounds to me like you aren't afraid, so go for it - just slowly so you don't get lost. RKS

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JW

06-21-1999 11:16:44




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 Re: Re: Re: Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to RKS, 06-16-1999 15:13:21  
RKS - I do want to thank you in particular for all of your efforts. You walked me through with great patience. For all the others I thank you too.

Regarding the tune up, do you think it would be worth buying one of the video tapes that walks you through doing a tune up on an NAA?

I wanted to replace the plugs and so I bought the whole tune up kit (it wasn't much more) so I have the parts ready to go.

Just a side note. I now have a hydraulics problem that I may be posting questions about later. The tractor won't lift the mowing deck. That is for another thread.

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RKS

06-22-1999 04:02:48




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 Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to JW, 06-21-1999 11:16:44  
I think the video would probably be great, although I haven't seen it myself. You need something or someone to help get past that first awkward time when things can really go wrong and leave you stranded. I don't know anything about hydraulics. Good luck, RKS



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RKS

06-22-1999 04:01:55




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 Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to JW, 06-21-1999 11:16:44  
I think the video would probably be great, although I haven't seen it myself. You need something or someone to help get past that first awkward time when things can really go wrong and leave you stranded. I don't know anything about hydraulics. Good luck, RKs



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Tad

06-11-1999 13:52:24




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 Re: Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to cHRIS, 06-10-1999 20:31:49  
John, you might check to see if your fuel shut off has inadvertantly closed. The stream of gas should be about the inside diameter of your gas line. Good luck



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Tom Majeski

06-13-1999 20:46:17




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 Re: Re: Re: Update to NAA overheating/John Walker in reply to Tad, 06-11-1999 13:52:24  
John,
I had a similar problem with my newly purchased Jubilee. I removed the sediment bowl, took the entire assembly apart and cleaned it up. During the cleanup, I discovered that there a two outlets. One is an inch-long copper tube that protrudes from the fitting that screws into the bottom of the gas tanks and the other is hidden inside the fitting, alongside the copper tube. The copper unit is the normal gas outlet and the other is for the reserve. (Check the fuel shutoff knob and you will find two settings.) I used a piece of nylon cutting string from my gas-powered weed whip to clean out both ports. They were jammed with crud. Before reinstalling the sediment bowl, I flushed out the gas tank several times. Since then, I've put about 8 hours on the tach and the engine hasn't missed a beat.

Give it a try. It worked for me.

Tom

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