Yesterday's Tractor Co. Shop Now
   Allis Chalmers Case Farmall IH Ford 8N,9N,2N Ford
   Ferguson John Deere Massey Ferguson Minn. Moline Oliver
 
Marketplace
Classified Ads
Photo Ads
Tractor Parts

Community
Discussion Forums
Project Journals
Tractor Town
Your Stories
Show & Pull Guide
Events Calendar
Hauling Schedule

Galleries
Tractor Photos
Implement Photos
Vintage Photos
Help Identify
Parts & Pieces
Stuck & Troubled
Vintage Ads
Community Album
Photo Ad Archives

Research & Info
Articles
Tractor Registry
Tip of the Day
Safety Cartoons
Tractor Values
Serial Numbers
Tune-Up Guide
Paint Codes
List Prices
Production Nbrs
Tune-Up Specs
Torque Values
3-Point Specs
Glossary

Miscellaneous
Tractor Games
Just For Kids
Virtual Show
Museum Guide
Memorial Page
Feedback Form

Yesterday's Tractors Facebook Page

Related Sites
Tractor Shed
TractorLinks.com
Ford 8N/9N Club
Today's Tractors
Garden Tractors
Classic Trucks
Kountry Life

  
Project Journal - D10 Restoration
Handle: YTSupport  
Project Name: D10 Restoration  
Tractor: AC D10  
Started: 05:52 11/22/17  
Updated: 21:20 06/19/18  
Expand/Contract all Journal Entries   Show newest journal entry on top

06:48 11/22/17


06:48 11/22/17

 06:48 11/22/17  Initial Problems
Kim bought a D10 and I bought a D12 respectively, to restore. This was not something to undertake immediately, because the first priority was finishing the rebuild of the Yesterday's Tractors D14. The D10 is a Series III and at first glance was an excellent specimen of an original machine, no mods at all, no paint jobs in the past etc. She plans to use it for bush hogging in the spring, and we decided we would hold off on the cosmetic and minor mechanical restoration items until the shop was clear. We simultaneously have the Oliver 1950FWA which needs a lot of work. My shop just isn't big enough for all of these machines at once. While the D10 and D12 await their turn, my son's job is to keep them running and exercised. In my experience with the probably 30 tractors I've had, if you purchase a good tractor and let it sit, it will become junk in short order.

In the course of keeping the D10 running, a problem with the electrical developed, a bad ground that would spark and generally keep the tractor from starting at times. We decided to roll it over to the shop and fix as few things as possible, not really start the restoration but just get the electrical connections cleaned up. As you know, it can be extremely difficult to do "just a little" work on a tractor you are excited about restoring. It's not only excitement that causes this, it's also that each little problem, is usually the tip of an iceberg, and very quickly, things can spiral into a larger project than you have time and space to deal with. I tried very hard to avoid this, but there were a few problems that screamed to be fixed right up front.

The electrical problem was a more serious issue that I initially thought. It did have a bad ground cable so that seemed simple enough. But putting on a new one, really didn't help and we got out the fluke and started checking just how good a ground we were getting from the bolts where the D10 is supposed to be grounded (one of the fender mount bolts). On closer examination, I couldn't find a good ground anywhere on the rear of the tractor. This led to disassembling fenders, mounts, operator platform, pulling the battery out, all cables, and seat. When we removed the battery and seat, we found the problem. The corrosion from the battery had seriously damaged all of these components. It was not obvious that this tractor was rusted until we pulled everything off, but the rot was severe. I didn't want to just create good connections with rotted parts, nor did I think it prudent to put expensive cabling in on junk. So all the components mentioned were sandblasted, the worst corrosion treated with soda, then POR-15, primed and painted in Persian number 2. While this was happening, the fenders, which are extremely expensive to replace, lighting, and mounts were removed and left off. Replacing the rotted sections in the panels will be a body work job of patch panel replacement, restoring the light cans and mounts will involve machining and maybe even some casting. I'm limiting the project by not putting those back on but keeping them in the shop where I can work on them when not working on other projects. We also had new tires for this machine, so it seemed a good time to replace those and one of the rims that was badly cracked. The last thing was that the seat mount and pan were far more damaged that we realized initially. The bushings needed replacement in the seat spring assembly, the bolt that holds the shock in place was bent, and the pan needed sand blasting and painting as the inside was seriously rusted.

Fixing the above problems, was how far we decided to take it this time, then once the tractor was back on the road and not clogging the main entrance to the shop, at leisure we'd fix a few other minor issues that can be done prior to the real restoration later this winter. These were a leaky pan gasket, leaky oil filter mount, gauge replacement (and thus a new wiring harness), filling the steering wheel cracks with epoxy, replacing the inappropriate sediment bowl, and rebuilding the carb since it has a leaky float valve. These can all be done as day jobs so the tractor can be brought from the barn and occupy the shop just for the short time required to do them. Since we have multiple machines to deal with, the D14 restore is taking up one bay of the shop, and the rest of the tractors need to share the other when necessary. I'm also batching together projects like the patch panels for the fenders on this one, with the more serious patch panels required for the D15D restoration (other than the fenders, this tractor is not due for a couple of weeks). That way, the TIG work necessary can all be done in one shot after practicing up. I haven't done sheet metal welding for 17 years, plus I always used MIG, and there will be just one shot to do it right on all four of these fenders, they are getting harder to find in good condition.

For this entry, I'm just going to show the before and after of this interim project, and will make other entries for the individual projects to this point. Then after the first of the year, hopefully we'll be ready to start the full cosmetic restoration and I'll include that here too as separate journal entries. Note, the "After" picture is not really after, this was a mock up before I drilled and installed the new battery box or ran the new cabling. The seat is also not mounted on there because while we are working on it, that beautiful white and black seat, will get dirty from our grimy work coveralls. As this stage completed, we have just the old seat cushion back on it. Also note that in this picture, the new battery box is backward, when I drilled it and installed, it's was oriented appropriately for the Series III.


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17


20:18 11/29/17

 20:18 11/29/17  Restoration Begins
The D10 is really not supposed to be restored yet. It on the list, but the list is long. Nonetheless, when one day it wouldn't start and the battery connections just threw out fireworks, we had to do something. In a way, that work is the beginning of the restoration.

We decided to tear down just what was necessary to clean up the ground connections, and as we pulled off parts, plus since it was stuck in the shop while we did that, we tried to get as many small issues out of the way now. We pulled off the hitch so we could remove the fender supports. That meant fenders, tool box, operator platform, and what was left of the battery box. After pulling the battery out, and exposing the rotted 1/8 inch steel around the battery box, not to mention the rotted 16 gauge that once was a battery box, we knew we had more work to do.

At this point we decided to replace the cables with the quality wiring we'd purchased from CE Auto Electric (Yesterday's Tractors only sells wiring for a minimal number of tractors, if you are working on an Allis, the place to buy wiring is CE Auto, they have very seriously high quality wire, and you can get it in lengths that match the job, most high quality wire is only purchasable in spools, and unless you are wiring 10 tractors, it's impractical). This meant pulling the side covers and that meant pulling the steering arm first.

After everything was disassembled, we used a baking soda paste on everything that had been damaged by battery acid. It wouldn't do to prime and paint if we didn't stop the reactions. Before that, everything we pulled off had to be heavily wire brushed at a minimum and in some cases, sand blasted. We made good used of the Skat Blast cabinet since there are not parts on the D10, that won't fit in the cabinet.

When it came time to paint, I decided to try POR-15. It is supposed to stop rust dead in it's tracks and I'm hoping it will do that. The downside is that it dries very slick, but it also had a tendency to ball up in spots. By the time we start the real restoration, I should know how effective it is. Those parts that got the POR-15 treatment and the rest of the parts, received primer and Persian #2. It's a bit frustrating to limit oneself to just a part of the tractor. The contrast between the original and newly painted parts is striking, and to my mind, not a nice contrast. Reassembly of the painted and cleaned parts, involved removing the paint from the specific areas where the ground connections needed to be good.

Meanwhile, since the tractor was laid up, we pulled the rims off, replaced the one that had a crack in it, and after sand-blasting and treating the inside of the rims with POR-15, we painted them up, and put the new tires on. That of course meant cleaning and painting the hubs too, which since I didn't pull them, that will be a future job.

Finally we put it all back together with the new wiring. Since we were using very high quality wire, we put the best loom on it I could find, and ran the wires for the future fender lighting that will go on with the restoration. We also used battery, ground and starter connections that were pressed on rather than the screw on type you get at the auto parts store.

When it was all together, the work was worth it. All the grounding problems were gone and it started and ran like a top. Now we can put it back to bed in the barn until we are ready for it.

A lot of parts stayed off it, so I could work on them in my spare time. The rot had progressed to the fenders and tool box, and those will require patch panels. The light cans were damaged and the rare bolts that hold them on stripped, those had to be cut off. We did managed to clean up years of hydraulic oil and dirt sludge, and the tractor will be quite easy to finalize for painting when it's time comes.

I was happy with this turn of events because now I can keep the D10 in line and the second bay of the shop clear for work on the current project, the D14.

06:45 05/30/18


06:45 05/30/18


06:45 05/30/18


06:45 05/30/18

 06:45 05/30/18  Oil Issues
The first order of business getting back to this, was sealing up the oil leaks. It appeared that the rear seal, oil pan gasket and oil filter base were all leaking. The oil filter base was the worst so I cleaned it up, contained the oil coming out of it, then let it sit for a couple of days and no oil came out of the pan or rear seal. It appears that it's just the oil filter base leaking on everything else. I removed it and the tubes connecting it to the pump and oil pressure gauge. Not only had it been installed with nothing but a black silicone (no cork gasket), but it also was warped badly. All cleaned up, it rocked more than 1/16th of an inch when pressed against the surface of the block. The gasket could not take up this slack. I lapped the surface flat removing probably a 1/16 and now the gasket should be able to take up irregularities. It has another issue which I'm not comfortable with. The tube that goes up into the oil filter, is nearly an inch shorter than all the other ones I have laying around. I don't think that was a factory mod but almost looks like someone cut it off, then redrilled the side holes. I'm going to reinstall this one since one additional problem is, new 3/8s holes were drilled in the block to accept this rather than the normal 5/16s. The oil base was also drilled out to match this, so replacing the tube would make more sense if I do anything with it. Right now, reinstalling and getting this sealed is the first order, so I can see if I also need to do pan gasket or rear seal. Since I have a spare base tube of the right length, I will probably replace this short one, I don't think it's right and will limit the oil filters effectiveness. After seeing how badly the oil filter was installed, it might make sense to do the pan just to be sure. It also has a mess of black silicone and also may not have been put together with a gasket. If I'm unable to see one after close examination, I'll pull the pan and put a real gasket on it.

Update: 06/01/18 The leveling on the oil base worked like a charm. Installed and ran for 10 minutes with new oil, parked it for the night with a clean white butcher paper under it. No drips and not even any seepage around any of the gaskets. Going to call that success. I replaced the short tube, because someone had hacked this base up, I had to jb weld it (just a bit), it was way too sloppy in there. Oil pressure is perfect.

07:37 06/02/18


07:37 06/02/18


07:37 06/02/18


07:37 06/02/18


08:15 06/03/18


08:15 06/03/18


08:15 06/03/18

 07:37 06/02/18  Manifold and Muffler
The muffler had a large hole in it, and it was an underhood. This dumps exhaust and sparks downward and is too dangerous during the late cutting season. We have a oval up pipe on the way so I removed the muffler in prep. The mounting bolt on the manifold snapped as I expected, and the mount that connected to the thermostat housing also had to come off, meaning the thermostat housing did too, because, that bolt snapped off. Then all but one of the housing bolts snapped off since it had to come off to extract the first. These were all virtually expected. The thermostat housing bolts on the D14 all snapped off too, same with the muffler mount. Also one of the exhaust manifold studs snapped (I figured I was ahead since I lost two off one of these heads last time. My biggest fear in this is that the head will have to come off. The aversion is that this is a very tight well running engine, and removing the head would introduce variables and increase the amount of mechanical work necessary. I'll be rewiring, some machine work on the steering gear, and possibly some hydraulics work, but mostly this was supposed to be a cosmetic restoration at least as far as the engine goes. Another interesting thing that could indicate more mechanical work, is that the front cover of the engine was more caked with grime (dirt and oil) that we might find that the front seal leaks now that we've removed all that dirt. It was an inch thick in some spots and could have been hiding leaks.

Anyway, though no surprises, you always hope you can avoid a day or more of painstaking work extracting broken bolts. So far only one of these requires drilling and that will be the most time consuming one. Still can count on spending most of the day getting these out and cleaned up. My son will work the rest of the disassembly, and I expect to be painting some parts before the weekend is out.

Update: 06/03/18: All the broken studs came out. I spent virtually the entire day on them due to being extremely cautious. I did NOT want to pull the head on this tractor. The Thermostat housing broke pulling it off, the warning is that nothing but hand pressure should be used to break it loose from the broken studs. I don't believe you can remove the thermostat housing bolts without snapping a few off. The bolts "weld" themselves to the pot metal (correction: it's aluminum thanks to someone on the forum who pointed that out, I had no idea but that explains why these casings have such a tendency to bind themselves to the capscrews). I pulled the parts D14's housing and cleaned it up to replace the broken one. I broke it by using a pipe in the upper outlet to get leverage. You can't do this period. Glad I had a second housing. Removal of the studs from the housing outlet, required only small vice grips and I snuck up on them with pressure. Removal of the manifold stud was also a finesse operation. I threaded the stud with a 3/8s die, put two nuts on it so they were locked on, then using an open end on one side, and the vice grips clamped close to the head and out the other side (so it was like having a T-handle, I could put even pressure on both sides and not snap the stud off in the head. It still took a lot of pressure to get it out, but I felt confident I was using balanced pressure. The manifold bolt is still broken off, but I'm taking that to my brother's mill so he can us an end mill on it. I have not had good luck drilling out studs like this since the hole must be perfectly centered. Using an end mill and a solidly built mill, means no mistakes.

We also removed the hitch and drained all the fluids from transmission, hydraulic/pto case, and two-speed transmission. Not looking like this weekend will net any paint work, too much to clean first.

Interesting note on the assembly of the thermostat housing. On the D10, D12, D14, and D15 (G-149 version), Allis Chalmers used an odd size bolt on the right rear bolt of the housing. In my experience, it's always a 5/16s shank with a 7/16s head (rather than a 1/2 inch head as a normal 5/16s bolt would have). I doubt I could even buy one, but there must have been some reason and it's always fascinated me.

07:34 06/04/18


08:45 06/06/18


08:45 06/06/18


20:25 06/08/18

 07:34 06/04/18  Governor and more cleanup
Pulled the rest of the front down and removed the D10 Series III front weight, not the external one, but the internal radiator support. With both weights on the front, this machine has more front weight than the D14. Both weights are massive. Was able to clean more effectively as a result but it's a surprisingly slow process. While cleaning, I found the governor has a hole in the front of it. None of the others I've had have this and someone, glued a plug in it sometime in it's history. Folks on the forums say there is no pressure to speak of in the governor/distributor cases, so I'll glue a new plug on. I knocked this one loose cleaning and when the fan hit it during a test starting, it tore it off. The photo shows a normal cover and this cover. I'll cut a small circle of pot metal and JB Weld into the indentation after cleaning the surface of old glue. Should be able to sand/grind it smooth and it will appear to be stock then.

Plan is currently to remove ops foot rests, rams and swinging drawbar. That should be far enough down to get at everything and clean up the rear. On top, steering wheel, steering gear, dash and tank support are coming off and that will provide cleaning and wiring access, plus I want to work on the internals of the steering gear. It has a strange feeling at the middle tooth, and I think it will require a new gear or maybe a trip to the machine shop. I doubt I'll easily find any replacement parts for it. It's a Ross, but far different than the common B/C/CA steering gears. It appears there is also a stripped bolt held captive in the steering gear case by the throttle linkage. Need to check that out too.

6/6/18: Continued cleanup showed me that this is the dirtiest tractor I've every worked on. Most is gone now, but we've removed pounds of greasy dirt, one inch thick in spots. One other first is that the hydraulic console is designed horribly. That's the square box tilted off the back of the tractor. Removal of this box is not possible without undoing all the hydraulic lines. I don't want to remove them because they are tight, leak free and working perfectly. At this point, it's either going to have some dirt and grime up inside the box, or maybe I'll relent and remove the hydraulic lines. The fender mount can't be removed because it's a large 15/16s head, exposed bottom through the casting and rusted in place. With that hydraulic console in the way, there is no way to break it loose. This will probably be the deciding factor with proceeding to remove all the hydraulics. I don't feel comfortable leaving that rust uncleaned and treated. Another poor engineering decision was the foot platforms. The left side will not come off without dropping the supports underneath, meaning it can't be cleaned well unless we do. So again, we'll probably be disassembling further than I would have preferred. Front end is going to have to come off to separate the roll shift axle spindle sections. Work will have to be done in small chucks, painting some parts with all but clear coat, then reassembling and paint others while repainting the parts already hit. The reason is that so much of it is inaccessible assembled, but the front end should be back on before I hit the main part of the tractor for stability/safety. The same will be true of the rear end. I'll pull the rears and paint the finals but then reassemble before painting the rest of the main frame. In keeping with that, either the roll shift front, or the rear rims and finals will get their first coat by the weekend. The 3M Accuspray system is a godsend for doing piecemeal painting like this, since I can mix a container of primer, Persian #2, and Cream, and keep them sealed for the disjointed work involved. After a few times of reuse, the disposable containers start to lock up as paint hardens in the internal filters, but even then, I dump that paint into a new container, thin it slightly and can continue to use it with opening the main can again.

6/8/18: Clean up continued, and I'm happy to say, I finally got the hydraulic control tower off so I can get all the rust. I also want to clean up the piping. What a mess it is compared to the good old Allis' that had it all internal. What I realized was that though the badly rusted bolts were near impossible to reach on this hydraulic box, they cost a few cents apiece, and cutting them off saves a lot of time. One inch carriage bolts aren't difficult to find, they are stock at every hardware store. I took 3 hours to remove them and the realization hit me so I cut the last on off and was done with it. So now I'm behind quite aways... or I'm just an absurdly optimistic estimator.

23:59 06/11/18


20:53 06/12/18


20:53 06/12/18


20:53 06/12/18


20:53 06/12/18

 23:59 06/11/18  Ramping up for painting
I know I have to move this tractor fairly quickly if I'm going to take advantage of the good weather and get on to my D15D (or maybe the D12 or D17, not sure yet). We have it all torn down as far as I want to go for a cosmetic restoration, actually further, but it's a very dirty machine. The Idaho soil mixed with grease has made some layers we've never seen before on a tractor. Many parts I've cleaned so far, had very bright original paint underneath, I don't think this tractor was ever cleaned fully in it's lifetime. I have an array of parts, most of the hitch and business end parts, cleaned and placed in the painting stall. As soon as that's full, I'll start primering while my son finishes working on the main frame.

We have to pull the front end off, because the dirt inside the roll-shift front axle tubes is thick. That tube was full and there was only so much I could get out without disassembly. I also have a lot of work to do straightening the radiator shell. Then there is the welding of the fenders and grill, both in poor condition even though it looked perfect before disassembly. I don't know how people manage to ram the front end of every tractor they have. Knock on wood, I don't do that (though I will confess doing it to the front of my last truck with the backhoe loader :-(). The shell is tweaked and really needs straightening. I'm still optimistic that I can get going on the cosmetics soon. I did get the carb in the ultrasonic tonight, I'm hoping it will look like new. I have a rebuild kit for it, but the internals already look very good. Mostly right now, I'm just slugging through the wire brushing of all the parts and one by one, setting them up for paint. I'll get my son to do the dash and steering gear tomorrow. In the process the steering wheel will come off and we'll start jb-welding the plastic back together, it's completely cracked on this tractor, but the JB-Weld worked beautifully to put the D14 steering wheel back together. Having all that off will set us up for the remaining rewiring. The steering gear needs some machine shop work so that's a priority. I reflected on my "Cosmetic Restoration". It seems that no tractor this old in original condition can be "cosmetically restored". You tear into it and too much pops out that needs mechanical work. My impression is that when a tractor has just been used, even if it looks good, it's tired, and it deserves fixing everything you come across. I won't be doing all the seals and engine rebuild on it, but it's still a lot more than cosmetics. You really can't avoid that without blinding yourself to all the little things that are going to break when you start using it. Kim will actually be using this machine for it's intended purpose. That is what we do with tractors, we don't show them, so there is no way to shortcut the process. I guess I'm thinking of it as a cosmetic restoration, just because I'm not rebuilding the engine.

06/12/18: I shot a photo of the venturi direction just because with some of these carbs, it's possible to put it upside down and still get the halves together. Note to self, this is how it goes together. The carb was very dirty but is cleaning up nicely. You can see in the next photo that with just a little wire brushing, it starts to look new. I'll be painting it in orange so I don't need to get the dark spots brushed. The pinesol-water mix I use to clean them, does leave it a little dark. But the halves are very clean and I'll put the rebuild kit in it tomorrow. Lots of other parts are starting to be stacked in the painting area. When that fills up, I'll prime them all. I'll be doing most of the sheet metal separately so I can spend time and care on getting those pieces nicely glossy and a thicker clear than on the cast and heavy steel pieces. The bottom photo is the front inner weight, very heavy. I went to pick it up thinking it was 90 pounds, no way, way over that. Got a lot done for being a bit preoccupied. I bought my D19 and am quite excited about that. Will be months before I get it unless I can arrange a deal on a C6500 GMC Rollback I'm looking at. My trailer won't haul a D19... even close.

06/19/18: Still plugging along cleaning a few parts each night. I have a nearly full paint bay full of parts to prime so I'll break off and paint most of those soon. I'll take them through the Persian Orange #2 coatings before I stop and start the next batch. The next batch will be the main tractor and the large sheet metal pieces which will require a lot of straightening, welding and time consuming work. I did run into a serious glitch with the steering gear. I can't get the steering wheel off without destroying it. The nut was so rusted that it's smaller than the socket that should fit it, by one whole size. It's a sloppy fit too, so if I use the smaller socket, I'm certain it will round off. I was hoping to salvage this steering wheel, so I'm going to try and disassemble the steering gear without removing it. I'm certain the steering gear will need a trip to the machine shop. The manifold I was going to save is not salvageable. I purchased a new one. Slow going at this stage, every thing I removed seemed to cause additional work, but that is the way it usually goes. You can't estimate the time for a restoration accurately, everything requires three or four times the labor you would expect if the parts were all new.
Return to Journal list

What are Project Journals?

Project Journals are a place where YT Community members can document their tractor and farm projects. Each journal created, can have many photos and accompanying text entries. You can also enable comments to allow other members of the YT Community to comment on your journal. If you do enable comments, it is up to you to moderate what people enter in your journal according to the site policy of Yesterdays Tractors. Journals may also be used as photo posting area, to post your photos of your farm, tractors and related photo topics. If you would like to create a journal, just be sure you are logged in to the Classic View of the forums, and a link will appear to do so when you next come to this page.
.

TRACTOR PARTS TRACTOR MANUALS
Fast Shipping!  Most of our stocked parts ship within 24 hours (M-Th). Expedited shipping available, just call! Most prices for parts and manuals are below our competitors. Compare our super low shipping rates! We have the parts you need to repair your tractor. We are a company you can trust and have generous return policies. Shop Online Today or call our friendly sales staff toll free (800) 853-2651. [ About Us ]

Home  |  Forums


Copyright © 1997-2018 Yesterday's Tractor Co.

All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any part of this website, including design and content, without written permission is strictly prohibited. Trade Marks and Trade Names contained and used in this Website are those of others, and are used in this Website in a descriptive sense to refer to the products of others. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy

TRADEMARK DISCLAIMER: Tradenames and Trademarks referred to within Yesterday's Tractor Co. products and within the Yesterday's Tractor Co. websites are the property of their respective trademark holders. None of these trademark holders are affiliated with Yesterday's Tractor Co., our products, or our website nor are we sponsored by them. John Deere and its logos are the registered trademarks of the John Deere Corporation. Agco, Agco Allis, White, Massey Ferguson and their logos are the registered trademarks of AGCO Corporation. Case, Case-IH, Farmall, International Harvester, New Holland and their logos are registered trademarks of CNH Global N.V.

Yesterday's Tractors - Antique Tractor Headquarters