Yesterday's Tractor Co. Restoration Quality Tractor Parts
Click Here or call 800-853-2651 
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 
Marketplace
Tractor Manuals
Tractor Parts
Classified Ads
Photo Ads

Community
Discussion Forums
Project Journals
Tractor Town
Your Stories
Show & Pull Guide
Events Calendar
Hauling Schedule

Galleries
Tractor Photos
Implement Photos
Vintage Photos
Help Identify
Parts & Pieces
Stuck & Troubled
Vintage Ads
Community Album
Photo Ad Archives

Research & Info
Articles
Tractor Registry
Tip of the Day
Safety Cartoons
Tractor Values
Serial Numbers
Tune-Up Guide
Paint Codes
List Prices
Production Nbrs
Tune-Up Specs
Torque Values
3-Point Specs
Glossary

Miscellaneous
Tractor Games
Just For Kids
Virtual Show
Museum Guide
Memorial Page
Feedback Form

Yesterday's Tractors Facebook Page

Related Sites
Tractor Shed
TractorLinks.com
Ford 8N/9N Club
Today's Tractors
Garden Tractors
Classic Trucks
Kountry Life
Enter your email address to receive our newsletter!

subscribe
unsubscribe
  
Tractor Pulling Discussion Forum

need machinists advice

Welcome Guest, Log in or Register
Author  [Modern View]
clampdaddy

03-13-2014 17:39:25
50.8.151.226



Report to Moderator

We have a lathe at work that I play with once in a while but I am nowhere close to being a machinist. I have to turn something that I don't want to mess up so I could use some advice on the set up. I'm going to be turning a belt pulley that's roughly 12.5 inches in diameter. How fast should I run it?
This post was edited by clampdaddy at 17:39:57 03/13/14.




[Log in to Reply]   [No Email]
clampdaddy

03-14-2014 21:58:49
166.137.208.42



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to terry hayes, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

While I was working on my project during my lunch break I was looking around our shop and seeing all of these great tools that never get used. The lathe, a mill that will do verticle and horizontal, a big trip hammer, forge, etc, etc and thinking what a shame it was that we didn't have any guys that really know how to run them anymore. Just then my boss came through and told me to get back to the lunch table, take as long as I wanted on my project and to consider it on the job training. Pretty cool of him.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
clampdaddy

03-14-2014 19:01:39
166.137.208.48



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
Thanks guys. I started slow (75 rpm) to knock down the spot I built up, and then I went up to 158 to finish it off. The top came out nice but when I trued up the inside I found three little hairline cracks, beneath the area I built up so I have to decide how to go about fixing them. Now that the pulley is trued up on the outside I'd hate to warp it with another heating sequence. All of the guys in the shop don't think they'd ever be a problem at the low rpm's that it'll be turning but I don't know if I can get used to the idea of having cracks in something spinning so close to my right foot.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
mlpankey

03-14-2014 19:39:55
98.68.191.152



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-14-2014 19:01:39  
Thanks for asking a legitimate question. Its a shame that a legitimate question only gets six replies. Makes you wonder where all the expert machinist are doesnt it



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
overyourhead

03-15-2014 11:53:27
71.90.56.42



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to mlpankey, 03-14-2014 19:39:55  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

Yeah, because your expert response was backed up by showing the math on how to figure out surface feet per minute and referring to validated charts such as those published in the machinists handbook.
Get a life troll. The previous responses were 100 x more valuable than the two bits you posted. Some expert you are.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
elkcagg

03-14-2014 10:33:00
32.138.191.225



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
Safety is your #1 priority here. Manually operated lathes are probably the most dangerous machine tools in any shop. That being said you want as rigid of a setup as possible. Are you using a carbide inserted tool or High speed steel? Machinists go by Surface footage on the cutting tool charts. General SF for HSS is 60-100 for low carbon steels & cast irons. Carbide can be run 2-3 times faster. To convert SF to rpms take SF/.262/Dia of tool or workpiece. 60 rpms on a 12.5 dia is 196 SF.

[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
RD560

03-14-2014 05:26:05
67.58.246.18



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
depends on how much your chucking on, how rough the surface is and if there is any interupted cuts, what kind of cutting tool you have. If I had plenty to chuck on, I would probably run a little faster than 60 rpm, maybe more like a 100, because when the diameter is big a little momentum can help keep chatter down. Just make sure your first cut gets beneath the scale of the cast iron



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
dblair

03-14-2014 04:52:58
67.172.202.153



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
60 rpm using this site for reference littlemachineshop.com/Reference/CuttingSpeeds.php
This post was edited by Dblair at 04:54:19 03/14/14.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
clampdaddy

03-13-2014 19:57:28
50.8.151.226



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
Thanks guys. I'll errr on the side of caution and stay on the slow side.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
clampdaddy

03-13-2014 18:02:06
50.8.151.226



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to H-66, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
All I can say for sure is that I torch tested a spot and it appears to be some type of cast iron. Not very hard. I used a burr to gouge out a crack prior to welding and it cut like butter.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
high octane

03-13-2014 19:26:16
166.216.130.26



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-13-2014 18:02:06  
you can spin it fast or slow to cut cast iron. just do a test spot, sharp bit, make sure your straight in the chuck. its kinda trial n error for first few mins. youll be fine, just take your time.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
mlpankey

03-14-2014 06:50:21
152.85.8.38



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to high octane, 03-13-2014 19:26:16  
X 2 on high octane. The faster you cut cast iron the easier it is to stay in tolerance.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
mlpankey

03-14-2014 06:45:36
152.85.8.38



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to high octane, 03-13-2014 19:26:16  
X 2 on high octane.



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
mattwillson

03-13-2014 17:51:46
24.114.73.203



Report to Moderator
 Re: need machinists advice in reply to clampdaddy, 03-13-2014 17:39:25  
What material are we dealing with? With that diameter, I'd say run it as slow as the machine will go, that's a lot of feet per minute



[Log in to Reply]  [No Email]
[Options]  [Printer Friendly]  [Posting Help]  [Return to Forum]   [Log in to Reply]

Hop to:

TRACTOR   PARTS TRACTOR   MANUALS
Same-Day Shipping! Most of our stocked parts ship the same day you order (M-F).  Expedited shipping available, just call!  Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors.  Compare our super low shipping rates!  We have the parts you need to repair your tractor.  We are a Company you can trust and have generous return policies!   Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651. [ More Info ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2014 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters