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Tractor Talk Discussion Forum

Re: Biggest tractor companys

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JD Seller

08-21-2013 07:21:17
208.126.196.144



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John Deere did not pass IH until in the mid 1960s. The two cylinder tractors just about took JD out of the market place. They where losing market share. They sure did not "pass" IH in 1959. The "new generation" tractors where what save JD from being an after thought in the tractor market.

I know there are a lot of Two cylinder collector that love their tractors but the fact are that JD just about rode the two cylinders too long. The two cylinder design was limiting them in the horse power they could get out of the tractors. They where starting to have reliability issues with the larger horse power two cylinders.

I know many of us cuss the JD bean counter that are currently running JD. The fact is that the management is what has made the company what it is today. The engineers have made good products but the management has made the company.

Look at IH as an example. They where a much bigger company in the mid to late 1950s. There management did not get the job done. They where going broke/out of business if Case had not bought them out.

Oliver is another example of a company that management lost. They had good equipment and innovative designs in the 1950 and early 1960s.
Then the corporate people lost the company.

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Jim Naden

08-21-2013 15:53:41
74.62.74.234



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to JD Seller, 08-21-2013 07:21:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

One correction, Case did not buy the IH Ag division. Tenneco, who owned Case at the time, made the purchase and then merged the companies.



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buickanddeere

08-21-2013 13:59:21
209.240.118.19



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to JD Seller, 08-21-2013 07:21:17  
Deere was going to introduce the four & six cylinders sooner. However they waited until the design was improved and Deere provided customers with good tractors. Where would Deere be today if the 10 series had been introduced in 1957 but they were turkeys and turned customers away from future sales. Not completely true as the 2010 did it's part to annoy customers.



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Mike Aylward

08-21-2013 10:46:34
209.152.135.126



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to JD Seller, 08-21-2013 07:21:17  
Actually, Deere did find itself passing IH in tractor sales in the latter 50's. This was talked about extensively, along with industry wide sales records, at the most recent Gathering of the Green conference held in 2012. By the late 50's the tractor market was a mature one and the tractors sold were replacement tractors for farms that were getting bigger. Deere sold about the same number of tractors but all other companies sold less due to the changing conditions. The two-cylinder tractors did keep Deere in the tractor market. When the New Generation tractors came out they took it a step further. I believe it was in 1963 that Deere overtook IH as the sales leader in ALL agricultural equipment, not just tractors. Mike

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Harvey2

08-21-2013 07:32:48
74.138.175.233



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to JD Seller, 08-21-2013 07:21:17  
JD seller:
Thanks for the comment.
What I was wanting to know was the line up of tractor companys by their market share.



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Paul

08-21-2013 08:13:50
66.60.223.232



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to Harvey2, 08-21-2013 07:32:48  
China has basically 3 manufacturers, and they would win if there were open global numbers, tho most are going to be 15 hp tractors....

Agco wins on a global stage, counting companies with semi-public books.

If you are just looking for North American companies, you will have to restate your question, as to the units manufactured, or the total sales volume, or the total units out there, etc.

Every company has a way of skewing the numbers to put themselves on top, so you likely can have your favorite color on top no matter which one you are cheering for. ;)

Paul

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Harvey2

08-21-2013 08:36:41
74.138.175.233



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to Paul, 08-21-2013 08:13:50  
Mr. Paul,"
Please read the question. I stated the companys in the 1950s.
Back then China and the other countrys in the world except Canada weren't in the playing field.



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Paul

08-21-2013 14:19:28
66.60.223.232



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to Harvey2, 08-21-2013 08:36:41  
Doesn't answer your question, but an interesting link to the hay day of tractor production in the USA 1951.

http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe50s/machines_01.html

Paul



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DaninKansas

08-21-2013 10:24:45
24.248.193.103



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 Re: Biggest tractor companys in reply to Harvey2, 08-21-2013 08:36:41  
Just guessing but given the demand for tractors after WW2 I would think a Russian company probably built more tractors than any single US company in the 1950s. The Soviet Union hardly built any (none?) tractors in the late 1930s and 1940s - then they were trying to catch up with the US.



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