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Restoration & Repair Tips Board

Repairing crack in lower loader frame

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farmerbob02

03-22-2014 06:24:57
68.103.10.239



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Guys,
Looking for some advice on fixing a crack on the lower loader frame on a GB loader. It is on the horizontal frame member that carries the supports the main upright at the bottom where the main loader arm pivots from at the top back to the tractor axle. I have heard to weld the crack then fish plate. Then some say to weld completely around with 30 degree angles at the end with rounded corners and some say leave the ends open, just weld top and bottom. Some say to space weld and leave gaps between the welds on the seams. Some say to weld the crack and just bolt the fish plates. Don't know what is right or wrong for sure, but most of this info has been on vehicle frames not loaders frames. Needing real world farm repair advice. Any help is appreciated and pictures would be greatly appreciated.

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rrlund

03-23-2014 09:34:58
162.250.26.144



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to farmerbob02, 03-22-2014 06:24:57  
Some of the strongest joints I've ever joined,I bolted a plate on then welded it. The frame of my tri-axle gooseneck trailer was rusted real bad at the back. I turned it upside down,cut it off at the center axle and got some new I beam. I butted them together,welded the joint,drilled and bolted a plate to both sides,then welded the plates all the way around. Been quite a few years now,not a trace of a crack anywhere.

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farmerbob02

03-22-2014 18:38:37
68.103.10.239



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to farmerbob02, 03-22-2014 06:24:57  
According to my research a flitch plate is used on wood beams, but a fish plate is used on steel items with the example of railroad tracks. Guess its where your from, but flitch plate or fish plate, they serve the same purpose, just on different materials or applications. Terminology aside, still looking for ideas.
This post was edited by farmerbob02 at 18:40:12 03/22/14.

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dpendzic

03-22-2014 19:45:34
24.184.14.235



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to farmerbob02, 03-22-2014 18:38:37  
Bob--a picture of the crack on the frame would help a lot to figure out the best repair method



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bison

03-23-2014 12:08:37
69.168.144.133



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to dpendzic, 03-22-2014 19:45:34  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to seex2



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farmerbob02

03-22-2014 18:32:59
68.103.10.239



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to farmerbob02, 03-22-2014 06:24:57  
..
This post was edited by farmerbob02 at 18:39:33 03/22/14.



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showcrop

03-22-2014 14:30:00
75.67.231.80



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to farmerbob02, 03-22-2014 06:24:57  
Most fish plates that I have seen have the ends taper down to about 1/3 of the full width. My understanding is that a flitch plate is one that is used to strengthen a part of a wood beam.



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bill mart

03-22-2014 16:00:06
69.204.65.189



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to showcrop, 03-22-2014 14:30:00  
this what wiki says too:
A flitch beam (or flitched beam) is a compound beam used in the construction of houses, decks, and other primarily wood-frame structures. Typically, the flitch beam is made up of a steel plate sandwiched between two wood beams, the three layers being held together with bolts. In that common form it is sometimes referenced as a steel flitch beam. Further alternating layers of wood and steel can be used to produce an even stronger beam. The metal plate(s) within the beam are known as flitch plates.

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dpendzic

03-22-2014 18:12:46
24.184.14.235



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to bill mart, 03-22-2014 16:00:06  
Exactly right Bill--a flitch beam is generally a flitch plate strengthening a timber beam,
Generically a flitch plate is a metal plate added to something to increase strength.We have actually added them to steel,concrete and composite structures.
Fish plate is certainly not the correct term for this application on a steel support.
Local jargon sometimes changes the meaning of terms depending on the locale. Such as masonry and masonary

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JMS/.MN

03-22-2014 10:55:48
209.237.125.241



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to farmerbob02, 03-22-2014 06:24:57  
When fishplating, leave the ends open. Welding four sides.....no place for stress to leave, will crack again. BTDT on JD 800 swather header arms.



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dpendzic

03-22-2014 11:19:10
24.184.14.235



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 Re: Repairing crack in lower loader frame in reply to JMS/.MN, 03-22-2014 10:55:48  
all the FLITCH PLATES I have designed for bridge beams have always been filet welded on all four sides--but do the top and bottom, let it cool and then do the ends.I did my Ford tractor this way and it has held well--i did do full penetration groove weld on the cracks first and ground them down flush
Fish plates are generally only found on splices to rail road tracks



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