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Tractor Transporting Discussion Forum

Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting

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Ralph Bauer

02-23-2012 20:56:05
75.107.19.224



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Either ones are available. Wondering what your experiences and preferences are for securing ag- related items on a trailer. Chains come in 70 and 43 grades, but I didn't see any references on either binder, just max load spec. given in the description (5400/9200/etc.)
Thanks in advance, Ralph.




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john_Bud

03-04-2012 10:44:39
173.245.138.22



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Walter Buller, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
I use the ratcheting type. I like to keep the FEL up and any implement up while tightening the tractor down. The weight on the tires helps take the squish out so I don't have to ratchet so much.



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J.Wondergem

03-01-2012 12:22:32
166.249.97.109



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to carolina plowboy, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  

Every time I see that, I think of the Guy that tightened down his [1920s JD D, I think] so tight it broke the rear axle housing.



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sflem849

02-28-2012 11:37:24
69.197.84.39



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Fixerupper, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
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Ratcheting. I bought a spare can of JB80 and put it right in the chain box with the binders. Done.

Look at the tires in this picture and tell me you can't get a ratchet to squish the tires. :lol: They were a little flat, but not that much before I started.

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jddriver

02-29-2012 19:17:16
108.79.58.170



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to sflem849, 02-28-2012 11:37:24  
why would you tighten it that tight



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Dean Olson

02-27-2012 20:23:32
98.196.66.64



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Ratcheting! Either I never learned how to get the over center tight the 1st time or they're a POS. I'd get everything tightened down then drive for a couple miles and they'd be loose.

With the ratcheting type I can get them tight the 1st time. I still check down the road a few miles and periodically the entire trip. Ratcheting type will stay tight!
I use chains on most everything. I do have some ratcheting nylon straps that I use for small stuff.

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J.Wondergem

02-27-2012 08:41:31
166.249.102.1



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Dennis Benson, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  

I personally like the over center binders. I also have a bunch of ratchet straps that I use. I don't have any China binders, so can't comment on them. Mine are all from in the late 60s when I hauled steel. I do prefer straps on some stuff I don't want to scratch. I have used the ratchet binders, but like the over centers better. I don't have any problem with them coming loose as I wrap the loose end of the chain over the lever as a safety precaution.

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Dan in North Houston

02-27-2012 07:02:35
38.100.70.66



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Years ago I had experience with both. For the record, we always called the snap over ones "boomers" and the ratchet screw ones "binders". Recently I had been using nylon straps, but decided I needed to have some ratchet binders in case I wanted to haul something on the trailer where chains would be more appropriate. I went to several trailer supply houses here in Houston and could not find the good Crosy / Lebus / made in the US boomers or binders. All they carried was made in China. This was one item that I did not want to trust to Chinese made stuff, but the salesman convinced me that the reason why they didn't carry the much more expensive made in the US stuff was that the Chinese stuff was just as good.
I used them a few times hauling a small tractor with no problems, but the first time I tried to tighten down a load of steel where there was no rubber tires to provide a little give, the screws started jumping treads. I had them pretty snug but nowheres near the point that they should have failed like that. I took them back to the dealer, who claimed they'd never had anyone complain about them. They gave me a new pair, but I don't trust them for anythiing near their supposedly rated load.
Fortunately I found a good pair of old Lebus brand binders at an antique store.

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ShepFL

02-26-2012 17:58:19
69.57.119.116



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Ditto to chevytaHOE5674 comments.
I have both but find myself using the ratching ones more and more often.

Been "smacked down" by the snap over binders but it was me not watching the kid. Told everybody at work wife clanged me with her cast iron skillet :)



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Scotc

02-26-2012 08:27:14
72.101.203.106



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
I've used both and prefer the lever binders. Especially when they hang in the shed and don't get used often. Around here (SW NE) things get coated in dust real fast, and you'd have to clean up and oil the ratchet binders every time you got them out.

I only used about a 2.5 foot cheater and can squat tires with a lever binder. The trick to keeping your teeth is to never get anything but your fingers in the path of the pipe when you are pulling it down.

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rustyfarmall

02-26-2012 07:30:07
216.248.71.224



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Fort67, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

Something like a cornhead needs to be secured with STRAPS. Leave the chains in the chain box.



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JDseller

02-25-2012 21:42:24
208.126.196.144



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
I guess too many guys never have heard of an OIL CAN!!!! I had the break over center type because Dad's ratcheting type where a real pain to use. Always stuck and you could not spin them. I then had to haul some steel tracked loaders. I needed some ratchet type binders. I bought good new ones. I took them apart before I ever used them and oiled the threads inside the ratchet body. After using them a few times and not having to mess with having the break over center type/cheater bars. I sold my break over center type to my brother. I have not used anything but the ratchet type for ten years or more. I carry a can of spray multi lube. I just make sure the treads are kept lubed. They are much safer to use then the break over center type. Plus when you check them during the haul they are much easier to just give a few cranks when the load settles in.

Used to get machinery broken because some idiot would take a six foot pipe and bull down on piece of equipment that was setting solid on the trailer/truck floor. I had to replace four of the six gear cases on a JD 693 corn head that a supper trucker broke binding them down with break over center binders and a long cheater pipe. Cost him over four thousand dollars ten years ago. So if I receive any machinery that was bound down with break over center binders I check it over real close.

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caterpillar guy

02-25-2012 04:05:51
24.247.25.227



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
I do as Old does. I put snaps on first then use the ratchets to finish tightening. This way you don't need a pipe and things will stay tight. Now for the making the tires squish. I can make tires beg for mercy with ratchet binders if you use them right. Start by hooking all chains on, then all binders on, latch your snaps this takes most of the slack up then start pulling down the ratchets. I have pulled tractors down 2-4 inches on the rear by letting some air out and pulling the ratchet binders down to get down to legal height. The tires can't have so much air out the side walls rub inside, or the tires can be damaged though.

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430WLPG

02-24-2012 19:13:32
184.95.27.26



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Get some of both, but you'll like the overcenter better along with a cheater pipe, they work pretty good if your a big guy



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Ralph Bauer

02-24-2012 21:07:32
75.107.19.224



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to 430WLPG, 02-24-2012 19:13:32  
Hahaha, too kind to a big guy like me...(six five and 295)...thanks for the advice!



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marloweg

02-24-2012 19:12:30
207.118.166.127



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
over center!and a 5 ft. pipe a lot faster.ratcheting suck in winter rust and freezing



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1206SWMO

02-24-2012 16:55:09
67.142.179.20



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Call me lucky but I"ve used over center load binders for 45 years now with no problems....Believe it or not I"ve also had the same cheater pipe for those 45 years...When I lose it I"m done..

I do know several people that let a cheater pipe get away and are now missing some front teeth..



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showcrop

02-24-2012 16:18:46
75.67.231.80



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Lloyd in South Carolina, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
One draw back to the ratcheting type is that in dusty conditions they can get bound up to where you can't get them to move either way. Other than that they are generally preferred to the over center type.



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jddriver

02-24-2012 18:06:16
108.79.58.170



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to showcrop, 02-24-2012 16:18:46  
I dont know that they are preferred but the screw type are deffinitely harder to use and less convienent.I dont like them been doing this for 35 years



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old

02-24-2012 13:48:30
209.86.226.19



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
I use and have used both in the past 30 plus years I have been a trucker. I prefer to use both types at the same time. The over center ones go on first then the ratcheting one goes on so as to add the load to the over center type. I also tie ALL the over center type so they can not come unlocked. Now if I where going to go out and buy a bunch of them new I would only buy the ratcheting type since they hold better and you can get them tighter then the over center type and in the long run safer for both the load and the person working with them

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Super Trucker

02-24-2012 13:25:48
99.23.113.86



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Check your local laws . Here it is not legal to haul a rubber tire machine with snap binders. After I had a snap binder explode on me and cutting a 2"GASH on my head I promptly took a torch to every one I owned!!! I then went and bought ratchet binders. Oh not to mention watching the cheater pipe go flying after it slips from your hands .



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jddriver

02-24-2012 18:08:16
108.79.58.170



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Super Trucker, 02-24-2012 13:25:48  
over center binders are still legal.Who ever told you that has not read the green book.



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smallercrawler

02-24-2012 09:31:54
166.82.254.181



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Ratcheting!!



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DScott

02-24-2012 08:38:48
70.43.242.34



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
As others have stated the over center type binders are sometimes hard to get locked down. I also always worried about them popping loose unless they were wired or tied down. With the ratcheting binders you can crank them down until the chain is tighter than a banjo string if you want to and they will stay there. Ratcheting binders are all I use now.



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Mike M

02-24-2012 08:24:04
24.140.0.120



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Ratcheting for me !!!

Others are too tight or too loose and then heard of too many horror stories from cheater pipes cracking em in the head and loads being released fast when you flip the binder off crushing guys.



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730d se

02-24-2012 08:22:36
68.189.186.87



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Ratcheting all the way. You never have to keep moving the chain link setting to get the proper pull. You just rachet until it is where you want it.
Always stop and check load within a short distance. Sometimes things have gotten lose in spite of our best efforts.
Again, with rachets, just give a few turns and it is tight and ready to roll, rubber tires or not.



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rustyfarmall

02-24-2012 06:46:22
216.248.71.224



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to chris5, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
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If the machine or implement is on rubber tires, I like the over center type because I can actually get the tires to "squish", and then I KNOW it won't go anywhere. I do use a 4 foot cheater on the handle.

If the implement is NOT on tires, then the ratcheting type is the only choice, or even better is a ratcheting strap.



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Ken Macfarlane

02-28-2012 13:46:05
142.166.168.2



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to rustyfarmall, 02-24-2012 06:46:22  
I'm different I guess, I like the over-centre type, but I don't use a cheater pipe because I'm the guy that has to undo them too. With cheater you can watch guys half pulling their trailer apart chaining stuff down. On a rough road and a long trailer you can break stuff doing that. Instead I chain my loads so they aren't going to slack up much, recheck early in the trip and always wire the handles down.

I've used the ratchet type hauling excavators but they get so rusty up here in the winter salt its a pain.

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chevytaHOE5674

02-24-2012 05:30:53
74.221.61.254



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
Go ratcheting if at all possible. With normal over center binders sometimes they will either be too tight or not tight enough, with no chain link in between to hook too.



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ericlb

02-24-2012 04:48:56
12.189.32.36



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 Re: Load binder: ratcheting vs. non ratcheting in reply to Ralph Bauer, 02-23-2012 20:56:05  
ratcheting are beter, and easier to use, also cost a little more, ive used both, when i haul heavy stuff, [ one of the companies dozers weighs 100,000 lbs, by itself] the ratcheting ones are easier to get tight and the seem to stay tighter without having to retention as often when i stop to inspect the chains and binders



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