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Case Tractors Discussion Forum
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Case CC oil pan

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Basil Greenleaf

09-06-2010 10:14:38




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Will the oil pan drop straight down on my 1931 Case CC or does the front casting with radiator have to be moved forward? I am trying to remove the engine oil pump. My oil pressure is in the 100 PSI + range. I think it should be around 40. Thanks, Basil




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mshultz

09-07-2010 18:34:58




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 Re: Case CC oil pan in reply to Basil Greenleaf, 09-06-2010 10:14:38  
Hi Basil.

I think you'll need to loosen things up at the bellhousing to get the pan to drop. As Mel said - the front timing cover comes down across the front of the pan, but there are no bolts into the oil pan. Sorry I haven't been more help - my oil system is a hybrid of C parts and DC parts so I'm not sure which parts came from where anymore.

Below is the info I found in my service manual (I cut out the stuff for L series):

The adjustable ball type reilef valve is used on series C engines prior to 4209666 and is located in the pump body. Relief valve adjustment for a pressure of 30-35psi can be made by working through the oil pan inspection hand hole plates.

Series C engines after 4209665 and all other series have a non-adjustable plunger type relief valve that is located in the pump body. Normal oil pressure on C and D series is 30-35psi.

From the diagram in the service manual, it looks like a hex head threaded plug that screws into the pump body near the upper gear (if it's like mine I think this is brass?? - it's fairly large in the diagram so I'd think it would be obvious if you saw it - only other thing at that level on the pump is the outlet elbow) It has a picture of a relieve spring behind that cap with a piston like valve at the end of it. I'm guessing this is the fixed style. I would think if that relieve valve would be hung up in the hole or the spring is gunked up, it wouldn't allow for the pressure to release. I don't know from the picture which direction this would be heading - so I have no idea if it is something you can access from the hand holes or if you'd be better off dropping the pan. You'll need a helper (or a floor jack) to drop the pan.. or at least to put it back up!

Hopefully this helps. If needed, I can try to take a picture of the manual and e-mail you, or if you're not in a hurry I could photo copy what I have on the oil pump and send it in the mail. Let me know if you need anything else.

Good luck,

Mike

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Basil Greenleaf

09-08-2010 03:48:02




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 Re: Case CC oil pan in reply to mshultz, 09-07-2010 18:34:58  
Thanks Mike for al the information. I realy appreciate all the information from you and others that have replyed. Looking through the inspection holes in the pan I cannot see anything that looks like what you described. I must have one of a kind. My plans are to drop the pan today. Will let you know how things go. I"m not sure what problems can result from 110 PSI oil pressure. Thanks, Basil



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wilson

09-06-2010 13:30:32




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 Re: Case CC oil pan in reply to Basil Greenleaf, 09-06-2010 10:14:38  
I feel sure you will have to loosen the front. However I really think the pump is not the problem. Carefully check guages and if possible make sure something is not blocked. I realize this has the plunger guage. The cc's have delivery pipes to the mains possibly through the hand holes oil flow could be checked. I rebuilt my cc (engine on workbench) years ago but cannot rember it all. Isn't there an outside oil plug somewhere to check oil flow??

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mEl

09-06-2010 13:22:31




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 Re: Case CC oil pan in reply to Basil Greenleaf, 09-06-2010 10:14:38  
Basil, You should not have to drop the pan to access the relief valve, I believe that I read a post that the relief valve was in the piping which you should be able to get through the small side pans. Mike Shultz may have put that post up. According to the early DC operators manual, the pan may be dropped by loosening the bell housing split and allowing the engine/ transmission housing to sag which will allow the pan to drop down, on a D series there are two special dowel bolts in one side of the pan, the two with nuts on them, they position the pan in the proper position in relation to the timing cover, - the timing gear cover gasket just loops down around the front of the oil pan but has no bolts that screw into the pan. I suspect the C is the same. The D series has the relief valve in the pump but that is still accessable without dropping the pan through the LH side rear side cover. It is a 7/8" long nut that sticks out of the pump body toward the left side of the tractor. I got the impression that the C series used an external relief from previous posts and there are guys on this forum who can for sure tell us. Just sit back a bit and I'm sure it will be cleared up. mEl
This post was edited by mEl at 13:30:44 09/06/10.

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