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Ford 9N, 2N & 8N Discussion Forum
Show Parts for Model:

Redneck Body Work

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Royse

07-16-2014 19:44:07
69.36.49.186



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I don't mind priming and painting, but sanding is miserable, dirty work.

So I try to minimize body fillers and things that cause dust.

Here's my version of "redneck bodywork" filling in a couple rust holes.

I braze them shut. If need be I flatten them with a wooden
"spoon" while hot. These were close enough I thought.

They were about a 1/4 inch by 1/2 inch each roughly.

It has turned out well in the past, hopefully it will this time too.

I'll still have to sand it down a bit, but a lot less dust and won't fall out!

This is the lower portion of the dogleg, bolt to the tractor goes

in the hole through the side on the bottom right of the 2nd picture.



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Royse

07-17-2014 20:07:52
69.36.49.186



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Be glad to help any way I can Colin.

Here's a link to some more of my "redneck work" if anyone has time

to kill. This truck was painted with Valspar Farmall red tractor paint.

None of the sheet metal was replaced, it was all repaired.

The engine was donated from a 1979 to replace the '89 V6.

The spray in bed liner was done with a $7 "sand blaster".

Sorry the slideshow does not show the pictures in order.

1989 Dodge

Money Pit, I have a soup can nailed to the wall to hold my pencils.

Does that count? LOL

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Colin King

07-17-2014 19:29:27
67.233.245.140



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
That is really nice! I've never brazed, but when I get to that point, I'll have to pick your brain.

Colin, MN



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Ed Douglas

07-17-2014 20:04:22
192.182.211.11



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Colin King, 07-17-2014 19:29:27  
Yeah.....me too Royce....nice job!!......gonna be picking your brain on the 2n.....right after the Hi Crop conversion!!



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Tall T

07-17-2014 19:24:11
24.108.0.163



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
[quote="Royse"](quoted from post at 17:14:07 07/17/14) "The rubber end goes against your shoulder like a gun"

Rubber end? Wow, I've been doing it the hard way!

I just made mine out of rebar! :lol:
Ah yes . . .

the bed of nails path to enlightenment. :D
Nice non slip rebar ones!

Just finished utility prepping my wheel disks. One of my favorite tools for a multitude of reasons is Fine steel wool -- not "very fine", or "medium". One of the reasons is that it penetrates depressions in the castings to dull and etch the previous paint there, better than sandpaper does and I think with less dust too. The steel dust from the wool all falls.
This post was edited by Tall T at 19:31:08 07/17/14.

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Royse

07-17-2014 17:14:07
69.36.49.186



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
"The rubber end goes against your shoulder like a gun"

Rubber end? Wow, I've been doing it the hard way!

I just made mine out of rebar! :lol:



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Royse

07-17-2014 16:59:58
69.36.49.186



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Tim, it takes some practice, but no its not hard to learn.

And it is relatively cheap. It can be done with a very small MAP

gas/oxygen torch kit like this one. Link

You can also do small welding jobs with one of these torches,
but you can use metal patches and braze them in place, so

you are using metal as you said you prefer. That's actually how
I was taught to put metal patches on a car. Newer cars don't
like it much though, the metal warps to easily from the heat.

Tractors are old and heavy enough that they're fine.

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Tall T

07-17-2014 16:53:14
24.108.0.163



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Sorry, wasn't my place to comment.
This post was edited by Tall T at 20:46:34 07/17/14 4 times.



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Tim23

07-17-2014 16:37:26
166.137.10.115



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Ive been needing to do some sheet metal work to my 8n and was wondering how to do it. Seems like everyone has their own method. I would like to use metal, but dont currently have a welder. Is learning how to braize hard?



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Royse

07-17-2014 16:35:21
69.36.49.186



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Thanks for the compliments guys. I appreciate the tips too!

I used to use lead also, that's where I got the idea
for using the wooden "spoon" on the brass.

One other thing I use, for fiberglass mat, is tin foil.

Cut the mat to fit, lay it in the foil, soak it with the liquid then
use the foil to put it in place and fold the foil around the edge of
the panel being repaired to hold it in place. A soft, small rubber
squeegee can be used on the outside of the foil to push out air
pockets and get it very smooth. Keeps the hands cleaner too!

On the other side of that coin, I briefly worked for a guy that
used that metal foil tape to cover holes, then bondo'd over it.

He was just reselling them so he didn't care.
His business wasn't around long.

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Tall T

07-17-2014 16:07:14
24.108.0.163



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Nice work, expertly done!
Hate to tell you but true redneck bodywork would involve stuffing holes with steel wool and adding bondo. :D
What I like about brass is that in the process you build up thin and weakened areas. I'm sure you'll scratch that brass up well before primer.

With bigger body metal holes I like the method that was taught to me. You depress the damaged area, cut a piece of metal to lay within it, spot the patch in place and braze all around the edge of the patch only. Just a thin skin of filler levels the surface.

I like that waxed paper tip Glenn!

Terry

P.S.

Here's a body work tool I made for brazing on metal patches.

The rubber end goes against your shoulder like a gun would and the drill bit end holds the patch against the body panel where needed leaving both hands free to braze. Nothing new there I guess. :)

This post was edited by Tall T at 16:40:32 07/17/14 4 times.

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Charles Krammin

07-17-2014 07:56:57
69.174.184.231



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Royce, I use fiberglass the way you braze. Rasp it down, then bondo to fill in inperfection. Did it 2N by battery sides and bottom of dogleg on 600.
Still looks acceptable after 4 years.
Charles Krammin SW MI



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Glenn D

07-17-2014 13:14:03
24.114.65.82



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Charles Krammin, 07-17-2014 07:56:57  
Don't forget waxed paper for the bondo. JB weld fiberglass and whatnot. you can shape and smooth with bare hands and then peel it off when it's almost hard.

Use to pick and file holes in cars with lead :shock: way back.. still alive but my extra toes get itchy

Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see



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NNP

07-17-2014 06:06:48
66.66.112.196



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
nice work

hate sanding too, and I don't braze as well as you.

Another trick is to use JB weld as the initial filler.

It's stronger than bondo and more importantly...

you apply it, sit there patiently until it just starts to harden,

then knead it to the contours you need with wettened fingers.

very little sanding then, after the final curing



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soundguy

07-17-2014 05:56:03
108.112.172.117



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
Nice braze job!



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Money Pit

07-17-2014 05:08:08
12.155.244.130



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
dude; that aint redneck! not a lick of duct tape or a soup can to be found anywhere.



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ericlb

07-17-2014 04:53:29
67.142.161.19



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 Re: Redneck Body Work in reply to Royse, 07-16-2014 19:44:07  
looks good and faster than making a steel patch panel for there too



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