Yesterday's Tractor Co.
Shop Now View Cart
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 
Marketplace
Classified Ads
Photo Ads
Tractor Parts

Community
Discussion Forums
Project Journals
Tractor Town
Your Stories
Show & Pull Guide
Events Calendar
Hauling Schedule

Galleries
Tractor Photos
Implement Photos
Vintage Photos
Help Identify
Parts & Pieces
Stuck & Troubled
Vintage Ads
Community Album
Photo Ad Archives

Research & Info
Articles
Tractor Registry
Tip of the Day
Safety Cartoons
Tractor Values
Serial Numbers
Tune-Up Guide
Paint Codes
List Prices
Production Nbrs
Tune-Up Specs
Torque Values
3-Point Specs
Glossary

Miscellaneous
Tractor Games
Just For Kids
Virtual Show
Museum Guide
Memorial Page
Feedback Form

Yesterday's Tractors Facebook Page

Related Sites
Tractor Shed
TractorLinks.com
Ford 8N/9N Club
Today's Tractors
Garden Tractors
Classic Trucks
Kountry Life
  
Tractor Talk Discussion Forum

Keeping him down on the farm

Welcome Guest, Log in or Register
Author  [Modern View]
showcrop

02-09-2018 05:28:00




Report to Moderator

What are you doing to try to keep your son (or maybe daughter,) on the farm so that you can transition to him? It goes without saying that the farm life is not for everyone, and the chances that your son will be one who will ultimately take the farm over are most likely under 50%, but it sure is good for everyone when the transition happens and it goes smoothly. I had hoped that my son would step into my business, but it was not to be, so at age 55 I sold out. I have seen others whose son wanted no part of it, yet when the father suddenly died or became incapacitated, he came back and seemed to do well. I have also seen where the father gives the son no say, or responsibility, or input into decision making, so the son seems to slowly drift away. On the other hand if you were to give the son responsibility for the decisions on a major part of the operation, and then he makes a major mistake the consequences can be grave. What is your plan and how are you implementing it and how does it seem to be working?

[Log in to Reply]   [No Email]
hrross

02-09-2018 22:31:29




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
we raised 3 kids on our dairy, 2 boys, one in the navy 17yrs other works in town as welder, lives across the street, never offers to help on the farm, we fianaced there house, he worked for me 4 years after high school(home school), liked driving tractor, not milking. payed a decent wage to all the kids according to the work they did, all left home with money in there pocket. I feel that since I paid them wages while working, I don't owe them part of the farm as inheartace, but were still trying to figer that all out. my daughter probably liked the farm the most, but has moved and married out on east coast, still thinking maybe moving back at some point to help and take care of us as we get older. if someone would show some interest in the farm, would maybe get some of it in future. we had our farm bought and paid for along with additional lands and farms and rental houses. I'm not interested in being fair, only in someone to take over the farm and keep it in the family, since we worked so hard for it in the first place

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
olgentdc

02-09-2018 16:52:48




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
We Tried to expose the Kids to Rural lifestyle , I Think Anyone That Doesnot try To lead Their Children into a Farm Life Style might as well just quit Right now ,. my children liked it and enjoyed it . but the World got them All .. key factor today is their Cost Benifit analysis of the simple things that are required ,. For instance 4 hours Baling Hay puts 500 square bales in the barn at 5 bux a bale =2500. not bad for a couple hours work ,,. but forget about changing a wagon tire , putting teeth in the rake and welding up on the haybine, tightening the chain and Belts , and changing fuel filters and oil fluids thruout the tractor , Not to Mention Greasing And preventative Maintenance . The World Has taught Them That Every Effort Must get a dollar bill back as a reward ,,.. That kind of thinking will starve the world

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
coshoo

02-09-2018 11:40:41




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
Dad bought the place in 1948 (140 acres for $4,500- those were the days!), and by 1951 he was milking "Grade A". We struggled along milking 35-40 cows until '61, when he sold the cows (but kept the farm). I got into FFA in high school ('62), and was really into farming. When I was a senior ('66), dad and I were discussing what we'd need to do to put in an elevated milking parlor and get back into the business. Mom overheard us, and said "We tried milking before, and it didn't work out. You might as well forget it, not going to do it again, son is going to college, and that's that". Dad didn't protest much, I think he was getting used to having some money to play with for a change. Wasn't much I could do without him backing me.

It was probably the best thing that ever happened to me- I got into part-time farming (beef) after I got married, and about 10 years of that was enough- to be honest, I really didn't take to physical labor all that much. If I had gone into diary, it would have been a disaster. Fast forward, had a good career and am now happily retired, and don't regret never farming full time.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Keith Molden

02-09-2018 16:16:41




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to coshoo, 02-09-2018 11:40:41  
Gee Cosho, you must be 69 or 70 now. I too graduated in 66 and was in FFA. My Grand daughter was president last year and my Grand son is a sophomore and he says they do nothing in his vo ag class. He says the one he has is just starting out, pretty on the eyes but doesn't want anyone to get dirty so they stay in the class room, no judging or shop work at all. Sure has changed since we were in. Keith

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
2002sliverado

02-09-2018 10:32:15




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
I have probably shared more in my posts on this topic than I should have, but I guess that is necessary in making my points understood. I didn't get the "start" to farming like so many others did, where their fathers went out of their way to bring a son/daughter into the existing operations by either having enough their to share in it, or investing in some sort of expansion or diversification of the operation to provide that opportunity to their heir apparent. My father lacked the financial resources to lend this assistance to me. My grandfather "ruled his empire" with an iron fist, and seemed to not have a clue as to how to "build up" his own sons to have the drive and the stamina to expand and succeed. My grandfather was the third generation on the land, and had some luck and success in his outside endeavors with non-farm business ventures. My father was the oldest of five kids. He has always been rather bright, and learned a lot about farming by working for others part time while in his teens, and just doing things. He moved away for period of time, married my mother, and came back to the farm in a position NOT of financial strength. He worked for my grandfather as his hired hand for 14 years. My dad's youngest brother came back, in the mid-1970's, after he couldn't hack it in the real world, another son in a position NOT of financial strength, but having bachelor's degree in economics and finance. My grandfather became less involved in the day to day operations, while working in his off-farm employment and business ventures, but kept his two sons under pretty tight reins. The youngest son, as I noted, came back with his "tail between his legs" and my grandfather told his oldest son (my father) and his youngest son (12 years younger) "they were equal partners." That set the tone for a troubled partnership, with the youngest one lacking quite a bit in "sweat equity," but my father didn't openly talk about this "sore spot" with anyone. My mother went to work for one of those "off farm business ventures" my grandfather was involved in as Chairman of the Board and CEO. Next comes the second eldest son to come and work in that business as Vice-Chairman. My mother indicated she had a very good working relationship with my grandfather in that setting, however the relationship with my uncle, her brother in law began to get strained, especially when my grandfather phased into semi-retirement, giving up his position as CEO, but retaining the role as Chairman of the Board until his death. That uncle has since retired, and got his money from the business when he sold it. As I look at how he managed it though, he managed it poorly from an HR standpoint, because he was rather open about how he viewed himself in that role as "GOD." The business existed, but it never grew under his "watch." My dad and the rest of his siblings were paid out of their shares of this business when it was sold. There is no further legacy of my family in that institution, as it operates under a totally different name today. The readers of this may wonder what about the other two siblings. Well, another uncle, after graduating college, went to work in a nearby town for a financial institution. From there, after about 6 years, he moved to a large metro area within that same company, working his way up the corporate ladder and did quite well in life, but I cannot help but wonder what sort of a physical toll it may have taken on him, as he died from a terminal illness. My dad's other sibling lived mostly in large, metropolitan areas and worked for a number of years in wholesale for various department stores, and several years later decided to go back to teaching. The uncle that came back to the farm, along with his wife, employed some pretty calculated and devious tactics to push me away from the farm for the better part of 25 years, as well as attempts to push my father out of the operation as well. The farm was split up in the 1990's. Both times I moved back, in the hope of working my way into the farm, the assaults upon my being there were ramped up, and after I left both times, they "played nice" once again with me, while the deliberate attempts to "weasel" their way into those tracts of my father's and under his control would start again. Sometimes these were rather subtle, in loaning a piece of equipment to my father, or doing favors, and it never failed, at some time, the uncle would hit him up to rent my dad's farm from him, or "help him" always with an ulterior motive. When I made my last career move, it involved a physical move from my hometown, to another community a half an hour away. Within a few days of the word getting out about that, my farming uncle approached my dad about "taking over a piece of real estate" I had been in control of and tending to for the prior 7 years. I can only imagine what would have happened if I had moved "hours away," or died! My father had a difficult partnership with this brother while they were working together for about 20 years. Both my grandparents had to die before my father started talking about all the frustrations he had in his relationship with my grandfather, and ultimately the difficulties he had working with his brother. I had been pushed away from the farm by my parents for so many years because: 1) they didn't want me to have any involvement or be subjected to the turmoil in that "strained partnership" he with my farming uncle; 2) they didn't want me to come back to the farm in a position of financial weakness; 3) my father and I already had a strained relationship, and he didn't want to see it strained to the degree his relationship had been strained with his own father; and 4) my father felt more like a failure than a success in his farming endeavors. It took some growing up and some healing on my part, as well as some healing on my father's part, to start mending things between us. I grew up in a hardnosed disciplinarian family with two working parents. My sibling and I had daily and weekly chores and tasks to complete, and I pitched in to the farming efforts as best I could, while also holding down a part time job, in order to put myself through college. I resented for some time being pushed away. My parents knew of my resentment, but didn't want me to come into a "minefield" either. Additionally, with the fallout of the farm crisis in the 1980's, rural areas experienced an exodus of their youth out and away from these smaller communities. I didn't like the various work places I went to, but at least with every place along the way, I had made new friends, many whom I still have close knit relationships with to this day. I cannot stress how hard those first 13 years were for me. My heart was always on the farm, thus I would try a couple different jobs in very close proximity to that farm, so I could spend my spare time working there, especially in the spring and fall, which I did each and every year I was in high school, college, and every job I had, regardless if I was living and working just a few minutes away from the family farm, or several hours away. I didn't ask for or expect a dime for my work! In 2004 or 2005, I took some time off from work leading up to the weekend. My parents had to be away for my sister's college graduation, several states away. I asked for a bit of help from a family friend, and he worked the soil ahead of my planting the last few hundred acres of crop that spring. Those were some very long days for me, since I was going from 6 am until 9 pm, but we got the job done. I don't know for sure, but that determination of mine, along with that effort, seemed to be a turning point for my father in seeing my level of commitment and interest in the family farm. That also seemed to be a key point in healing the difficult relationship we had between us. It was 2 years later, my dad semi-retired and decided to rent the farm to me. I maintain my job because it is a good paying job, and I can do most of what I need to do on weekends and my days off from work, along with help from my father. He hasn't always agreed with what I have done, but he has seen many of the results have been positive and productive. He and my mother both regret pushing me away like they had done. They also admit to living on the farm and raising us there, was the best place to be. I seem to suspect my father regrets not doing more to bring me into the operation several years earlier, as he sees the merits of what I have been able to bring to the operation. He has found joy in farming and working with me, something he didn't have in the strained partnership with his brother, or the difficult relationship with his own father. I also think he feels now, had I been actively and financially involved 10 or 15 years earlier, he would have found greater success. My father, as well as my mom, regret a lot of mistakes they made. Don't we all! They grasp hold of and have realized the interest and the passion I have always had about farming, and regret minimizing or dismissing it for so many years. In my own growth, both personally and professionally, I harbor no resentment or ill feelings about what happened in the past. As I have shared elsewhere, the struggles, the pain, the doors slammed shut, those outside uncontrollable forces working against me and my interests...................all those negatives, have made me who I am today. I would like to think I am a better person as a result, where I am a much better manager, having more confidence in what I am doing. I think I am more appreciative of the good things that happen, but also a lot stronger and more resilient when bad things happen. By and large, I think I am a more humble and charitable person, realizing there is much more to this world than just me. I see to many others who are so "self absorbed." I think I am more conscientious of my actions, and the after effects of those actions towards others, in wanting to be more considerate of others. I have also eluded to the "chip on my shoulder." I don't very often go there, but I have and will, when someone tries to compare himself to me and suggests "I have had it made," or "I know exactly what you are going through or been through." That confidence and strength I have gained, has also ingrained a willingness and ability to stand up to others and fight for what I truly believe, or feel threatened over. I noted some of those outside forces working against me. Twenty years ago, I would have avoided certain conflict or confrontation. That is no longer the case. I do exercise tact and diplomacy, but am able to speak with courage, resiliency, and I can and will push back when required.

When I look at some of my long time acquaintances and peers, who got the start, support, and backing from their father I had wanted so bad, well, I find it rather interesting and enlightening in how I see them handle downturns, failures, and other adversities. There were times, when those closest to me, thought I was close to "breaking" or "going over the edge." I will admit there were times I did crawl into a bottle and didn't want to come out. I had many mornings, when it was physically and mentally painful to put my pants on and go to work on Monday mornings. I lost my faith for a time. I was angry and bitter, and I felt this way for a long time. I hated the life I was living, particularly my work life. I hated where I was living at the time. I was angry in how I felt it was one bad thing followed by another. Part of that anger stemmed from feeling like "I was a good son. I did all that everyone had asked of me and then some. I didn't get into trouble. I tried to do good things. Good things are supposed to happen to good people. I had openly asked God what I had done to deserve this perceived hell I felt I was living in. I felt just about everything I had my fingers in turned to "horse manure." My breakthrough started when I made the decision to make my last career move. Interviewing and accepting that job was exactly what I needed to do. I had my eyes so focused on "the farm," that I lacked the peripheral vision to see or look for anything else, and begin to realize it was not meant to be for me to be that full time farmer as I had wanted to much. I was blind to the signs God was sending me for so long, or as my father always said, "I couldn't see the forest through the trees." I had been fighting for, and beating my head against the wall for something that was not intended or planned for me, and I truly believe all that was conditioning and resiliency training I had to go through to make me who and what I am today.

So back to the question at hand, and why did I go into the depth and detail I did? There are a lot of experiences I shared in HOW NOT to bring in the next generation to not only a family farming operation, but a family business. Failures are not all bad. I failed in my first job out of college, but I learned a lot from that failure. Albert Einstein once said, "Insanity is going the same thing over and over and expecting a different outcome." Failing once is a lesson. Failing again for the same reason probably approaches the point of insanity. Especially today, I see too many young men coming back to their father's farms, in similar conditions and situations as I tried on two separate occasions, before I started renting my family's farm. Too little experience and short on financial resources. I feel it is imperative for those coming back to the farm to have experience and success off and away from the family farm, before coming back. Working for somebody other than dad (or family) instills a lot of experiences and traits which cannot be obtained by never working for someone not related. I also think it strengthens the work ethic and adds some depth to how to conduct business with others, along with dealing with potential employees. I also believe that outside work experience adds a "removed dimension" to making business decisions. Combine this, with professional success outside the farm, I feel promotes a desire to "grow one's business" rather than "wring whatever one can out of the farm" and merely exist.

As I shared above, a tumultuous farming operation with explosive internal dynamics and drama IS NOT conducive to a successful or strong operation. Recognizing and addressing weaknesses and shortcomings will lead to a quicker failure. Some commented on another thread about a part time farm/sideline farm is not a successful model. Well, I differ with that. When a family of 4, such as mine, faces a high cost for health insurance ($22,000/year +) accompanied by high deductibles ($6550 per insured), a full time job with benefits is an advantage worth having to help cover these costs.

Sacrifices must be made by all involved. My parents could probably get a bit more rent on the farm than what I am paying them. I have also invested a lot into that farm myself, in terms of fertility, machinery, drainage, conservation practices, on site facilities, etc., not to mention nearly 3 decades of sweat equity. This is reflected in their plans for the transition of ownership after their deaths to me and my siblings.

Sorry for the "short novel" I could possibly title "My Battles and My War." I most certainly shared too much, but those who know me well, know that when a question is asked of me, there are never short, easy answers, and I typically have to lay down a foundation to reinforce my points, before I can answer the question. This certainly is one of the longest, though!

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Farmerwithmutt

02-09-2018 09:27:18




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
Consequences down the road so true. My dad didn't want me to have the farm the only thing he would except was his total control farm with an m and milk cows by hand. Eventually i gave up and moved on and started on my own and that's hard in a community that things your dad has a right to decide what you should do. I can remember being denied service having to pay twice as much as others for the same job. When i went to purchase a milk herd my dad found out and wanted me back on the home farm several people said don't but i wanted to keep it in the family. The same thing all over again my dad with the help of home town bankers locked everything up . Eventually i got fed up blackmailing him into selling the farm to me he then went to the banker and told them to sell me out .I managed to hold on had to pay cash for everything worked off farm and fought to hold on. I should have listened to what was told to me and not come back even today life isn't that easy because people know i don't have backing or family support.
My current renter might not do things i would do but he does love the land and his family so i except his decision .
If anyone thinks his son or daughter wants to farm don't put them down watch what you say to others that will influence how people treat them.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
NY 986

02-09-2018 09:11:09




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
It's a balancing act between father and son in terms of attitude and outlook. The first day of college before any instruction was given that the professor was very candid about the relationship and potential conflict between father and son and said if their was any doubt as to a smooth relationship to conduct business that any given student might want to rethink his curriculum choice before he went any further. Also, was stated that don't let family pride get in the way of doing what is best for the student.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
David G

02-09-2018 08:39:44




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
I do not think you should make them do that, it is their life, their choice.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
kyhayman

02-09-2018 08:38:03




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
Alas, my son shares no love for, heat, dust, dirt, and low wages. I'm anticipating a Boston lawyer... (4.0, Ivy league, full academic scholarship, editor of law review)

I formed a C corporation a few years ago. The Corp leases the hard assets from me and my former 'foreman' became Chief Operating Officer. When I die my significant other and my son will inherit the stock. No fuss, no muss, no fighting. The hard assets will go into trust to benefit my significant other(if she's still holding out on getting hitched), my son, and my cats. It really doesn't matter to me what they do with the stuff, its just stuff and I'll be dead and won't care. I see my obligation right now is for those I love to be provided for.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
James Howell

02-09-2018 09:04:13




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to kyhayman, 02-09-2018 08:38:03  
"The hard assets will go into trust"

Agree.

Same here.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
cjunrau

02-09-2018 08:23:47




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
make them do chores when young so they know what it is like to work, and learn how to work. Do it with them and they will enjoy it more. Give them something at say 14 years old ,ex Calf, sheep, 1 acres,. whatever you farm just part of it. it is a lot easier to have an interest in farming when you own something of it.

NUMBER ONE DON"T .....make him do dishes till 16 and leaves home while his other brothers were givin a cow at 13 and are out making money and the third Gets nothing. Made me very bitter

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
philip d

02-09-2018 08:21:29




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
I'm kind of at a wait and see stage for now. I love my son and we get along great but it seems every time we work together if it's something he doesn't want to do or he can make more money or have more fun somewhere else I'm left on my own too bad so sad. That being said he's still only 18 is working on an 1100 milking head dairy 3/4 the way on the other side of the country and is doing well. If he chooses to come home he'll have to prove he's willing to get his hands dirty and work up a sweat at home and that comes before video games and driving around than we'll have something to talk about. I just want him to do well and be happy wherever he is or whatever he's doing.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Crazy Horse

02-09-2018 07:24:55




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
Here's a musical version of the question as to keeping the boy on the farm ........ pretty cool ! There might be a You Tube ad in there first that you might have to wait for .......



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Bruce from Can.

02-09-2018 07:35:23




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to Crazy Horse, 02-09-2018 07:24:55  
After seeing that there was so many easier ways to live WW1 soldiers didn't want to go back to hard luck farms , and eck out a poor living. I am sure the same thing happened after WW 2 as well.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
rrlund

02-09-2018 08:09:35




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to Bruce from Can., 02-09-2018 07:35:23  
Ya,Dad took a factory job and bought a house in town after he came back from the war. Grandpa's health got so bad that he couldn't keep it going. Dad was the youngest of 6 and all the others had farms of their own by that time,so in 48 he came back and my grandparents moved in to town.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Bruce from Can.

02-09-2018 07:17:29




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
Well I guess I am very much one of the folks you are asking this question of. First off , I am not doing anything to keep my son "down on the farm " , I told all three of my boys not to ever think that they were saying on the farm for me, if they want to be on the farm , it is for themselves. Oldest son is going to stay on the farm , and the next two boys would rather do just about anything else but stay and work long hours and weekends on the farm. So they left. My second son likes to run equipment, and has knocked around from job to job, and some times when things get tough for him, I find some work on the farm for him. But as soon as he can , he jumps to another job, and that's ok. My youngest works in a local feed mill , steady work ,decent pay , good benefits , and a pension plan. He gets regular hours, and all the over time he wants ,works for him. So back to the son on the farm. I think we will form a ltd. and put our milk cows and quota , as well as the farm equipment and one of our farms into the ltd. and I will pass him 40% ownership for the work he has put into the farm so far , he has been with me full time for ten years on next to no pay so this isn't a gift, and his brothers are aware of what we are doing. As time goes by eldest boy can buy out my side if he likes , or my wife and I could will it to him. We still have another farm , a house lot, and some investments , so are other boys could be given some thing from this pool. What I see is , if a son isn't interested enough in the farm to come and help out at say harvest time, why should he expect to benefit from the $$ value in the farm ? My two off farm boys will have to wait till I am gone to inherit from my wife and I , and not have any claim on the farm ltd , as they were not interested in building it. In some ways, I kind of wish my oldest didn't want to farm.I would be ready to winded it up. So because he does want to farm, I started to pass much of the day to day management over to him, he will need to know how to do every thing on this farm , so he may as well start while I am here to help. We are looking hard at putting up a new barn , and that will ease the work load, and give me the chance to back away. I am 57 now and I would like to see this new barn and transition all done and working by the time I turn 60. That will give me 40 years of 7 days a week dairy farming, and I can then become a part time worker, and full time share holder. This is our plan , if we cannot pull it all together, we have two other options , downsize to what my son can do on his own, or just quit and sell out, last resort. First option is the one we , my wife and I and the oldest boy want. And as I said , the other boys have opted to not be on the farm, so the farm business is not their concern , as I am still the sole owner.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
rrlund

02-09-2018 07:00:04




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
I don't know what would have happened if my Dad hadn't said what he did to my oldest son before he passed away. Both of the boys had decided they didn't want anything to do with it and left. We were seriously thinking of selling everything and moving south to raise cattle down there. Then the oldest boy said he wanted the place. He said that Dad had told him that he always thought that he'd end up farming the place some day,so it put the spark in him. He didn't want to milk cows,that's for darned sure,but he's got two beef cows here and some cattle in the feedlot. I've told him that if he wants to own the place,he might have to wait until I die and get it when he's about 60. He said that'd be fine with him,he'd farm it when he retires.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
1946 BN IHC

02-09-2018 06:31:26




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
In addition to all that has been stated I have mised the farm. My parents because of my father's poor back health made the desission to sell out a family 150 year old family farm in 1965 when I was 12. Later on I had the opertunity to lead one of two poltery 4H clubs in the county I lived in in Ontario Canada. Yes I, even now have tmes I in my 60,s mis the farm :YET because of God's hand and leading in my life I have had a pleasent life.
To add to this my wife Brenda had at verious times said she wished she had known me earlier and that we could have been able to keep the farm, she grew up on the Guelph agricultural campis often going to the barns to feed and help with the animals.
Be as that may the start up costs today ( from 1970 to 2018) are steep. To purchase a 50 acher piece of land with house and even a sugestion of a barn would often be blocked by the powers that govern the counties: their thoughts "one can't make a livng on 50 "achers". Raising Irish Dexter Cattle it was porjected that the turn over was sufficient to thrive on.
Any way that's enough rant from me.
Have a wonderful week end all.
Wm

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
steve706

02-09-2018 07:09:37




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to 1946 BN IHC, 02-09-2018 06:31:26  
I find the powers to be statement a bit of an overreach and a bit of an exaggeration. The majority of counties and townships in Ontario wouldnít have an issue with smaller farms for the mere fact that it increases their tax base. The more people + buildings = more tax collected compared to giant acreage farms with less people and buildings on the land. Canít see why they would care what was done with the land as long as itís within the bylaws and property taxes paid.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
RCP

02-09-2018 06:14:28




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
How do you make the process fair if there is more than one child in the family? It is unlikely that they could all become "owners" of the farm, but they all have an interest in the farm.

Rich



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Bruce from Can.

02-09-2018 07:30:18




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to RCP, 02-09-2018 06:14:28  
Fair ?? fair is a place were you ride the merry go round , and they judge Chocolate cakes ! this is Business. If one kid stays on the farm and works his guts out,and increasing the assets and value of the farm as on my farm , while the other two are too busy running after girls, and partying and having fun, why should they get a equal share ? Lets decide what is "fair" and what is "equal". Then decide how everyone should be treated. My dad decided that we should all get nothing till he was dead, and then ever thing had to be sold, and money split up among the five of us evenly, seems fair, and equal. But he sold one farm to my brother at below market value, before he passed , and gave my sister a house lot. Still seem fair? Who ever said life was or had to be fair or equal ?

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
rrlund

02-09-2018 08:53:15




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to Bruce from Can., 02-09-2018 07:30:18  
"running after girls, and partying and having fun,"

Hey,come on now. You just described my youth and I'm still farming. LOL



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
old bob

02-09-2018 08:51:02




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to Bruce from Can., 02-09-2018 07:30:18  
Bruce I agree with you 100%



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Eric in IL

02-09-2018 06:03:18




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
I don't think parents should try to "sell" their kids on any certain vocation. I understand the want and need to do so especially when it comes time to pass the torch. I just don't think I could be proud of myself if I had coaxed a kid into something they weren't really wanting to do for the working years of their life.

I suppose I think like this because it is the way I was raised.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
Moresmoke

02-09-2018 06:02:02




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
Same as any other business, kick them out for a number of years, then see if they still want to come back. The old guy in charge also needs to remember it will be a team effort for a while. There are very few businesses where one person makes all the major decisions. While Junior may make a bad decision, chances are just as good he will have a stroke of genius and think of something Pops never thought of. They both need to listen to each other and work together.

I come from a fammily business background. The business will probably close when the 2nd generation retires. There are members of the 3rd generation that work there, but none that want to take over. The perspective is very different once you have distanced yourself from it. We've all seen the outfits where Pops can't understand why the youngun decided to retire from being the hired man. You know, still the youngun at 65.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
rrlund

02-09-2018 07:17:07




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to Moresmoke, 02-09-2018 06:02:02  
Ya,I've heard where some of the big successful family operations make the kids go to college then work for somebody else for two years before they'll even think of taking them in to the operation.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
544hydro

02-09-2018 05:54:33




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
living in the country and owning land was my dream. I was lucky enough to make it happen. I don't know what my sons dream will be since he's only 7. I want him to be happy and enjoy whatever it may be.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
oldproudvet

02-09-2018 05:47:23




Report to Moderator
 Re: Keeping him down on the farm in reply to showcrop, 02-09-2018 05:28:00  
Other than proper upbringing so the family truly "shares" in the farm/business being able to show a son or daughter than they can make a living and support a family is #1. Have taught Ag/diesel mech in a vocational setting in outstate MN for 35 years or so, lots of farm families have passed through...... Love of the life and the farm is one thing, but being able to support themselves and their family is paramount. Lots of success out there. So many times the kids have to leave for a while in search of themselves and figure out who they are. When they return it's amazing. The ag world, like society is changing so fast, they must remain flexible. The kids that keep there head in the sand and want to farm just like Grandpa and Dad have the least chance of success. They can slip into the farm/business but they have to be aware of how fast the world is changing, and how the volatile the politics of govt support is etc etc etc

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
[Options]  [Printer Friendly]  [Posting Help]  [Return to Forum]   [Log in to Reply]

Hop to:


TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). Expedited shipping available, just call! Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors. Compare our super low shipping rates! We have the parts you need to repair your tractor. We are a company you can trust and have generous return policies. Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651. [ About Us ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2016 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters