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Farmall & IHC Tractors Discussion Forum
Show Parts for Model:

Why detassel corn?? Please tell me

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newtoit

07-31-2005 15:22:03
67.2.202.4



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Only thing worse than not having to ask is not knowing and never asking. Am I supposed to be detasseling my sweetcorn for any reason. I know the brothers did it in huge feilds when we were yopuger they never asked why just whats the pay. If I am why and when should it be done.




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Dry Pond

08-03-2005 15:21:41
68.162.84.74



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
Some people detassel sweet corn after it has pollinated to decrease insect pressure and to help prevent it from blowing down. I have no idea if it prevents insects or if it is just a communist conspiracy.



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mikeinWA

07-31-2005 23:05:58
207.118.9.102



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
They detassel sweet corn in the Valley here to prevent it from blowing over and nothing more.



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DAR

07-31-2005 22:17:43
4.159.208.221



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
I have done it for the past 6 years and still going. i am a crew leader and i am in charge of 45 kids and tell them what to do and how much to pay them. the reason for sweet corn is the same for seed corn if you are making a hybrid sweet corn seed to be planted next year. if you are going to consume the sweet corn then i suggest that you leave the tassels on so the corn can pollenate.



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riverbend

07-31-2005 20:00:24
208.160.33.11



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
Short answer - don't detassel your sweet corn.



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Farmallkid From Ont,

07-31-2005 18:31:39
209.216.154.153



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
I did that for 2 years. Don"t know why sweet corn has to be done, i know seed corn has to. The pollen from the male plant falls onto the silk of the female to make seed corn, if you don"t detassel the female, then you would get inbred corn



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Professor Von Brauner

07-31-2005 17:31:41
131.107.0.89



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
The early Puritans began this practice in response to the perception that corn was brazenly carrying on in a flagrant manner like the strumpets of old. The practice of castrating cattle, horses and other farm animals was extended to the plant kingdom on the basis of deeply rooted concerns that the corn might be enjoying wantonly pollinating other ears of corn in a capricious or disrespectful manner wherever the winds might choose to blow, in much the same way that wild oats had been steadily gaining a reputation towards.

In central New England as well as more isolated but none-the-less equally devoted areas, detasslers grew in both numbers as well as political influence. On the local level detasseling committees were set up, officials appointed and gangs of detasselers would roam the countryside prior to harvestime and would trim the errant yet robust ears of corn in order to enforce their strict moral code. These same crews would often be the same ones who would come along ina few weeks time to harvest the same ears or help with the threshing on other fields.

Trouble ensued when some of the more orthodox detasselers ventured into fields not their own and began to detassel ears of corn over the protests of dissenting farmers. Disputes broke out threats of violence were sometimes followed up by mysterious fires that would be set at night in the fields of those more progressively minded with regards to the detasseling issue.

At the same time powerful Puritan political coalitions were formed and laws passed in some districts where it was deemed more expedient to legislate the practice in under the auspices of the law rather than engaging in the somewhat risky practice of detasseling the corn of those who resisted such measures. The power of the detasseling movement reached its zenith during the 1730's with the passage of the "Retraction of Tassels Act" with levied a heavy surcharge on corn that had not been detasseled. Spreading from Massachusetts this Act grew to encompass Maryland, Delaware and large tracts of Pennsylvania most of New York and scattered sections of the Ohio Valley.

The detasseling movement was broadly supported by the English monarchy and became closely associated with allegiance to the homeland. With the growing friction between those more freely minded farmers who steadfastly refused to detassel their corn and those just as determined that it should be so, conflict was imminent. With the eventual victory of those colonists with a more independent vision both as to how to govern themselves as well as how to most properly grow corn the detasseling movement gradually fell into disfavor and out of standard practice where it had once reigned supreme. Where other crops where not as commonly raised as corn and their corrupting influence not as quickly felt however, scattered areas of detasseling hung on with surprising vigor well into the 20'th century with some actual areas of growth in the practice spreading through the central areas of the country not, as historically connected to the actual war with England at the time of the peak of the detasseling movement.

While the practice is largely ignored today one still finds the odd remnant averring the benefits of detasseling corn, promising all sorts of extravagant claims of increased yields, purer genetic stock or an avowed source of virgin corn. The practice is all but winked at today and is a favorite "inside" joke which old farmers like to try and test the knowledge of their city cousins or spring a practical joke on the neighbors who seem to have too much time on their hands.

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burn n 1

08-01-2005 19:55:47
216.248.117.172



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to Professor Von Brauner, 07-31-2005 17:31:41  
in response to professor vanbrauner...dude what are you smokin....awsum!



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Brent in IA

07-31-2005 17:51:40
199.120.87.137



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to Professor Von Brauner, 07-31-2005 17:31:41  
Now that was good! :-) I wish I could BS like that...



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Dick Davis

08-01-2005 02:40:02
205.188.117.73



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to Brent in IA, 07-31-2005 17:51:40  
Wish I could say it as well!! LOL



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JMS/MN

07-31-2005 16:32:35
204.73.106.15



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
Hybrid corn has two parents. It is a cross between the two. In seed fields, the two parents are planted, and one is detassled, so the other can fertilize the one which is detassled. You might see 4-6 rows detassled, next to 2 that are left. The fertilized rows yield very little- 20-50 bpa, but that is the hybrid seed that we plant the next year, which yields much more. Perfect example of hybrid vigor.

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amos

07-31-2005 16:25:46
64.81.231.196



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
the pollon from the tassel falls on to the silk of the ear and that is how the kernell is formed, in a normal field of corn the pollon just blows around and pollenates all the silk but in a field that is grown for seed corn they want to be albe to control what pollen goes to what silk so they detassel the ones that they dont want to pollenate the others, they try to develop certain qualites in the seed corn ,those filds are usually isolated from normal corn fields. I hope this helps more then it confuses

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Honest Jon

07-31-2005 16:21:02
131.107.0.89



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
Corn is still detassled in some of the more backward areas of the country. It is a holdout from the days when tassled corn was seen as a gaudy extravagence.



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BOYD G

07-31-2005 16:13:07
208.186.57.65



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to newtoit, 07-31-2005 15:22:03  
Corn is detaseled when the corn is grown for seed. I realy dont know why but it is. Hope this helps. Boyd



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CNKS

07-31-2005 16:27:57
204.249.178.138



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to BOYD G, 07-31-2005 16:13:07  
Corn is a hybrid -- an over-simplification is that the seed companies cross separate male and female lines, they don't want it pollinating itself.



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KAK

07-31-2005 17:26:06
63.26.1.157



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 Re: Why detassel corn?? Please tell me in reply to CNKS, 07-31-2005 16:27:57  
If you detassel your sweet corn you will get no kernels on the cob. You need the tassel to pollinate the kernels on the cob. That is the reason they say to plant at least 4 rows of sweet corn - to get good pollination! One year I planted Indian corn next to my sweet corn. What a mess the sweet corn was. Especially the corn in the rows next to the Indian corn. Good Luck.
Ken



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