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Ford Tractors Discussion Forum
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Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires

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radara4077

12-15-2014 10:20:22




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Thanks to this site and the great advice I've gotten on this forum, the 841S I "inherited" from my late Papaw in the spring is up and running. There are still a few kinks (an impending clutch replacement is most likely in my future), but for the most part she runs great. I couldn't be happier. In the rush to get the tractor ready for hay season (and due in part to a lack of funds), I didn't put any rear ballast in the new-to-me tires I bought in late May. For the light tedding and raking I'd be doing, I knew I wouldn't need it.

Since then, I've come to realize how much I miss having that extra weight. I was backing a loaded wagon into an old barn last week, and very quickly began to dislike the slight incline up to the floor level of the barn combined with the light rear-end of my tractor. With funds now available, and with winter setting in, it's time to tackle these tires. In addition, Dad lost all the fluid in one of the rear tires on his IH 140, so now we have 3 tires to fill.

That being said, what is the best method you all have discovered (short of buying our own pump) for filling these tires? I've asked around, and I think the best option is a mixture of water and anti-freeze. But the problem is going to be getting it in the tire. We have a loader, so we can use gravity as an aid. But how do you get past the problem of the existing air being in the tire?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

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Royse

12-17-2014 14:53:20




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
That is a picture of a drill pump that I posted.
Runs with your drill, connects with two garden hose fittings.



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radara4077

12-16-2014 11:11:43




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
Cast iron is more reliable, I'd imagine (as you don't potentially lose all your ballast every time you have a flat tire). But from what I understand, liquid ballast in your tire is more effective, as it puts the weight closer to the ground.



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Ultradog MN

12-16-2014 09:59:43




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
A couple of times I have used the water pump from my tile saw. Hook it up and go do something else for an hour. Come back and burp it a couple of times.
I have decided to go with used antifreeze.
I'd rather have cast iron weights but can't seem to find any.
I just asked about it on Tractor Talk

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Jimmyjack

12-17-2014 14:05:19




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to Ultradog MN, 12-16-2014 09:59:43  
Ive got a set of sandblasted and painted Roloff three piece weights Id part with in central Wis. and if I sell my 860 Ill have a complete set of blasted and painted pie weights.



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Ultradog MN

12-17-2014 15:28:29




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to Jimmyjack, 12-17-2014 14:05:19  
Thanks JJ.
I need them for my 4400. Rims are 24" and lug pattern is 8 on 8" so neither set would fit.
The ones I need are the stackable ones that bolt on to the center. You can see the 3 holes where they bolt on in the photo.

third party image



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radara4077

12-16-2014 09:12:53




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
Thank you all for the replies.

I'm leaning very heavily against using calcium, because of its corrosive nature.

sounNDguy, this "drill pump" of which you speak, is it called that because it attaches to an electric or cordless drill?



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old

12-17-2014 14:41:10




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-16-2014 09:12:53  
Yes a drill pump is just that and sold by many farm and home stores as well as hardware stores



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NNP

12-16-2014 08:39:57




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
I do quite a few (windshield washer fluid)

so I put one of those plastic water tanks up in my shop rafter storage area.(35 gallon I think it was)

faucet and a garden hose on it.

garden hose adapter fill valve on the tire.

floorjack under the rear.

easy



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Dave Sherburne NY

12-15-2014 18:35:05




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
This is the best/easiest way I have found



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hurleyjd

12-15-2014 16:43:54




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
Let the air out of the tire. lower the jack so the tire goes flat. Get a hose that will fit on the valve stem with the core removed. Place the gallon of anti freeze at a point that is higher than the tire. clamp the hose to the valve stem, Jack the tire up and the tire will suck the anti freeze into the tire. Repeat jack and lower as many times as possible to get the anti freeze into the tire. Then use the valve that fits the garden hose to finish filling the tire. To do this have the valve stem at 12 o' clock.

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Royse

12-15-2014 14:36:00




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
I use a drill pump similar to this one and the burp valve that

has already been mentioned. The threads are cheap plastic,

so try to keep tension off of them or they'll strip.

third party image



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sunbeam

12-15-2014 11:35:47




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
Calcium will be much cheaper



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sunbeam

12-15-2014 21:17:30




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to sunbeam, 12-15-2014 11:35:47  
calcium is usually added 3.5 to 5 lbs and 20% to 28% more weight than water check with your local ready mix



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old

12-15-2014 12:42:37




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to sunbeam, 12-15-2014 11:35:47  
Last tire I filled with wiper fluid cost e around $36 for the wiper fluid so it does not cost all that much more



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soundguy

12-15-2014 12:34:35




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to sunbeam, 12-15-2014 11:35:47  
a lean mix of water and antifreeze is the cheapest!



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old

12-15-2014 11:22:44




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
Send me an e-mail and I will then send you a page out of a owners manual that shows 3 or 4 ways of putting fluid in tires. I have filled many tires with fluid and I tend to use wiper fluid because it does not cause rusted rims like the Calcium does



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soundguy

12-15-2014 11:07:25




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
2 part question.

1, you get fluid in and air out with a burp valve. places like napa and tractor supply sell a little valve you screw on, then screw a garden hose on it. you use your city water or well pump to to the work of putting fluid in, then every now and then hit a button to burp air out.

2, to add ballast, get some eco safe antifreeze, ww fluid etc.. whatever liquid you are using, and add it first. can add it with a funnel and a piece of rubber line and a lil patience, or use something like a 4$ drill pump to pump in the ballast, then finish the fill with water.

I dodn't do a 50/50 fill myself, i just put in enough ballast to prevent the water from freezing solid.. slushy is ok.

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714_run

12-15-2014 11:07:01




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 Re: Best Way to Put Fluid into Rear Tires in reply to radara4077, 12-15-2014 10:20:22  
They make a special fitting to go on the valve stem and connect to a garden hose, and it has a push button to vent [sold at Tractor Supply], or just use vice grips and pinch the hose and pull it off to vent the air. Loader bucket and gravity will work just fine.



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