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Farmall & IHC Tractors Discussion Forum
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Rebuild break in

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bennettre

06-30-2020 02:57:07




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What procedure do you use for engine rebuild break in? I have instructions for the first 30 minutes broken out in increments but what is 50% load? It sounds like it ties to more than rpms. How do I get it there? 75-100%?




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brownie450

06-30-2020 11:19:34




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
One of the older guys in the neighborhood always
said that hauling manure was the best break-in
a new/ rebuild engine could get.
Some load---some idle, & not too much of either.
Jim



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D Slater

06-30-2020 10:24:50




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
Bring engine up to operating temp and run it in one gear lower than the top one on level ground for 15 minutes at 3/4 throttle. Use radiator cover if needed to raise engine temp. Operate at 3/4 throttle for 45 minutes on light work. Run 2 hours on medium Heavy work at full throttle. Check head nuts after shut down and adjust the valves.



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bennettre

06-30-2020 08:00:42




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
Thank you



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bennettre

06-30-2020 07:59:21




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
Thank you



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bennettre

06-30-2020 07:58:36




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
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Thank you



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John M

06-30-2020 05:56:12




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
Once we had them running right, we just putzed around on them for a few days, retorque the head, set the valves and went to the fields.



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Ken Hansen

06-30-2020 05:30:49




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
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All good ideas, but I believe the two main things are to not just start and let it sit with no load on it for long periods of time and don't beat the crap out of it before it's up to temperature.

Keep an eye on fluid levels and temperatures and an oil change after a few hours to get out the initial wear material and the stuff you missed while cleaning parts, you know you missed some, then work it like it was made to work!

This is basically what I did when I rebuilt my BN something like 35 years ago and it's running good today and very seldom needs oil added between changes once a year. Oil pressure does get near the red mark on gauge after mowing five acres with the L306, but then I never changed to another gauge to see if the original one was accurate.

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Janicholson

06-30-2020 04:37:14




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
Good question. Load is the amount of work being applied to the tractor's engine as a % of its rated Horse power. In a dealership, the load can be applied by a dynamometer. (a device used on the PTO to measure horsepower, torque, and RPM. It is adjustable so that loads from no load, to actually bringing the engine to maximum torque can be applied rather scientifically.
In practice at the farm, the idea is modified for a common sense approach. Newly rebuilt engines are operated carefully so that internal parts can get used to each other. Like a honeymoon for heavy metal. Components get meshed and polished by contact and become operational with less friction. Especially rings and cylinder walls, and engine bearings and their journals. The process, when done well, leads to a long service life, and good economy of operation.
Parts of the process as I have been taught and practiced:
Pre-lubricate the entire engine with assembly lube on journals, cam lobes, and gears/chains, as it is being put together. Applying engine oil to the pistons/rings/cylinders, and doing a prestart oil gallery fill with a pressurized method of filling the galleries with oil so it has pressure within seconds of startup.
Initial start and warm up, then resetting valve clearances, adjustments to carb mixture and timing to specification. Then head retorque (if called for by the gasket maker, or service manual).
On restart, running at various speeds from idle to medium high speeds for 30 minutes without loading the engine (not driving or using the PTO).
Cool down and check oil level, and for leaks.
Next is to restart, and drive it around for an hour or so at all speeds from idle to wide open, with the driving being a light load.
Recheck fluids and temperatures.
Using an implement like a disk harrow, or bush hog cutter, apply a variety of loads by depth of cut, or width of cut to apply variable loads and speeds from mid rpm to wide open. This should be done over two days or more for about 10 to 15 hours of operation.
At least 3 to4 hours of this should be using loads and gearing to bring the engine to its maximum power at its rated PTO rpm.
Then change the oil and filter, and check for leaks and general cleanup of sheet metal and tidiness.
From that point on, it is ready for use as a fresh engine. Regular maintenance is performed as by the book. I would only use 15-40 diesel grade oil in it no matter what the original manual indicates because oil companies have made far more progress in the last 20 yars than in all prior production. I hope this helps. Jim

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DR. EVIL

06-30-2020 04:01:44




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 Re: Rebuild break in in reply to bennettre, 06-30-2020 02:57:07  
A dyno, or other substantial constant load like feed grinder, works to break-in. Tillage work, plowing risking is how most tractors were broke in. Still works.



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