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Case Tractors Discussion Forum
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attention mEl

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johndeereman

08-24-2010 14:42:09




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tore my dc apart found that some of the rings lined themselves up for whatever reason. hopefully this was all my problem however on reassembling my torque wrench decided not to click anymore and i broke a head stud off in the block anybody have a trick to getting the remainder of it out? got a hole drilled in it but an easy out wont take it out open for suggestions thanks




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johndeereman

08-25-2010 09:01:53




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to johndeereman, 08-24-2010 14:42:09  
got the bolt out finally .ended up drilling everything else i tried failed that little bugger was stuck good. im sure the cylinders are wore pretty good just trying to get by with it for another year or so till i get the cash to do it right



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wilson

08-25-2010 14:17:05




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to johndeereman, 08-25-2010 09:01:53  
I fully understand having to just get by for a year or so. Actually I respect it as What one buys provided the cash is there is NOT what gets one in finicnal trouble, It's the interest on borrowed money that takes one down.How ever be glad this is the CASE forum as a fellow named buick and deere on other sites would always say do it perfect. I recall starting out with a $5.00 farmall F12 and a DC case for $125.00 which didnot run.Paid $60.00 for parts DC to keep it going. Those worked for a time till I could pay for a new tractor.

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johndeereman

08-25-2010 14:58:56




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to wilson, 08-25-2010 14:17:05  
i refuse to go into debt to do a tractor the right way and if its worn out your not hurting anything needs new sleeves and pistons anyway just might use a little more oil than it should now just doing it half right i will not do i rebuilt an ollie 88 for a guy i worked for he got rings and such forgot main bearings well the old ones were wore to the copper i refused to reassemble it the way it was with new parts so he fired me i said my name goes on this tractor till it gets redone again it was only i think $50 for the bearings no wear on the crank yet now to do this dc right your talking $1000 easy big difference

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4435

08-25-2010 05:06:49




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 Done this a couple tmes in reply to johndeereman, 08-24-2010 14:42:09  
Since you already have a hole in it blow it out with a torch and clean the threads up with a tap. There may some drawbacks to this on a block, however I don't know what it would be. Tom



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Camboted

08-25-2010 02:46:56




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to johndeereman, 08-24-2010 14:42:09  
This may be a recommendation for suicide and I've never had the guts to try it, but it was used on C-130's during the VN War (Not by ME!!) They heated the bolt up with a torch (red hot) then sprayed it with a can of ether until it was ice cold and screwed them out with their fingers. Believe it or not. Maybe there is a non explosive refrigerant you could use?



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JGarner

08-26-2010 08:21:41




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to Camboted, 08-25-2010 02:46:56  
Ted, Nitrogen would do the same thing. It is non explosive and non poluting, aafe on all counts. Nitrogen is readily available at welding supply stores. Argon, like for the MIG sheilding gas, may also work but I need to look up the boiling point on it.

Jim



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JGarner

08-24-2010 16:52:11




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to johndeereman, 08-24-2010 14:42:09  
JDman, don't know how big the hole is you drilled, but if you have a little room to play with get a lefthand twist drill from McMaster Carr about 1/64 to 1/32" bigger than the hole you have drilled. Using a reversible drill motor enlarge the hole while drilling in the counterclock wise direction. The stud will probably twist out when you start to break through the bottom of the stud into the hole and the flutes grab the bottom of the stud. If this doesn't work see mEl's method.

Jim

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mEl

08-24-2010 16:07:34




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to johndeereman, 08-24-2010 14:42:09  
JDMan, We have taken quite a few out as you can imagine. We have had good luck covering the engine except where you are working and welding a flat washer to the stud and a nut to the washer, letting it cool, shocking it and adding pb blaster and gently working it loose, it will help that you have a hole through it as that will allow it to shrink a bit as it cools. Use a small enough washer to stay away from the threads in the block and weld a larger washer to the first one to get a decent size area to weld a nut to. I don't know if welding is your cup of tea but if not I'm sure you have some good ones up there close. I have heard of people grinding the studs out with a die grinder and carbide bits but the that would put metal fragments everywhere!! On your rings, if the rings are the three piece type make sure that the oil rings are expanded good and that the expander has not lapped over at the joint not putting pressure out on the scraper rails. That can very easily happen with the 3 piece ring setup and if it has the oil ring will be back flush with the piston, not sticking out so it can be compressed. Keep me posted. mEl

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johndeereman

08-24-2010 19:03:32




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to mEl, 08-24-2010 16:07:34  
i usually weld a small bolt inside the hole i drill but wasnt sure if i wanted to get the welder out on this application guess i will in the morning thanks all and yes mel they are the 3 piece oil ring all looked good except all rings on #2 piston were alligned and 3 out of 4 on #1



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mEl

08-25-2010 04:00:17




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to johndeereman, 08-24-2010 19:03:32  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see JD while I do not advocate gaps lined up I do not see that as a cause of that much oil burning. I'd be making measurement for wear and taper to see if all is in tolerance or near at least as these are not a fussy engine, I have seen many that had the scraper edges clear worn off the old cast rings with spring expanders and still not burn oil excessively. Since you were putting the head back on I guess its to late for a thorough investigation and measuring with a bore gage full length on the sleeve and at 90 deg. to pick up the out of round. Something severe is allowing as much oil as you describe to get into the cylinders, Don't overlook loose valve guides, they should have just running clearance and no more. Call if you want to discuss anything. mEl

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wilson

08-24-2010 14:57:13




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 Re: attention mEl in reply to johndeereman, 08-24-2010 14:42:09  
as SARAH P would say DRILL BABY DRILL Sorry I'm in one of those moods.



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