Welcome! Please use the navigational links to explore our website.
PartsASAP LogoCompany Logo Auction Link (800) 853-2651

Shop Now

   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver

Case Tractors Discussion Forum
:

frosty carb

Welcome Guest, Log in or Register
Author  [Modern View]
andydap

10-21-2019 17:05:04




Report to Moderator

hi,
what cause the carb to frost up on a VAC and eventually quit?
andy




[Log in to Reply]   [No Email]
kevinthefixer

10-26-2019 16:56:24




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
As the others said, it's normal, happens to almost anything with a carb. This is why the exhaust manifold is connected to the intake manifold, so the exhaust heat can warm the intake. This process can be sped up by shutting off the engine for a few minutes after the exhaust has heated up. Warming the intake air helps, too.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Bill(Wis)

10-26-2019 09:59:36




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
Air flowing through the carburetor venturi speeds up and then rapidly expands. "Expansion of a gas (air) is a cooling process". Something that used to be taught in school. It has been shown, in some carburetors, to cause as much as a 60 degree F drop in temp. That's why carburetor equipped aircraft engines incorporate some form of carburetor heat mechanism to prevent carburetor icing. The ice you observed on the outside of the carb will just as well form on the inside and can eventually choke off all of the fuel/air flow. Not good. We had a big Ford cabover truck that was famous for carb icing. Usually happened on 40 degree days with a good bit of moisture in the air. The way we kept it from happening was to use Mobil Super+ gasoline in it. It had sufficient anti-icing ingredients in it to keep ice from forming. (They call Mobil high octane gas "Super+" here in Wisconsin)

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
L.Fure

10-22-2019 08:13:03




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

That's the way I do it too. Cold damp days will cause this to happen. Another way is to warm up the engine as described in the operators manual. After starting the engine, and making sure the oil pressure is up, run the engine full throttle until the engine reaches operating temperature. Then put it to work.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
R.w.b.

10-22-2019 02:42:03




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
I start my long throat manifold tractors,let them run no load quarter throttle couple minutes,shut em off for 4 or 5 minutes,restart and most every time they run ok not frosted up.lets heat come down that long throat



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
tomturkey

10-21-2019 20:56:35




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
My VAC, SC, DC and 400 all frost up on occasion. It has never made them not run, and seems to melt off after a bit. Just the workings of an updraft carburetor. I always have believed the outside relative humidity levels played a role in this also. gobble



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
old

10-21-2019 19:45:12




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
That is the nature of how a carb works and is part of life and it they did not do that they would not work. Atomizing of the fuel causes the carb to get cold and that in turn can cause carbs to ice up. That is why older cars and truck had a hot air intake tube off the exhaust manifold to pull warm air into the intake. One can help that problem by making a side cover or some such thing to help keep the carb warmer. Or let ti run a bit longer so the manifolds heat up more before you work it

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
flatpkr

10-21-2019 18:07:42




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
Itís a normal thing, the Case SC does the same thing and probably many other makes and modelís. Possibly the fuel/air mixture being much colder than the outside air temp. Once engine heats up to operating temp. It goes away. About all I know about it.
Jim



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
kenbob

10-21-2019 18:04:50




Report to Moderator
 Re: frosty carb in reply to andydap, 10-21-2019 17:05:04  
Do you use gasohol? Not sure what the underlying cause is, but it certainly makes it worse.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
[Options]  [Printer Friendly]  [Posting Help]  [Return to Forum]   [Log in to Reply]

Hop to:


TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
We sell tractor parts!  We have the parts you need to repair your tractor - the right parts. Our low prices and years of research make us your best choice when you need parts. Shop Online Today. [ About Us ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2023 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters

Website Accessibility Policy