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Discussion Forum

Pole barn floor

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mikejc in WI

08-16-2010 06:29:26
98.144.110.4



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I have a pole barn that was used for sheep in the past but now I am using it as a machinery shed. I estimate it is 40 x 60. Our place is in sand country so the floor is very dusty and seems to get deeper and deeper as the sand dries out. Does any one have an idea what I can do with the floor to keep the dust down?
I thought about putting in a layer of crushed rock or stone but I am open to any suggestions.

If crushed rock or stone is an answer what do I ask for? Is it sold by size? type?

Thanks,

Mike

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dbernie

08-18-2010 11:47:00
4.252.134.63



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
I got lucky and got a deal on some old used heavy duty, 1" thick, tough, interlocking rubber matts. Almost covers the whole floor.

Stuff was heavy, but sure easier to crawl around on than rock.

Have no idea where to find the stuff, so this ain't much help.

Just thought I'd mention it.



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mikejc in WI

08-18-2010 09:01:41
98.144.110.4



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
Thanks every one for your help, I have some good ideas and a place to start. One more question, If I use runner crush or fly ash as suggested, how thick should my layer be?

Mike



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Larry in IA

08-16-2010 20:43:00
97.64.163.217



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
If you have a coal burning power plant nearby I have a suggestion. A by-product leftover from burning coal is fly-ash. Our local power plant puts their extra ash in a huge pile, waters it down then compacts the ash with a roller. This produces what is called c-stone. This c-stone then is sold to contractors. When put in a barn, leveled off, wetted down and compacted, it gets very hard with no dust. Relatively inexpensive in our area. You might ask around about it.

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Traditional Farmer

08-16-2010 18:10:52
184.0.125.218



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
Its called Crusher Run at the quarry gravel with some of the fines still in it.It will pack pretty good should solve your problem



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Shovelman

08-16-2010 17:35:37
99.175.157.14



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
We've used asphalt millings in our pole barns with good results.

A few years ago, the DOT was milling the main road through our town in preparation for paving. I cut a deal with the contractor for the millings for $100/tri-axle load delivered to our farm. It was the best $3500 I ever spent. We used it to "pave" our driveway, all around the barns and inside as well. We still have a good sized pile left over.

As time went on, it knitted back together and looks and acts like pavement, especially in the high traffic areas.

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Mike M

08-16-2010 16:58:12
72.251.100.120



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
Lightly sprinkle used motor oil ( park your leaking cars around ) on it then pack it down.



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JDknut

08-16-2010 08:49:23
152.119.255.251



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
3/4 inch minus runnercrush.



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Loren MN

08-16-2010 08:35:50
64.65.174.118



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
Crushed granite works good. It packs down pretty well, and doesn't have much dust, especially if you water it down for a while after it's spread out. I poured concrete for 2/3 of my pole barn floor, and used crushed granite for the rest of it by the door, for the area where I park steel wheel tractors or crawlers. I used crushed granite on part of my driveway too, and it packed down over time similar to class 5, but a lot cleaner on tires, etc. I think it was around $12/yard last time I bought it.

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Loren MN

08-16-2010 08:42:57
64.65.174.118



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to Loren MN, 08-16-2010 08:35:50  

Here's what the crushed granite looks like on the driveway.



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agpilot

08-16-2010 19:43:52
173.84.16.52



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to Loren MN, 08-16-2010 08:42:57  
Hello Loren: NICE.. I saw that '58 and completely forgot what the topic was.. I had a '58 Bonneville with factory tri-power plus most all of the extras.. But it was all white with light Blue interior.. I really liked those 3 duce carbs. Good gas milage and good power when needed. Gave it to my brother when he got back in the states after his Vietnam tour. I got to drive a '58 Impala which also had tri-power but can't remember size of engine. 348cube? Testing my memory. THANKs for posting that chevy. oh ya, driveway looks nice too. ag

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Loren MN

08-17-2010 09:14:35
64.65.174.118



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to agpilot, 08-16-2010 19:43:52  
Thanks for the complements on the Impala. We just finished restoring it last year. 348 with 3x2 carbs, column shift 3 speed. Was about a 20 year project, built one car out of two. Did the body work in the early 1990's, and it sat for a long time before we got serious about spending the $$$ to finish it a few years ago.



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Dean

08-16-2010 12:52:37
68.46.208.21



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to Loren MN, 08-16-2010 08:42:57  
That is one nice 58!

Many 58 models were unappreciated in the day but have earned a belated following partially due to fewer existing numbers than the classic 57s.

My father had a 1958 Oldsmobile 98 Starfire when I first had a drivers license. With a 371 J2 tri-power engine, four speed hydramatic, AC and just and all of the available bells and whistles of the day, it was quite a ride.

Dean

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Dave 2N

08-16-2010 11:39:28
74.32.117.45



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to Loren MN, 08-16-2010 08:42:57  
Sorry-I can"t see crushed granite. All I can see is a beautiful "58 Impala. Nice!!!



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dave2

08-16-2010 08:49:31
139.139.35.70



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to Loren MN, 08-16-2010 08:42:57  
did the 12 bucks include the whitewalls or was they extra?? :roll:
Very nice and the driveway ain'ttoo bad either.

Dave



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dave2

08-16-2010 08:29:05
139.139.35.70



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
We can get a stuff here that's called (translated) mineral concrete. Sounds like what Russ is describing. Crushed up to about 1" limestone with the dirt and added sand. Sand has something in it that helps it stick (clay or a little cement?). Works very good if you pack it. Can always repack and/or add to it and it drains a little also. Flexes with winter also.

Dave



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Russ from MN

08-16-2010 08:22:25
68.235.68.3



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
In our sheds at the farm we used class 5 gravel, (3/4 crushed rock with the fines and some clay added to make it pack) then covered it with poly to reduce moisture and then used paper mill dryer felt, one of the fringe benefits of working in a paper mill! stays dry and you can sweep it out, just can't weld inside as the felt is a plastic material.



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ChrisLSD

08-16-2010 07:50:30
97.114.232.16



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
here is an alternative not many people have heard of......
I am not a seles person or even seen one of these jobs (pretty big in Calif and nature type places)... but the idea is good

If it were mine I am thinking about using pea rock size material - but if your sand is free.....



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jahaze

08-16-2010 09:45:06
173.13.25.165



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to ChrisLSD, 08-16-2010 07:50:30  
That polypavement looks cool. It"s likely a polyacrylimide compound that binds soil particles together, often used in soil-erosion control materials (and useful things like diapers, for holding in moisture). I wonder if it would hold up for a freeze-thaw cycle.



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jahaze

08-16-2010 07:16:54
173.13.25.165



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
How deep did you put the crushed concrete? I have a gravel floor now and would like to do something different.



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M Nut

08-16-2010 06:40:29
74.33.104.144



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 Re: Pole barn floor in reply to mikejc in WI, 08-16-2010 06:29:26  
Do you have access to recycled concrete? I like to use that, then wet it down after it has been leveled inside. Sets up good. Or, better yet, rent a vibrating packer machine, then dampen it, then let it set up. Almost as solid as concrete then.



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