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Implement Alley Discussion Forum

broadcasting fertilizer

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Snuf

05-01-2005 07:45:01
216.18.131.114



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I am thinking of replacing my well worn pull behind dry fertilizer spreader with a pto drivin broadcaster. However I am not sure how to judge the spacing for each round so as to not skip some places or get an overlap. With my ol pull behind it was not a problem because you had the tire marks to tell you where the next round should be. How the heck do you it? Thanks Snuffy




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kyhayman

05-01-2005 17:23:05
205.188.117.14



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Snuf, 05-01-2005 07:45:01  
Chart on the spreador will tell you the coverage width. I get 'luck of the draw' at the co-op, most of the ones I get are 40' the pass. They do have a couple of 30's and a couple of 50's. It pays to check the machine you get. I just estimate, sometimes getting a little 'pasture mosaic'. For crops that demand a lot more accuracy, I get the co-op to spread (probably should all the time), cost is modest and time is $$$ (they charge $35 a load, up to 8 tons) and $2.50 an acre with GPS guidance.

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paul

05-01-2005 09:06:15
209.23.145.33



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Snuf, 05-01-2005 07:45:01  
Depends how much you do. Several 100 acres, & you get pretty good at judging it. Step it off a few times, & drive straight tot he other end - pick an object on the horizon.

Using a 1/2 rate & spreading double coming back on the seam as mentioned is the best way to spread fert; takes 2x as long.

--->Paul



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Kelly C

05-01-2005 08:36:24
63.171.43.140



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Snuf, 05-01-2005 07:45:01  
Heres what I did. I took 2 6 foot poles with white buckets on them. Spreader had a 50 foot spread.
AT the south end where I started 25 feet in. I placed the pole/ bucket= Target. 50 feet east.
I walked to the north end and placed my target 25 feet in from the edge. I then drove to the 1st target. When I got there I spun around and lined up with the south target. I then moved the other target 75 feet to the east giveng me my target on the way back. AT each end of the field I just moved the target for the return trip. Seemed to work ok. Spreader ran out at the end of my field just right.

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Sid

05-01-2005 08:04:20
12.156.150.183



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Snuf, 05-01-2005 07:45:01  
In a couple of my fields I have stepped of and marked post at each end of the field. Other wise I set the spredder for one half of what I want to put on and I will drive so that I can see the fertilizer hitting my tracks from previous pass (double spreading is what we call it around here.) Sometimes when the tracks are hard to see I turn around and get lined outand pick a mark at far end of field and drive to it. Usually come out pretty close to getting what I wanted on the field. Around here we get free use of a spreader from dealer. Disclaimer: I do not guarentee global positioning accuracey.

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lee blount

05-01-2005 13:32:52
151.213.221.139



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Sid, 05-01-2005 08:04:20  
All fertilizer spreaders are set up to spread back to the center of your last thru, that's not "double spreading" that is exactly what the charts on fertilizer spreaders are set for.

Space yourself where the fertilizer is barely hitting your last set of tracks and if you know the density of the product and set the gate accordingly, you should come real close to what the chart says.



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thurlow

05-01-2005 14:00:31
65.255.98.11



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to lee blount, 05-01-2005 13:32:52  
No Sir: not where I live and the spreaders used around "here" (Tote, Willmar, etc). The pull-behind typically cover 40-45 ft.......single pass. Most of us use single-pass for fertlizing where the coverage isn't critical, pasture, wheat, etc. For cotton, corn and other high-dollar crops, where missed coverage can result in big yield losses, we double-spread. Local C0-0P has at times set up pans.....in-a-row in their parking lot......and pulled a spreader across them to check coverage. 40 ft spreader covers 40 ft, with maybe a TINY bit of lap.

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lee blount

05-01-2005 16:49:20
151.213.221.47



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to thurlow, 05-01-2005 14:00:31  
Well sir, I spread fertilizer for a living, so I guess you're right and I don't know what I'm talking about. But then I've only spread with Lorals, Terragators, Titans, Caseih Titans, DFI, Adams and a few others. So please inform us.



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Markus

05-01-2005 17:41:19
152.163.100.7



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to lee blount, 05-01-2005 16:49:20  
I'd like you to spread my fertilizer....by the acre...I would get extra from the overlap :)



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lee blount

05-01-2005 19:01:20
151.213.221.154



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Markus, 05-01-2005 17:41:19  
Listen I'm not trying to be a smartass here, but I'm telling you that dry box spinner type fertilizer spreaders are designed to be run so that you overlap by half on each thru {i.e. throw back to the center of the last pass}. If you don't believe me, go ask somebody actually in the business.



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paul

05-01-2005 21:12:15
209.23.145.59



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to lee blount, 05-01-2005 19:01:20  
My coop uses Wilmar buggies, every time i got one they set it up for 40' spread, one pass. I could request a double-back setup, but their 'standard' mode of operation is to work with a full spread of 40'.

Whatever is best, that is how it is done 'here' from the pros in southern Minnesota.

--->Paul



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lee blount

05-02-2005 03:12:26
151.213.221.192



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to paul, 05-01-2005 21:12:15  
Next time you spread with it, measure off exactly how far its slinging. Unless you're spreading just ammonia nitrate or sulfate, I promise you it's spreading farther than 40'. And if it will only spread 40' and you run exactly 40', then unless you're using completely homogenous fertilizer, you're doing a poor job. Simply because with blended fertilizer the denser products such as murate and k-mag will go much farther than nitrate, sulfate, or DAP. And if you're only using homogenous ammoniated fertilizer, at todays prices, you're really getting the screws put to you.

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paul

05-02-2005 07:01:15
66.60.197.229



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to lee blount, 05-02-2005 03:12:26  
I understand the issues you are bringing up: Common practice 'here' is to use a 40' setup on these buggies (some are 50'...) and do a single trip for 250 lbs of maintenence fert in fall. We all use starter up here in the north, and we all use tillage as it's too cold & wet for notill so things get moved around a bit. Guess my point is, you don't hardly ever see anyone doing the double-back overlap, as that wastes too much time.

My point, as you seemed to say that doesn't ever happen anywhere in a rather gruff manor.

It does happen here.

--->Paul

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Trump

05-01-2005 18:35:11
71.0.116.120



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Markus, 05-01-2005 17:41:19  
You will have to calibrate your're spreader. Charts are available from your extension agent. Just keep in mind that the farther the sling the less it will deliver. In other words if you are slinging 200 lbs. behind the spreader when you go to the outside of the sling it will only be about 150 lbs. or so (this is only an example). That is why you need to do over lap. The gravity flow spreaders are more accurate but takes more time. If you are throwing fertilizer on lawn or pasture you will see a difference in a few days if you get rain or irrigate. Light green or yellow strips will tell you that throw swath was to wide. Just try to keep an accurate pattern the first time around. Don't over fertilize,this will cause acidity problems ,nitrogen will raise the soil ph. Its really easy,you also need to do soil testing to find out the nutrients your land needs.

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Trump

05-01-2005 18:31:11
71.0.116.120



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 Re: broadcasting fertilizer in reply to Markus, 05-01-2005 17:41:19  
You will have to calibrate your're spreader. Charts are available from your extension agent. Just keep in mind that the farther the sling the less it will deliver. In other words if you are slinging 200 lbs. behind the spreader when you go to the outside of the sling it will only be about 150 lbs. or so (this is only an example). That is why you need to do over lap. The gravity flow spreaders are more accurate but takes more time. If you are throwing fertilizer on lawn or pasture you will see a difference in a few days if you get rain or irrigate. Light green or yellow strips will tell you that throw swath was to wide. Just try to keep an accurate pattern the first time around. Don't over fertilize,this will cause acidity problems ,nitrogen will raise the soil ph. Its really easy,you also need to do soil testing to find out the nutrients your land needs.

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