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John Deere Tractors Discussion Forum
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Re: 52 B, starting restoration

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JRSutton

10-01-2013 05:07:22
108.49.237.127



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I don't know - I'd say anything sitting THAT long untouched is a special case that's probably not wise to do the soak and force method.

A lot depends on how it was stored of course - stored indoors in a dry climate is obviously a different case than outside in a wet climate.

But assuming somewhere in the middle - a lot can happen over thirty years. The cylinders can be so badly pitted they need to be bored anyways which means there's no sense continuing on this path.

Valves can be stuck solid so even if you get the pistons free you'll be bending pushrods, etc etc.

I think I'd start by pulling the breather tube cover and looking in to the bottom of the cylinders - then pull the head and see what you've got in there.

Head gaskets aint cheap for that engine - but I don't think you're going to be able to avoid ripping the engine apart to at least inspect everything.

It's inevitable - pull the head.

If you find things don't really look that bad -you can still keep applying penetrating oil to the pistons. And keep rocking the tractor by the back wheels.

That's how we freed ours up - put it in gear and just keep rocking back and forth. It seemed totally hopeless, but then we saw the flywheel jump a little. Then a little more... then finally free.

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MessingK

10-01-2013 06:47:02
70.194.5.2



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 Re: 52 B, starting restoration in reply to JRSutton, 10-01-2013 05:07:22  
Mike and JR:

My dad said when the tractor quit running, my grandpa left it outside for a year before he pulled it in the shed. The engine was still free at that point. There it sat in a steel, uninsulated pole building out of the Michigan elements.

A little more info on what I've done and my observations. I drained the oil to flush the crankcase, there was a little water, but nowhere near what I would have expected. I removed the valve cover and everything looked clean, valves all moved, though one stuck a little at first. Pushrods also seemed good and were not sticking.

I removed the cover to the crankcase. Piston on clutch side is near top dead center, a few small spots of surface rust on the cylinder wall. My thought is this one is stuck. Flywheel side piston is near bottom of cylinder, I can see where my penetrating fluid has leaked through and ran into the crankcase, leads me to believe a ring job is certain.

There is a little wiggle in the flywheel, but not much. Just enough to see the bearings on the crank are not stuck. Overall, I'm impressed and surprised with the condition of things considering how long it has sat.

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mike m

10-01-2013 19:33:07
184.20.169.244



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 Re: 52 B, starting restoration in reply to MessingK, 10-01-2013 06:47:02  
You can only gain at this point because if you get it freed up and running you can check it out before ripping it apart. I have had great sucess if they still have the cast iron pistons in them. Get the valves lubed up and free. Last one I did was worse then yours. Fill the cylinders up with diesel or kerosene I used this because it was cheaper then special penetrants. With plugs in fill up intake and exhaust I pull the carb. AND EX pipe pull mag. as these will all need reworked anyhow. Let sit. If you see it seeping out the back of the pistons you are gaining and it should go. Leave rocker arms and push rods off at first. When ready to try and turn remove spark plugs. If I can chain a spud bar to the flywheel to where I can stand on it I do and then bounce up and down on it. Last one bar was not in good spot so I chained a comealong to the fylwheel up top or past wraped the cable over and down and hooked the other end to the drawbar frame. Worked the ratchet end underneath and in no short order it budged. This actualy lined up for a really nice pulling action. Keep everything lubed up as you go and work it both directions gaining more each time. Once you can go all the way around then it is time to flush it out. Just dont get too carried away and NEVER tow one around in gear until to get it turning by hand.

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JRSutton

10-01-2013 11:38:24
108.49.237.127



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 Re: 52 B, starting restoration in reply to MessingK, 10-01-2013 06:47:02  
condensation can still cause a lot of rust - but it's conceivable that you can break it free.

fill the cylinders till it leaks out the spark plug holes. Then stick an air hose in and blast the fluid so it bubbles and splashes all over everything inside there.

Do that often -

the penetrating oil will do its work, the parts don't necessarily have to bathe in it. As long as you constantly wet them like that.

Put it in the highest gear and keep rocking it back and forth, kind of hard.

Keep an eye on the flywheel. When you lose faith and feel it's never going to move, you might just see a little jump. That'll keep you going till it fully pops free.

for something untouched for that long, I'd definitely avoid pulling with another tractor, or something more extreme. Better to operate first.

Good luck - keep us updated.

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