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Ford 9N, 2N & 8N Discussion Forum
Show Parts for Model:

Is gas cutoff story la myth?

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Roy Warren

04-16-2018 05:26:17




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Ive always heard that you should cut off the fuel cutoff when you finish using the tractor or the gas will get into the oil pan and contaminate the oil. I find nothing in the manuals to support this. It seems its purpose is so you can shut off the fuel so you can clean out the sediment bowl. Seems the floats in the carb would prevent flow to the carb when it is full. Also, Im not sure how fuel could make its way to the oil pan from the carb. What do you think. As smart as Henry Ford was did he overlook this?

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Caryc

04-18-2018 12:50:42




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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So...what are you doing on a "crappy" 9-2-8N forum?



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hd6gtom

04-18-2018 12:10:15




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Yep when I was running those crappy 2-9-8 n fords for the neighbor in the 1960's the fuel had to be shut off every night. If you didn't it was a sure bet the darn things would not start the next morning. Even if you did shut off the fuel they were a problem starting.



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henryv11

04-18-2018 06:42:02




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I had it happen om my MD 10-20 tractor once.



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cowdog

04-18-2018 04:38:39




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I never thought I would say this, but I miss the days of the which is best. Volt or amp meter argument.



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Walston

04-18-2018 01:20:59




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I hope spring gets here soon, everyone's cabin fever is showing. LOL 4 pages on whether to shut off the gas, it is kind of funny. I always shut mine off and let the engine run until it stops. Thus, I have this never flooded the crank case on my 2N.
However I have a 2006 Snapper lawn mower, one of those red rear engine jobs. Same set up as our N's. Tank is above the engine, gravity feed. One spring ~2009, I went to start it and the motor would try to turn, but it could not turn over. I thought the battery was dead. Turned out the crank case was flooded with gasoline. It didn't even have a fuel shut off valve, it does now, LOL

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Kirk-NJ

04-18-2018 01:18:40




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Not a myth. I've had it happen to me years ago on an 8n. Gas in the case will thin the oil so your oil pressure will drop. When a tractor that normally runs at about 20 on the oil pressure gauge than drop to about 2 the next day you know something ain't right. Luckily caught it in time.



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Royse

04-17-2018 19:43:40




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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Still got the hole in the dash? I'm not sure what all models/years had that. My '46 A did and '53 50 does. So did my '54 60.



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wellmax99

04-17-2018 19:15:59




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I have an old TO35 Ferguson, I always cut the gas valve off,
Most times it will not leak, but every once in a while it will,
If it does you can normally smell fuel odor, just pull air inlet hose off and drain the fuel before you try to start engine,

In my book its just not worth taking a chance on lt leaking

I understand they even make an automatic fuel cutoff valve, you wire it to the ignition circuit so when you turn off the ignition, it turns off the fuel line valve,

My luck in time it would start leaking, so I just cut off valve myself,

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R Geiger

04-17-2018 18:37:03




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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My two cylinder JD has a sediment bowl and shut not unlike my 8n's. I shut it off because the stem leaks, and it only get ran a few times a year.



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Royse

04-17-2018 18:24:56




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
"The only tractor engine I can think of that this would be possible is any two cylinder John Deere engine."

JD even ran the shutoff valve handle up through the dash so you could shut it off from the seat of the tractor.

Most are just empty holes now, since the sediment bowl has been replaced, but the hole is still marked.

It really PO'd me on a Briggs and Stratton once. Hydro-locked right after a rebuild.

I had a Farmall BN that also leaked gas into the oil.

It had bad enough rings to leak it all into the oil and not hydro-lock.

Luckily, I noticed that the crankcase was over full.

It certainly happens. I personally think it happens now more than it used to.

I don't believe that's because of ethanol fuel so much as how these old tractors are used.

More specifically, the lack there of.

We never turned the fuel off on our JD 2 cylinders when I was a kid.

They were used almost daily.
Now, we turn it off every time but they're only used a few times a year.

And then there is the difference in parts quality too. Both needle AND seat.

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Tall T

04-17-2018 09:53:53




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
JMOR,

Good stuff;will put on file and perform the test.

Thanks



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JMOR

04-17-2018 09:46:16




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to seePut about 1 inch of water in a 16 OZ water bottle, then fill to about 3/4 full with gasoline, shake well, let set/settle for an hour +/- and see if water/separation level is still 1 inch. If still 1 inch, then ethanol free, if level at separation point increased, the fuel has ethanol in it. Google for pictures. I have performed this test more than once....it works. It is simple.

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Tall T

04-17-2018 09:17:05




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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Market,

Thanks, I'll keep that in mind!

T



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Greg (2N) TX

04-17-2018 05:59:16




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Well I guess this thread separated the perfect float valve setters from the realists who who like a little insurance.
Greg



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Hobo,NC

04-17-2018 05:24:13




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Shut'N the fuel off is not a natural thang its something that becomes natural to ya with repetition its sort of like locking your front door when you go in at night. For all practical porous the door will stay shut even if you don't lock it...

When I got my first Harley I knew from watching everyone kick there arse off they were temperamental. They learned fast to turn the fuel off when they shut it down I spec folks with hand crank tractors learned that also... I can tell you from experience after you kicked your arse off for 30 min. it became repetition to turn the fuel ON when you went to start your scooter :)....
Its sum'N you have to make yourself learn to do it only takes one bad experience to go into training mode... I started my career with old timers they had devised some neat tricks to overcome there lack of resources modern technology has eroded it away...
Something as simple as installing a fuel pump they would install the pump but leave it loose them manually rock the pump till it primed the system. Lack of resources like a battery charger are weak 6V systems that did not allow them to be able to crank on it till it picked up the fuel...

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Tim PloughNman Daley

04-17-2018 03:53:28




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
You have your answer as shown by all the replies. I'll just add this from the original '9N INSTRUCTION BOOK': "When tractor is to be idle for 30 days or more, drain the entire fuel system including the gasoline tank. Fuel should be removed through the bottom of carburetor, with Sediment Bulb Valve on "reserve" (means all the way fully open). Gasoline, when stored, forms a gum or wax which has a tendency to clog up the small pores and openings in the carburetor. For the same reason, do not use which has been stored for more than 60 days." The debate on ethanol mucking up these old systems will go on forever, and there is no need to run a Premium grade gasoline in these engines. The exception may be if one has an optional Sherman Hi-Compression aluminum head. As we see by the diagram of the Fuel Sediment Bulb Assembly, there is only one part that is essentially the working, or mechanical device and that is the valve stem. There is a seal and washer in it, and that is the piece that becomes worn and/or torn over use and needs to be replaced as leaking will occur. I've had some newer aftermarket valve stems that used cheap vinyl for the seal that failed out of the box. A new valve stem, p/n APN-9194, sells for about $6 and is much cheaper than buying a whole new sediment bulb assembly. Henry Ford was a frugal man, but with a very limited education. He couldn't read a blueprint, and left the technical side of things to his engineers. His only requirements were to build things as cheap as possible so as to make this products available to the average American consumer. He had certain stipulations, but had nothing to do with technicalities. If you are still a non-believer after all that has been said here, then take coffee can and place it underneath the carb, leave the valve stem open 2 turns, and leave for a few weeks, or a month. Check can every week and then check oil and report back.


FORD TRACTOR SEDIMENT BULB & VALVE STEM :

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Tall T

04-16-2018 23:35:46




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
While we're on the subject . . .

Last month I put premium grade gas in the tractor and the next day, my valve went from being so loose I could turn it with one finger against my little knob pointer, to so hard to turn it had me worried.

So as people here said to conclude, I also concluded it was ethanol in the fuel. But the service station assured me there was zero ethanol in their fuel — which may or may not be true I guess.

Anyway . . . I drained the tank and put in what I had been using before that, "Mid Grade" marked gas. Bingo! Two days later the knob was back to feeling normal and actually a little better because it seemed so easy to rotate before, that I half expected it to start leaking one day soon.

So if there is indeed no ethanol in this company's fuel, then there's something about this HyTest fuel (or any Premium fuel maybe) that swelled up the stem seal.

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markct

04-17-2018 06:53:13




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Tall T, 04-16-2018 23:35:46  
You do know that only two grades of fuel are delivered to the gas station, mid is a blend of the two



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Caryc

04-16-2018 22:20:44




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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I takes a few seconds to turn that little valve off. How much time, effort and money does it take to have to drain the crank case and add all new oil?
You've seen people here say it actually happened to them. So you know it can happen. Isn't it worth the simple effort to turn it off?



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Eman85

04-16-2018 21:38:00




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Every motorcycle has an automatic fuel shutoff to stop the gravity feed from pushing past the needle, years ago we always shut the fuel manually. Even my Chinese scooter has a vacum actuated fuel shutoff so it doesn't flood the motor. I'm sure one could be adapted to an N.



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TN 2N

04-16-2018 20:24:14




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Definitely not a myth. It happened to my '46 2N last week. Luckily only had about 1 gallon in the tank but it's in the crankcase now!



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JCinKY

04-16-2018 20:07:35




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I’ll add another vote for turning it OFF.

If I leave it one even just overnight it’s a bit** to start the next day. It doesn’t dilute my crankcase. It makes loooots of black smoke(pretty cool if you like that sorta thing), but doesn’t work when I NEED it.

Yeah, yeah fix what’s broke, I’d be fixing Chinese junk non-viton tipped needles till the cows come home.

Either plumb it straight from the tank or use that knob the way it was intended. It takes sooo much effort to crank on it for all of 15 seconds.

If you choose to not to use it, either you’re exceedingly lucky or lazy. My vote goes to the latter.

Funny how people people nit pick over ring end gap, but won’t expend such little effort over a little knob.

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JMOR

04-16-2018 20:02:16




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to seeNo excusing necessary.........I was pointing out that UD was likely doing his usual 'stirring the pot'!



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Ultradog MN

04-17-2018 03:45:21




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to JMOR, 04-16-2018 20:02:16  
Speaking of pots...

If I had set out to stir the pot I might have suggested they convert to 12V and add an in-line electric shut off valve. I might also have suggested they dispense with their old gravity job and buy a newer tractor that has a fuel pump - or maybe, is a diesel. Remind them they'd get more sleep, more gears and maybe power steering.
My point was not whether to turn your fuel off but the grave warnings and dire worst case scenarios that were brought up if you don't.
On the other hand, we all know your penchant for calling the kettle black.

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HFJ

04-16-2018 19:53:53




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
i feel the need to pay homage to my favorite film.

George: All I said was that our son, the apple of our three eyes - Martha being a cyclops - our son is a beanbag, and you get testy!

Nick: I'm tired, I've been drinking since nine o'clock, my wife is vomiting, there's been a lot of screaming going on around here!

George: So you get testy, naturally, don't worry about it! Anybody who comes here ends up getting testy, it's expected. Don't be upset.

Nick: I'm not upset.

George: You're testy.

Nick: Yes.

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Caryc

04-16-2018 19:26:13




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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Well, excuse me. This is an "N" forum so I kind of figured he had an "N". I've never seen a "N" with a fuel pump...a stock "N" that is.



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allenlane

04-16-2018 17:44:07




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I've had it happen on my seasonal Cyclone leaf Rake 10 hp briggs that I stored dry and ran all fuel out of carb. When I filled up the fuel tank to start it after 6 months, the seat didn't seat, and I noticed the recoil starter would not pull (remember liquids do not compress). Confounded until I noticed gas running out of the muffler ! Good way to bend a rod and lot's of other bad things. I follow Dean's method. Turn off fuel, and let it run for a minute to take some of the hydrostatic head off the carb before turning off.

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L.Fure

04-16-2018 17:31:24




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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I've realized that about this group of tractor enthusiast. They think the engine will fall apart if the gas they use is over a couple of weeks old. I've had tractors that sat outside with a half tank of gas for a year or two. The gas would smell so skunky the dogs wouldn't even go near it. Put jumper cables on the battery and fire it right up. Then use the tractor until it's low on fuel and never have a bit of trouble with it.

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JMOR

04-16-2018 17:01:31




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to seehey, Caryc, I do believe UD's tractor has a fuel pump. :)



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Caryc

04-16-2018 16:34:48




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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Besides, even though you check your oil every time, if it happens to you, you still have that mess to clean up.



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Caryc

04-16-2018 16:33:00




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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Of course that begs the question...do you turn yours off?
I've gone 73 years without getting killed in an auto accident but I still use my seat every time.



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Ultradog MN

04-16-2018 16:59:03




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Caryc, 04-16-2018 16:33:00  
Caryc, No, I don't turn mine off. Never have.
I don't mind if you do and I won't tell people not to shut them off. If it makes you feel better, do it.
But...
The urgency of some of the replies to this thread just makes me wonder about people.



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duey

04-16-2018 22:07:35




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Ultradog MN, 04-16-2018 16:59:03  
Dad never did turn the thing off and neither did I for al the years we owned/used it... To each his own...



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Ultradog MN

04-16-2018 15:54:14




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Sheesh.
A lot of worry warts here.
Of the million Ns over the last 70 years I suppose this flooding has occurred 100,000 times.
On any given day you'd probably stand a better chance of winning the powerball than have this happen to you.
Besides, doesn't anyone check their oil and gas before they fire up their tractor?



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fastflyer

04-16-2018 15:42:20




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I have a 1946 Cessna 140 airplane. It has two gravity fed fuel tanks, one in each wing. I always turn the fuel valve off when I'm done flying. If I don't shut the fuel off I'm depending on the carb float valve to hold back 25 gallons of fuel from dumping out on my hanger floor. Major fire risk to my hanger and all the others connected to mine. Same with my 8n, the fuel is always shut off when she's not in use. It's so easy to prevent a major disaster.

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Frontline1

04-16-2018 15:38:55




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I've done it several times on my '49 - luckily, I checked the oil before I went to start it - both times, oily gas ran out the dipstick tube.....

Honestly didn't know there was even a bowl vent on these things - Marvel Schebler carb on mine, not a Zenith, did they both have 'em? Will have to clean it out, though.

Usually burn it dry, now, with "new" gas - sick of taking the carb apart and cleaning it every time I go to use it.

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Caryc

04-16-2018 14:15:45




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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Well...tomorrow could be the day, couldn't it? I guess you're going to count on your lucky streak continuing, right?



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Jimmyjack

04-16-2018 13:39:16




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Guess Ive been lucky. I have never shut a gas valve in over 50 years, and many tractors. Probably should, but thats my story. Never had a problem either.



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Caryc

04-16-2018 12:31:03




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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That's why it's best to not get off the tractor until the engine quits if you do that.



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duey

04-16-2018 11:41:48




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
What wasn't mentioned by all the "valve off, run until it dies" folks is when they forget to turn the key OFF... if they're most fortunate, the engine stops with the points Open... if the points are NOT open, they'll be the 'first to know' when they intend to use the tractor next time...



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cowdog

04-16-2018 11:30:59




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
If the gas is up here and the motor is down here .. That chicken sh^%$t little needle valve is all that stands between you and an empty tank or a ruined tractor engine. Or worse, a fire that burns something down.



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Richard G.

04-16-2018 11:19:18




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I always turn the fuel off on my tractors, 42 JD H, 52 8N, 51 Case VAC.
Richard in NW SC



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L.Fure

04-16-2018 11:12:22




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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I've used and worked on many brands and types of engines in my lifetime. I did have a John Deere model B that filled one cylinder full of gas over night. I had to open the compression relief petcock located under the engine block to drain out the gas. Being young and impatient I mash down on the starter button to help push the gas out. Only I for got to turn off the ignition switch before doing that. That's when I learned about snow not being an effective fire extinguisher. I did get the fire put out, but had to go back to the house to make an adjustment to my underdrawers.
The way I look at an issue with leaky anything is to fix it before something bad can happen. Making sure the sintered-bass drain hole isn't plugged is another thing that should be kept clear. That and a can of Seafoam in the gas tank once in a while helps prevent needle valves from sticking. Relying on shutting off the fuel every time you are done using the tractor has one fault, and that is your memory. I'm sure a lot of us have forgotten important details once in a while in the course of our days. Forgetting to turn off a fuel valve is one of them. Letting another person use our tractors is another. You may tell them about shutting off the gas, but they may forget about it too. So shut off the valve if you feel you must do it, but try adding a few things to your yearly maintenance to help prevent your carburetors from overflowing and making a mess.

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Steve-N-tN

04-16-2018 11:03:31




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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Welding Man is so right!! My John Deere G was hauled here from Nebraska and left there with a full fuel tank. When it got here the tank was dry. Turned out I had 17 gallons of mogas plus 11 quarts of oil in the crankcase. Thank goodness I didn't try to start it!!! Agreed, the engine is different than an 8N, but it can happen and will--

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JMOR

04-16-2018 10:39:27




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to seeWord transposition? Read what is intended, not what you see! :)



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Ed S. (IL)

04-16-2018 10:28:02




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
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One more: I’ve not had this happen on my ‘50 8N, as I always turn the fuel off when done. But I did have it happen some years ago on my ‘71 VW van, which had no shutoff. Thankfully, no smokers dropped a butt near the vehicle, as there was a large puddle running out from underneath. Stuck float valve was the culprit.

es



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Roy Warren

04-16-2018 09:31:55




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Lots of good information. Im convinced that I should cut off the fuel when I shut down. I particularly liked Deans method to shut fuel off and let it empty out before switching it off This would help in remembering to cut it off. I can remember one night I had to get up out of bed and shut it because I forgot. 81 years old and in the forgetful years :)



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Caryc

04-16-2018 08:12:31




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
On most anything you use with an engine that has a gravity fed fuel system on it, there will be a fuel shut off valve. Why do you think that is?



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JMOR

04-16-2018 07:56:35




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to seeJust because one person has not seen an event is not proof that such event can not happen. Picture shows how it happens. Once intake manifold is full, gas passes valves, piston rings and on into crankcase. Yes it does mean that the carb base sintered-bass drain hole is plugged and yes that is a common situation.

I personally have yet another reason for turning off the supply and not doing so has caused me this problem many times in tractors and small engines such as ATVs. It sits for weeks with the float holding in a closed position. Needle sticks, starts & run a few seconds until bowl runs dry (carb work or hammer now in order). Whereas, when I turn off supply valve, run until carb bowl dry, the float has dropped/needle off its seat (where it can not stick to seat) and next time I turn on the supply valve all functions normally without any problem for me to solve. I like it and it works for me!

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Indiana Ken

04-16-2018 07:13:50




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Perhaps it helps to consider the difference in fuel systems used in tractors, motorcycles versus cars of the carburetor era.

- The N series tractors (and many others) use a gravity flow fuel system. In this system the fuel tank is located above the carburetor and fuel flows to the carburetor without the need for a fuel pump. If for any reason the float needle valve does not seal completely the entire contents of the fuel tank can be emptied. The N series carburetor has a vent to accommodate this leakage. If the vent works as intended the fuel leaks onto the ground rather than filling the engine cylinders/crankcase with fuel. However, you still have a mess and/or a fire hazard.

- Cars and trucks typically use a fuel tank mounted below the below the carburetor. This system requires the use of a fuel pump to push fuel to the carburetor. If for any reason the float needle valve does not seal completely the fuel remains in the fuel tank, since there is no pump operation to push it to the carburetor. No fuel leakage results as the vehicle sits.

- Motorcycles of this era also used a gravity flow fuel system with the fuel tank above the carburetor. The carburetors typically had an over flow pipe within the float bowl. In the event the fuel level increased above the open end of the pipe the fuel would be routed through an over flow hose to the ground. If all worked as intended the over flow fuel would not fill the engine cylinders/crankcase. However, you still have a mess and/or a fire hazard. Most manuals for motorcycles do contain a note, stating the fuel petcock must be shut off when the motorcycle is not in use.

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L.Fure

04-16-2018 06:52:36




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
In all my years working around, and repairing, tractor engines have I ever experienced, or heard of, an engine filling up with gas due to a leaky needle valve. The only tractor engine I can think of that this would be possible is any two cylinder John Deere engine. If you feel it's a good idea to shut off the fuel valve when you are done using it, have at it. It certainly won't hurt anything.



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soundguy

04-16-2018 09:02:10




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to L.Fure, 04-16-2018 06:52:36  
Did it on a ih cub in my barn, and on a brigs powered mower, in my garage.

If you haven't seen it, you simply haven't worked on enough old junk for long enough.



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Bruce (VA)

04-16-2018 07:22:12




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to L.Fure, 04-16-2018 06:52:36  
" In all my years working around, and repairing, tractor engines have I ever experienced, or heard of, an engine filling up with gas due to a leaky needle valve. "

Well, now you have heard of it from multiple sources.



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welding man

04-16-2018 06:52:36




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
One thing that the others have not mentioned is to be sure and always turn the gas off when hauling a tractor. The trailer bouncing will bounce the float in he carb and definitely cause it to flood.I have seen it happen many times.



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tractorguy2

04-16-2018 06:46:36




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I shut the gas off on all my tractors and riding mowers. I've had more trouble with the mowers leaking gas into the crankcase than my tractors.



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Roy Warren

04-16-2018 06:44:29




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Thanks for all the replies Ive always done it religiously, but Ive always wondered why. Ill keep own doing it.



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flembo

04-16-2018 06:43:31




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I have a pretty good habit of turning it off, turning it back on is a different story, I can't count the times I get about 50' and it dies.



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Bob

04-16-2018 06:23:41




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

Roy, it's not a matter of whether it's POSSIBLE for the carb inlet valve to fail to seat and run your gasoline out on the ground and possibly into the engine, as well. (Even though you haven't wrapped your mind around how the gasoline can find it's way to the crankcase, rest assured it CAN and WILL.)

It's a matter of WHEN that will happen. If you keep the tractor around long enough, sooner or later it WILL happen.

Closing the fuel tank valve is simply like insurance, you hope you never need it, but sooner or later you WILL.

And if the tractor happens to be in an enclosed area with a possible ignition source, the precaution of shutting of the fuel during periods of non-use could very well prevent a fire or explosion.

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HCooke

04-16-2018 06:22:45




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Happened to me on a '45 2N. Resulted in a hydrolock and and contaminated gas in the crankcase.



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Bruce (VA)

04-16-2018 06:07:22




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
No, it's not a myth.

See tip # 9.

" I find nothing in the manuals to support this."

Nor will you find anything in the manuals telling you not to have an open flame around the gas tank. Sometimes common sense prevails. Henry had a fuel cut-off on his 4.8 million Model A Fords from 1928 to 1931. He didn't need to tell tractor owners to cut the gas off; it was common sense.

This is one of the things that can happen if oil gets in the gas:

" We just had an 8N in the shop that the owner wanted us to fix the carb leak and replace the starter because the engine wouldn"t turn over. Turns out the base had more gas in it than oil and the bearings didn"t get enough lube from the diluted oil and seized the engine. I think of that tractor every time I park my tractors now and don"t forget to shut the fuel off."

(YT Post 10/10/07)

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Den N Ms

04-16-2018 10:31:52




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Bruce (VA), 04-16-2018 06:07:22  
This is one of the things that can happen if oil gets in the gas: ?

Hows that,I would like to know how that happens?



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Dean

04-16-2018 05:40:47




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
I always turn off the fuel valve and allow the engine to consume the gasoline in the carburetor before turning off the ignition on gravity flow fuel systems.

Yes, a properly working float/needle valve/seat system will prevent fuel from overflowing the float bowl, but such systems are known to fail for various reasons. If the fuel flow control system in the carburetor fails, fuel will overflow the float bowl and either run out onto the ground or fill the intake manifold and run into the engine.

Why take such chance?

Dean

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wgm

04-16-2018 06:22:39




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Dean, 04-16-2018 05:40:47  
I do the same thing. It should always be done especially with downflow carburetors.



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L.Fure

04-16-2018 05:37:50




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to Roy Warren, 04-16-2018 05:26:17  
Quoting Removed, click Modern View to see

It's not true. If it was a lot of engines would have been ruined by now. The only reason I ever shut the fuel off is to clean out sediment bowl, or if I have a known leak and don't want to lose any gasoline while the tractor is sitting unused.



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Bruce (VA)

04-16-2018 06:10:16




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 Re: Is gas cutoff story la myth? in reply to L.Fure, 04-16-2018 05:37:50  
It's not a myth. What will happen if the needle valve sticks open?

" If it was a lot of engines would have been ruined by now. "

Well, some were.

Why take the chance?

This is one of the things that can happen if oil gets in the gas:

" We just had an 8N in the shop that the owner wanted us to fix the carb leak and replace the starter because the engine wouldn"t turn over. Turns out the base had more gas in it than oil and the bearings didn"t get enough lube from the diluted oil and seized the engine. I think of that tractor every time I park my tractors now and don"t forget to shut the fuel off."

(YT Post 10/10/07)

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