Yesterday's Tractor Co. We Have the Tractor Parts You Need
Click Here or call 800-853-2651 
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 
Marketplace
Tractor Manuals
Tractor Parts
Classified Ads
Photo Ads

Community
Discussion Forums
Project Journals
Tractor Town
Your Stories
Show & Pull Guide
Events Calendar
Hauling Schedule

Galleries
Tractor Photos
Implement Photos
Vintage Photos
Help Identify
Parts & Pieces
Stuck & Troubled
Vintage Ads
Community Album
Photo Ad Archives

Research & Info
Articles
Tractor Registry
Tip of the Day
Safety Cartoons
Tractor Values
Serial Numbers
Tune-Up Guide
Paint Codes
List Prices
Production Nbrs
Tune-Up Specs
Torque Values
3-Point Specs
Glossary

Miscellaneous
Tractor Games
Just For Kids
Virtual Show
Museum Guide
Memorial Page
Feedback Form

Yesterday's Tractors Facebook Page

Related Sites
Tractor Shed
TractorLinks.com
Ford 8N/9N Club
Today's Tractors
Garden Tractors
Classic Trucks
Kountry Life
Enter your email address to receive our newsletter!

subscribe
unsubscribe
  
Tool Talk Discussion Forum

How to figure angle iron strength?

Author  [Modern View]
kent_in_kc

10-27-2009 08:41:59
208.82.108.19



Report to Moderator

Good morning, fellas. I am working with some angle iron, making supports for working on tractors, cars, etc. and need to be able to figure the correct type of steel to use.

My choices range from angle legs of 1.5" to 2.0" wide and from 1/8" to 3/16" thick, assuming both legs are the same width (no 2" x 3") and most lengths will be between 1ft and 3 ft.

I"m not so concerned with compression or stretching or even torsion forces, mostly lateral bending. I don"t want to get a load up and have a piece of angle fold and collapse.

For example, one of my questions is: is a 3/16" thick piece of 1.5" x 1.5" angle stronger than a 1/8" thick piece of 2" x 2"?

I realize I may not be framing my question properly, but any information of links you could provide to give some non-engineer"s basic rules would be appreciated.

Thanks for your time.

[Reply]   [No Email]
KF

10-30-2009 10:39:41
165.252.92.98



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
An angle is good for structural framing, but is not good for any lifting type applications if that is what you have in mind. It is prone to twisting failure. What is used for lifting type applications are channels, I-beams, wide flanges and rectangular tubing. These too need support from twisting if the span is large, but they are much less prone to it than an angle. Angle is used as a component in some structural trusses, but it is only a part of a complete load bearing or support assembly. I would recommend tubing or I-beams for overhead lifting applications.

[Reply]  [No Email]
T_Bone

10-29-2009 16:27:11
64.57.205.153



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
Hi Kent,

When I built my custom hitch, GN/5th, I set up a test to prove my design. Tests were preformed with a new 1-ton and 2-ton hydraulic jacks as I wanted a rated capacity of 4000/lbs on the pin. My test plate length was 34" or the spread of the frame rail center line on a 02 F350 DRW.
Using a 3/4"x8"x34" plate with center 3/4"x8"x12" bolted plate located in the center of the 34"span. With less than 2000# I could easy deflect the 1-1/2" plate thickness.
Using two, 4"x34" channels with a center 3/4"x8"x12" plate, I could hold 4000# of center pin weight with a 3/8" deflection.
My final design was two 5"x34" channels with a 3/4"x8"x"12" center plate with zero deflection at 4000/lbs pin weight.
In general terms, from the above, the depth of beam is more important than material thickness from a top deflection force.

From a side deflection force, then one would increase material thickness and width.

T_Bone

[Reply]  [No Email]
kent_in_kc

10-29-2009 15:42:22
208.82.108.19



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
Thanks fellas for all the feedback. I appreciate your help. When in doubt, beef it out.



[Reply]  [No Email]
Puddles

10-28-2009 17:59:19
24.113.88.22



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
Here is a “Deflection Calculator for Square Tubing”. May help some of you when designing projects.

You’ll have to copy and paste this link, because I still haven’t figured out how to post links here. :oops:
http://metalgeek.com/static/deflection.php



[Reply]  [No Email]
moonlite37

10-28-2009 18:16:12
204.8.188.82



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to Puddles, 10-28-2009 17:59:19  
Did you ever hear of the S W A G system? It works quite well if you consider the sectional modulus of each part. S illy Wild A## Guess



[Reply]  [No Email]
JMS/.MN

10-28-2009 17:29:53
209.237.107.155



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
Google Cofer mfg in KS for ideas.



[Reply]  [No Email]
bc

10-27-2009 16:33:36
69.148.145.104



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
The steel suppliers won't help you. They don't want to get into liability issues over providing you with engineering help. They worry it may fall on you and hurt or kill you. Same problem with the hydraulic suppliers. Since you aren't building the Eiffel tower, overkill is cheap. If it looks kinda rickety, then it probably is. Can't go wrong if you upgrade to some 4" square tubing with tubing or channel iron gussets/braces, all heavy wall stuff of course. Some supports going in all 4 directions is needed in case the car/tractor rolls on ya. Find some tubing that will slide in the other to make it telescoping.

There have been some people posting pics of their tractor stands in the archives around here.

[Reply]  [No Email]
Puddles

10-27-2009 12:06:52
24.113.88.22



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
Kent this may be of some use to you for your project.



[Reply]  [No Email]
135 Fan

10-27-2009 11:44:10
68.149.56.30



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
There should be a chart somewhere or a steel supplier should have some info. That said, I wouldn't be using any 1/8" for a tractor stand. For stuff like that it's better to over build it than to under build it. I'd try googling steel strength or something along those lines. Dave



[Reply]  [No Email]
Flurette Farm

10-27-2009 09:10:47
64.91.12.230



Report to Moderator
 Re: How to figure angle iron strength? in reply to kent_in_kc, 10-27-2009 08:41:59  
I think if you check Machinery Handbook it give you the correct numbers and formulas that you are looking for. Don't go on someones guess and get yourself or someone else hurt or killed. Reme,ber there are numerous types of steel. The type you normally find around is "merchant quality" which is the lowest. If you don't know what it is consider it "merchant". Good luck.



[Reply]  [No Email]
[Options]  [Printer Friendly]  [Posting Help]  [Return to Forum]   [Add a Reply]

Hop to:
TRACTOR   PARTS TRACTOR   MANUALS
Same-Day Shipping! Most of our stocked parts ship the same day you order (M-F).  Expedited shipping available, just call!  Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors.  Compare our super low shipping rates!  We have the parts you need to repair your tractor.  We are a Company you can trust and have generous return policies!   Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651. [ More Info ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2014 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters