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ole farmer wrote on Tuesday, March 11, 2003 (PST):
  • i have never considered any of my tractor purchases an "investment", they have always been and will continue to be a hobby and an opportunity to learn about and experience the technology and engineering of our fathers. every tractor and manufacturer used different approaches and techniques to achieve a common goal, to build the best tractor, we will never again see the variety and opportunity that the 20th century provided for agriculture. i am very fortunate to have been a part of it.
    Frank wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • As many have said above, most optional, or non essential spending is cyclical by nature, and will track with economic conditions. The age of the collector and the dwindddling nummber of people with true Ag backgrounds reflects the changing nature of our culture, most dramatic in the last 50 years, as farms have become much larger and noticably fewer. In my own group (Mid Michigan Old Gas Tractor Ass'n. Oakley MI) Our 30 year history has seen a considerable shift in interest away from the more primitive threshing machines and unstyled tractors, to the "classic" era of the 40's and 50's. The membership growth of our group testifies to the fact that the hobby is still thriving in our area. One of the prime motivating factors for us has been our ongoing interest in tractor pulling. We still get plenty of younger guys wanting to join, and most of them do so because of their interest in pulling. At age 58, I still enjoy working at and participating in nearly all of our pulling events. The continued exposure of our kids to this aspect of the hobby over the last 30 years has created a new generation of bodies, enthusiasm, and dollars to perpetuate our hobby and our facilities. A considerable percentage of our pullers are much too young to have ever used an A John Deere or a Farmall M in their heyday, but once exposed, they are just as vulnerable as we were in our younger years to the inherent charms this old hardware has. The bottom line is, if our hobby and our clubs are to survive beyond our active years, they must remain economically viable. If it takes aaa transfer sled and a lot of work to maintain that, then bring on the "hook" !
    Tim Daley wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • Perhaps the trend goes in spurts. I think there will always be a market for the collector, however small it may be. We started two years ago with an Antique Tractor and Farm Machinerey show here where I live in Michigan and the last show doubled its' attendance from the previous year. I noticed many families bringing their children and I watched the younger ones' awe and enthusiam at the marvels of sawing boards and shingles from logs and bagging wheat from an old threshing machine! Give the credit to the parents for not letting them stay home in front of an idiot box or wandering around a mall. I love my 8N Ford want to collect many more. I grew up in Detroit but my mother grew up on a farm. We went to visit granny every other week it seems and I couldn't wait. I loved the country and my brothers and sisters and I would climb my Uncle Pat's tractors and pretend we were farming. Ten years ago I had the chance to move closer to where my grandma's farm was, although she was deceased now, and further from the big city so I took it. I bought me the 8N Ford and am now doing my own farming. I drive it to the local tractor show every fall now.
    CADILLAC RANCH wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • THE PROBLEM I SEE IN OUR AREA IS THERE ARE 2 ANTIQUE CLUBS. THE SECOND ONE FORMED CAUSE THEY COULDN'T GET ALONG WITH THE FIRST. IN BOTH CLUBS, IF YOU'RE NOT "ONE OF THEM" YOU DON'T BELONG, INCLUDING YOUNGER PEOPLE.
    LEE wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • WOW, I AM REALLY GLAD TO SEE THERE ARE JUST AS MANY " PACK RATS & JUNK COLLECTORS" OUT THERE AS ME. THE SUBJECT OF OLD TRACTORS, MAN WHO WOULD THOUGH YEARS AGO WHEN FOLKS HAULED THE " RUST PILE OF SCRAP IRON " TO THE IRON GUY AND RECIEVED A FEW, A VERY FEW , DOLLARS FOR IT THAT IT WOULD EVEN BE WORTH SOMETHING. MAYB, JUST MAYBE THAT IS WHY THEY ARE WORTH SO MUCH TODAY. AS FAR AS A FAD, N0 WAY! THESE OLD TRACTORS ARE A HOBBY AND AN ADICTION YOU CAN PUT ON THE BACK BURNER FOR A TIME AND GO RIGHT BACK TO THEM WIHT RENEWED EXCITMENT. THIS IS THE BACKBONE FOR THE REASON THIS TYPE OF COLLECTING AND INSTREST IS WHAT IT IS. GREAT TO SEE SO MANY KEEPING THESE OLD MACHINES ALIVE. GOOD LUCK TO ALL
    Nathan Klount wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • I am 20 years old and I love the old two-cylinder tractors. I own a 1948 JD G and I plow and mow with it regularly, and take it to shows, etc. My dad got me into the hobby, he has an A. We overhauled both the A and G together and these were good times spent with my dad. I live on a farm and my dad and I farm yet. I too worry about this hobby and how many young people will get into it. I think the only reason I got into it is because of living on a farm and my dad. I had no connection to a JD G whatsoever, I didn't grow up on one, my grandpa was a farmall man, and they aren't very useful on a modern farm ( no 3pt. or live pto.) I guess I liked the sound of my fathers A and knew that the G was the biggest row crop at the time and they didn't make so darn many G's as they did As and Bs. I love my tractor now and want another, this time a diesel 720, 730, 70. etc. I think a little less interest in the hobby wouldn't be all bad though, prices would go down more to reality, it is outrageous what some of these two cylinder tractors are bringing now 10,000 for an 830 diesel. but on the other hand who will keep providing parts for some of this stuff without as many people buying it?
    Sleepless In Seatltle wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • Some of our fellow brothers have let GREED step into the equation just like the word ORGANIC all we did was let false people triple the price of food Some Grandads lived to be 100 and never heard that word. Bring down the price of Antique Tractor and put on more mall shows.Lets go after the young at heart and give FREE TRACTOR RIDES on weekends' it isn't the money we need it's the FRIEDSHIP we need to Build GOD BLESS FREDOM TRACTORS and our Grandchildren
    Sleepless In Seatltle wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • Some of our fellow brothers have let GREED step into the equation just like the word ORGANIC all we did was let false people triple the price of food Some Grandads lived to be 100 and never heard that word. Bring down the price of Antique Tractor and put on more mall shows.Lets go after the young at heart and give FREE TRACTOR RIDES on weekends' it isn't the money we need it's the FRIEDSHIP we need to Build GOD BLESS FREDOM TRACTORS and our Grandchildren
    Sleepless In Seatltle wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • Some of our fellow brothers have let GREED step into the equation just like the word ORGANIC all we did was let false people triple the price of food Some Grandads lived to be 100 and never heard that word. Bring down the price of Antique Tractor and put on more mall shows.Lets go after the young at heart and give FREE TRACTOR RIDES on weekends' it isn't the money we need it's the FRIEDSHIP we need to Build GOD BLESS FREDOM TRACTORS and our Grandchildren
    Wally wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • I'm a young collector, 22 years old, that got started in the hobby about 2 years ago. I finally had enough money to buy a 1940 John Deere Model A. I can tell that I am a "rare breed" just by the fact that every person I know at my age level has nothing to do with antique machinery. Its really sad to me that some young people write off this hobby as being boring and for old timers. I guess my interest grew because I grew up on a farm and loved working with any kind of machinery, old or new. From that I went to college and just received a degree in Agricultural Engineering. So everybody thinks that I am into all this big new machinery. Not so. As an engineer, I am totally fascinated looking at the evolution of tractors and equipment from the past. That is what has really sparked my interest in the hobby. I know one thing, I will collect tractors til the day I die, guaranteed. I wish more young people would be in this hobby. I have had many comments at auctions about the fact that it is so neat to see someone young getting into this stuff. I have actually had people drop out of bidding against me just because they thought it was great to see a young person trying to buy it. This tells you alot about the people in this hobby. I think some of the best people in the world are involved in this. Not putting down any other people, but you know what I mean. All I can say, is I will be in this as long as I'm around , and I do plan to pass it on down to my kids. I look forward to the day when I get on my A with my son on my lap and show him how they used to do it. That, to me, is what this hobby is all about.
    Chris wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • I am only 20 years old. I have been into old tractors since I was very little. I farmed the living room floor for many years and about 5 years ago I bought my first real antique tractor. I worked day and night on it and fixed it up to parade and show. I didn't have a licence so I had to drive it to shows and the eight mile journey to town for the parade was the only thing I thought about all summer long. Now, 5 years later I have bought many more and it is almost like an adiction. Most of the people my age spend alot of time working on cars, trying to impress there friends, I spend my time trying to get that perfect pop to impress the old guys. I would imagine that there are not many like me out there but as long as I'm around there will always be a younger generation of tractor nuts. Even if I'm the only one left. To me, you can't beat driving around on an old tractor, or even just letting it run to here the sound. I grew up driving newer tractors with huge implements, so I don't have any storys about driving the old things when I was younger, but I could set all day and listen to older guys talk about "the good old days". It facinates me to think where all an old tractor has been, and what it has done. To just set and think about that guy with a young boy walking into that dealership, and looking at the new model for 1945, trying to decide wheather that $1000 would be a good investment or not. Now, I usually pay more for a tractor with bad paint and a few problems than they did when it was new. Antique tractors are my reason for getting up in the morning. My friends don't like to drive anywhere with me because when I see a wheel sticking out of a grown up fence row, I have to stop and look. It's like a magnet. I don't know if I will ever meet anybody my age like me, but I will never give up my craving for old iron. So to all of you older guys, I promise as long as I'm around your going to be remembered along with your new for 1940 something tractors.
    kim wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • A lot of this is true, I am 50 and i like to collect what I could not aford when I started farming 32 years ago. I started with allis chalmers and am all john deere now ,but this winter I bought the 2 biggest AC that came out in 69 and 71. a AC 210 and AC 220. We like what we had when we were young.
    Lance Peters wrote on Friday, March 14, 2003 (PST):
  • Alot of you think that the younger generation need to be involved in this hobby. I agree with you, I am 13 years old and my dad and I have 13 tractors. A MM U, 2 MMZ, 2 MM R,MM M670, 3 MCCORMICK DEERING WD-9, AC UNSTYLED WC, CASE LAI, FARMALL F-20, JD D, AND THATS IT I THINK. I am the youngest in my club and I only know of one other person my age that is interested in antique tractors. I also think that old iron prices are slowly decreasing. The first MM I bought the u was $500 now most in the same condition are brining $300-400.
    Rick Sheltrow wrote on Sunday, March 23, 2003 (PST):
  • I can't believe people poke fun at others for collecting tractors. I myself am in a similar situation with my co-workers-especially for being in the hobby at a young age (26). What they can't understand that itis a HOBBY-just they like having hobbies, and if this is what I want to do for fun then so be it. Not to mention have these people forgot that this nation was built by the hard work of these old machines and their owners? Come on-have a little respect for this old stuff. As a side note-I was the only one at work raised on a farm. Everyone else was raised to be a no common sense, couldn't change a tire if they tried, SUV driving yuppie with no respect for anyone or their past.
    Lee wrote on Wednesday, April 02, 2003 (PST):
  • I can't see the old Fords, 9N,2N,8N,NAAs etc. ever fading from popularity. As long as men own a few acres and want a good old workhorse machine to tend it they'll have a place.
    Frank Henderson wrote on Friday, April 11, 2003 (PDT):
  • I kinda hope it is a passing fad, all these wonderful machines are being stored in million dollar garages instead of being put to work, like their intended purpose. It's like rich women buying work horses for a conversation piece. I have an old tractor, but can't afford another because this fad has their value jacked up so that the blue collar worker can't afford them.
    Combine boy wrote on Friday, May 02, 2003 (PDT):
  • If the proces and values on antique Machinery ever went down that would be good for the really loyal collecters , because their hobbie will get cheeper and they will be able to purchase machinery cheeper which means that can have more machingery, Combine boy
    steve Gittelman wrote on Tuesday, May 06, 2003 (PDT):
  • I'm 53 but two years old to this obsession. There have been few things that I have enjoyed as much in my life. I used to collect and restore old clocks. I never made a cent. You'd think I would have some sense given my experience. I do, each tractor adds something special to my life. I expect that they will be a great investment, after all I'm truly investing in my own happiness.
    Doug (OH) wrote on Monday, July 28, 2003 (PDT):
  • I can only tell you why I just my 9n tractor with a 5' brush hog. My wife and I bought some land, including 14 acres of fields with a lot of nasty woody brush. The fields probably hadn't been worked in over 20 years. After paying some guy with a bigger tractor and brush hog to take down these 6 or 7' tall monsters (he broke three pto shafts), I decided I needed something to maintain the field myself now that the hard work was done. My answer was the 9n, which a neighbor was selling because he bought a brand new diesel tractor with a front loader. Is this a trend? People in their 40s buying land to get away to a simpler, heartier life? I want to live there. I want a chicken coop and fresh corn and asparagus. I grew up in the suburbs and had no exposure to farming or country life whatsoever. But I did have a great uncle who was a dairy farmer in Bradford, PA. At the family reunions we'd get to check out the the old barn made of chestnut timbers dragged by horse across the hills almost a hundred years earlier. There were two old tractors in the barn. At the age of 81, my great uncle Walter was still making hay. I know several other "40 somethings" that either are or would love to be in my position. If this is the trend, than the future of the value and use of old iron tractors is bright.
    Michael Morrison wrote on Friday, August 01, 2003 (PDT):
  • With regards to tractors and passing fads, I think that if your in it for money, the market is cyclic.Just like muscle cars were, aviation industry and real estate. money alone is not the measure. Enjoy fixing it up, enjoy driving or using it and pass it on. Besides, if prices drop I can afford to fix up my Farmall A. If your prices drop far enough contact me. I want to enjoy mine.
    K. T. Novak wrote on Wednesday, October 15, 2003 (PDT):
  • As a young collector (19) I have noticed a few things. How the heck did some of you collectors get so lucky with the tractors you have found? My eyes are always peeled when i'm driving through the countyside in seach of my next project. Every so often i come across one that looks like a promising find only to be discouraged when i find out the price tag and to hear "we'll you know thats a collectors piece now". Then I talk to some of my fellow collectors and hear about how they got this tractor for $500 and that one for $400 and how they ran just perfect. Everyone tells me "You should have been born 10 years sooner, there were old tractors for sale all over the place." So the hard thing for my generation is finding a tractor. Now i couldn't be more thankful for those collectors who can notice the difficulties of a young collector and do all they can to asist me. Most of you guys have had the oppertunity to operate these tractors while they were still on the farms doing their thing. This experience is something my generation could only dream of. So if i can give you collectors any words of advice it would be this. Please do all you can to share your knowlege and wisdom with the younger generation. Do all you can to give the younger generation an oppertunity to flurish as collectors. For i belive that this is the way to assure the hobby of old iron, will be around to stay. Just my 2 cents
    Reid from CA wrote on Thursday, November 06, 2003 (PST):
  • I don't believe the tractor collector generation will be confined to the youngsters of today. I am 18 myself and already have 2 tractors. I love the feeling of climbing up on my 100 and 450. Nothing else like it.I couldn't think of a cooler hobby.
    Dave in S MN wrote on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 (PST):
  • I agree with the previous guy. I am 20, 21 in March and love old tractors. When I'm not doing school work I'm thinking about my old machinery hobby. I have a 41 JD B and an early 1960s 42 JD combine. For my next project i want to pull an old thrashing machine and binder out of the pasture and get them going for next year. I also do not see it as a bad thing if prices go down. It would leave more room for young people like us to get more involved with the hobby. Right now I try to obtain things that I know I can get for free or very little. Problem with that is it's usually in really rough shape. Just thought it would be good if another young person added to the comments.
    Steve wrote on Wednesday, November 26, 2003 (PST):
  • I believe that "Antique" is not the word for a piece of machinery that has been around for 40 years and good for 40 or 50 more with or without TLC. I own 3 acres of woods in South Carolina, and I have rented Bobcats, 4wd tractors and a dozer to try to clear and prep the land for my new home. I could get a new Japanese or Chinese compact tractor for 10+K (with implements) and then how long will it last? I feel a lot better about buying an older tractor (bigger) and having it around for years, then one with electronic components and fuel injection, plastic pieces and computer control.That stuff all breaks easily and getting parts is as difficult for a new tractor as an old. Stump pulling, box grading, front loaders, all easy. Only thing is, finding one at a reasonable price is difficult. I guess just keep on looking.
    Gary Mosher wrote on Wednesday, November 26, 2003 (PST):
  • Two comments, one for the younger people and one for the older people. To the younger generation, I am thirty years old and I repaint or restore tractors myself. I have been doing the tractor work for about 3 years. I have done body work on cars sicne I was a teen. This is the most frustrating buisness I have ever been invold in, and I can see why. The older generaton is hard to deal with when it comes to buying tractors. For example, I had the pleasure of hearing alot of buying stories from older collectors buying out of canada, and every story is the same. They buy these tractors rangeing from $400.00 to $1200.00 and now they want $1500.00 to $5000.00 . Were do these prices come from? I am still trying to find the little brown book but have had no luck. So how are the nations tractor clubs going to keep there clubs alive. It seems like the fad is going to die because alot of the collectors are crazy on their prices. And to the older generation, If it wasnt for my grandfather I would not be into tractor restoration at all. (Thank you Grandpa) He told me that if I had the interest that he would show me the way. Have you guys forgot that quote, I think you have and I think I know why, You guys are to worried what that guy has or how many tractors that guy has ect,ect... If you guys want to keep what you have started, open your eyes! get ride of the greed and keep your hobbies and love for old iron alive with the younger generation. Help the younger guys with your knowledge instead of draining there wallets. There is an old saying and it really comes into play here. There is a man with experience and a man with money. The man with experience gets the money, the man with the money got the experience. If thats how you want it your on the right track .
    John S - Tx wrote on Wednesday, December 17, 2003 (PST):
  • I agree with all. Myself being younger than thirty its hard to even get a tractor. I have had to save a year just to purchase an old stuck Case Vac. Trying to find parts has even been harder. When you find the part you need its almost as much as the tractor you just bought. If you want more collectors pricing is your holdback. Look on ebay! An old rotted out and stuck farmall or ford is a blinking fortune.
    GOT wrote on Thursday, June 03, 2004 (PDT):
  • Yes, I believe prices may actually plummet and for two simple reasons; As mentioned, people buy what they remember as a kid (which is why old cars from the 20's don't have the greatest value when compared to a muscle car of the 60's) and, there will be less buyers period. The next generations are far smaller than the boomers so guess what? Supply and demand kicks in. More tractors, cars, lake homes, etc. to less buyers means lower prices. And yes, I think this will hit that rare $180,000 John Deere High Crop as well as the common Farmall H. This mass of population in their 80's or their heirs will be dumping pocessions as they prepare for the nursing homes and graves. Sorry but that's my prediction. If your healthy at 85 you'll find some sweet deals out there - finally!
    sawtooth wrote on Saturday, October 23, 2004 (PDT):
  • Don't think the value has dropped much yet. I'm just home from an auction that included 4 old Farmalls. None in nice shape- rusty but straight tin and lots of leaky gaskets and bad rubber. Inspite of this condition a Super H sold for $2,800, strangely a regular H in similar condition sold for $2,000 less.
    Adam Bronson wrote on Thursday, February 17, 2005 (PST):
  • I am a 17 year old high school student with 11 tractors of my own and a total of 29 between my father and i. I just wanted everyone to know that kids are still in to tractors and old stuff. There are not many kids into this stuff but there is some and we are doing our best to get more involved.
    John Dornik wrote on Sunday, April 03, 2005 (PDT):
  • I have 5 farmall cubs that I have restored. Antique tractors are a tribute to this country. The antique tractors that you see on this site tell future generations of how great this country once was. Look at the machines. They will NEVER build machinery like they did in the 30's, 40's, 50's, and 60's. Absoultely never. Antique tractors, regardless of value, are a statement; An era where American manufacturing and engineering were the best in the world!!!!!!!!
    fshook wrote on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 (PDT):
  • My experience with antique iron goes back when I was a kid we did not live much above survival and when Dad brought home the first WC allis My brother and I had the task of keeping It running.It made our lives better.since then we have seen the world and I made a career out of fixing things and have done well.I had the privlege of working on lowly briggs mower engines to pulling wrenches on the mighty F-15 eagle for the USAF I recently found the case tractors from the 1930s and am mesmorized by the forgotten secrets that we are still using to this very day!Old iron has a lot to teach us about our past and our future. there will always be a following and the monetary value is the very least of the values that We preserve these machines for. Because of My humble start I have a deep respect for the machines that really began to take the phrase "HARD WORK"and separate the two words from each other because face it folks, at the turn of the century farming killed people and made men AND women old way before there time. I feel a duty to the men who invented and built the old iron to preserve it for a generation that is not even born.If We dont who will?
    Lewie wrote on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 (PST):
  • I don't care what everyone else is doing, I grew up in the 50's and I like all the AMERICAN MADE tractors from 1970 and back. At 18 I bought a 1928 John Deere D and sold it when we got married in '71. Bought it back the other day for many times what I sold it for. Let's just keep our shows going & the youger generation will come along. Find the old stuff that is sitting out there rusting away and get it into the hands of someone who will care for it. Don't leave anything for the scrap man except the junk from Japan!!!
    Steve Crum wrote on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 (PST):
  • I watch these trends as closely as possable as being a manufacturer of replacement parts I have a vested interest. Admitedly, I do expect a leveling off of interest. My own 17 year old son has little or no interest in old iron. I'm working along to diversify the functions of my fabrication shop to cushion against this. Sadly aventually I'm afraid, as us old dogs that ran these and remember them as kids die off, There won't be the interest there is now. In the long haul, people who see old iron as investment material and have no sentimental attachment will likely do well to invest elsewhere. Then some old iron will fall into the hands of the people who have a passion for it, and it will be preserved for the future.
    chad wrote on Thursday, May 11, 2006 (PDT):
  • I;m 30, never owned a tractor or ever operated one. I,ve always been a mechanic and somehow the simplicity of my three cubs makes me feel I,m connecting to my heritage. Instead of busting wrenches for a living, I'm doing it for a hobby. By the way, just give $20,000 for a 1930 model A. When asked when I,m going to put a real engine in, I laugh and ask how many years the questioner feels his civic is going to last . thanks,god bless
    russ hamm wrote on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 (PDT):
  • some said this was a passing fad a long time ago and then too there were younger guys that were disappointed. that is good to see. it will never pass. i agree that prices are not a big deal to me (boy would i love a 45 mogul for 500.00!) but i have sold some to fund buying others and i don't think they were out of line. i grew up on an h, w-6 ,460 utility, 706, 806, etc. and i do dearly love them but i collect the older steel wheeled tractors, hand crank and hard riding as they are, and i'm sure when i get older that will be replaced for rubber tires and electric starters. i help thresh at a show and i get told that nobody wants to watch threshing anymore, but as long as there is one person there i don't care, we will keep doing it.( i probably would do it by myself actually if not even one was there )
    russ hamm wrote on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 (PDT):
  • some said this was a passing fad a long time ago and then too there were younger guys that were disappointed. that is good to see. it will never pass. i agree that prices are not a big deal to me (boy would i love a 45 mogul for 500.00!) but i have sold some to fund buying others and i don't think they were out of line. i grew up on an h, w-6 ,460 utility, 706, 806, etc. and i do dearly love them but i collect the older steel wheeled tractors, hand crank and hard riding as they are, and i'm sure when i get older that will be replaced for rubber tires and electric starters. i help thresh at a show and i get told that nobody wants to watch threshing anymore, but as long as there is one person there i don't care, we will keep doing it.( i probably would do it by myself actually if not even one was there )
    shaun wrote on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 (PDT):
  • Well i am part of the younger generation and i know im devoted to agriculture.I have some old iron myself. it fasinates me.There people my age out there that will keep it goin.Dosnt matter if value goes down.Its not about the money its for the love of are past.thanks for readin.
    Brad_bb wrote on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 (PDT):
  • I'm 34. I've been into auto restoration since I was 16. I am just finishing the restoration on the 55 Ford 960 that I use for mowing on the farm. My dad is actually a collector (as opposed to a restorer). He had bought the tractor, but I have gained an affinity for it, particularly because it it useful. The tractor finally had enough things wrong with it and looked so bad that I decided to restore it. I suppose I could have been extremely frugal and only fixed what had to be, but I thought that a full restoration would make mowing a lot more fun and make a few people do a double take. If I didn't have a use for a tractor, then I probably wouldn't restore it. On the same note, I use everything I restore because I think it's a waste to do all that work and just leave it sit under a dustcover. Lastly I also did a cost comparison of the restoration of my 55 Ford vs. a new John Deer riding mower. At $7K for the restoration, it made econimic sense to restore.
    Tony wrote on Tuesday, August 15, 2006 (PDT):
  • I see the tractor market going away in a few years as less and less kids grow up on the farm. Also, with the way I see old tractors being parted out and sold on the internet, there will not be much left to collect to restore. Everyone in this category does not care about keeping the old tractors alive, but making a quick buck. I've seen quite a few restorable, good tractors, being parted out on ebay, which is sad, because these people do not have any connection to farming. How many ads do you see that these non farming profiteers say, "I bought this at an estate sale", but I do not know what it's worth-baloney-these people are just out for a buck-they should let the people who care for these items have them...makes me sick when I see it...It just prices out those of us who are truley interested in preserving the past for our future generations...
    rob rodda wrote on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 (PDT):
  • I m 50 years old and have a Ford 8n, my son is 28 and has a Ford 9n - Figure that one out!!! He s restoring it little by little but continues to use it all year long.
    Andrew Anderson wrote on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 (PDT):
  • I am 15 and am one of only 2 in my school who have the slightest interest in old iron. I was recently a victim of a profiteer who got me on a Farmall H that is turning out to be a lemon. But I still like it. I hope the prices go down but the passion is still there.
    Mike wrote on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 (PDT):
  • As a younger collector 24 , I am one of the youngest collector/restorers in my club. I am not alone however, and even though i m not into pulling, there are several younger faces I see consistently at our events, especially at the pulls. Eventually my generation will straighten up and I think we ll get more interested in our past and preserving the great machines that fed a nation through the years.
    Michael Tashner wrote on Thursday, June 14, 2007 (PDT):
  • They re taking our grandparents farmland and building their developments on them, no matter what the market does with regard to these beautiful old girls, they will be preserved by the shrinking but dedicated group that knows their true value. A priceless piece of our agricultural heritage is always a good investment. We farm with two 69 Ford 5000 s, one with a new engine, and I plan on keeping them up to snuff for as long as I m still around. They re twenty years older than me, but I grew up around one of them, and the other is like an adopted child.
    Robert Pyle wrote on Wednesday, October 31, 2007 (PDT):
  • I grew up on my great grandmother's farm and orchard which were managed by my Dad. We had a 1941 MM ZTS on iron and a 1941 Farmall M, which after WWII, had the rear iron wheels replaced with rubber tires. I know who has the MM, but the Farmall M has disappeared. I have always dreamed of buying some land and farming with old equipment carefully restored including an MM or Farmall M. My memories of the farm and orchard started with the fact we were still using horses and mules to do some of the work. Dad didn't want to stop using them when they could still contribute to both operations, which they did by pulling wagons and we still planted corn with the horses. The vinyard was too narrow for the M&M, but the mules could still pull the small sprayer through without a problem. We used both tractors in both operations as needed; the M&M was used when the Farmall was having preventive maintance done and the Farmall was used with the duster because the M&M didn't have a drawbar big enough to carry it. My hats off to all those who are working to save the old tractors and especially to those who are using them to farm with.
    greenmister wrote on Thursday, March 20, 2008 (PDT):
  • collect what you like and afford, if you make any money when you sel it fine. Remember we just "rent" all this stuff in reality..can't take it with you..so do you really care what someone says its worth? Just enjoy ...!
    greenmister wrote on Thursday, March 20, 2008 (PDT):
  • collect what you like and afford, if you make any money when you sel it fine. Remember we just "rent" all this stuff in reality..can't take it with you..so do you really care what someone says its worth? Just enjoy ...!
    Rev JJ wrote on Thursday, March 20, 2008 (PDT):
  • It could be a moot point on some rare early and steam tractors, as the Europeans are buying stuff up at grossly inflated prices as fast as they can. There may not be much left for the next generation to collect.
    buzz36 wrote on Thursday, March 20, 2008 (PDT):
  • i live in the city niebors think im nuts with old tracotrs in he yard unitl a few years back we had big snow and i saved the day i think there will be a market always for the common engines and tractors but those over a grand will be harder to sell as folks dont have much extra to spend anymore
    gm wrote on Thursday, March 20, 2008 (PDT):
  • Why would you want to say such a thing like -the value has come down this winter-to discourage people from buying?????THe CHEAP ones are JUNK-have you looked at them??? THe GOOD ones are higher-have you tried to buy them??? They will get higher as parts get higher and GOOD ones get more scarce!!! They are quite usable and from what I hear the new ones get HIGHER every year!!!It costs a LOT of money to restore one RIGHT!!!! Do not say they should be bought CHEAPER!!!!
    Glxy500 wrote on Monday, September 01, 2008 (PDT):
  • I personally dont think its a fad at at all, just a hobby and a passion for old living. I myself am a gearhead for automobiles, as my family is as well. My Grandad,Father,Uncles,Cousins are all gear heads, mostly Ford nuts, we have a few that like Chevrolets, they stay behind the barn, hehe. I think alot of the antique tractor "FAD" is old memories. Out of all the Mustangs, Galaxie500's, just old automotive iron in general. Under one end of that old shed is a Farmall Cub, Grandad is 96, still plows a garden every year. On the other end of that barn is an 8N Ford, which he uses to bushog his yard and scrape his driveways. His brothers have cubs also. My Dad has a cub, my Uncle has a cub. I have recently purchased a Super A, and a Cub too. I wanted a Cub for a very long time, I am 41, I wont ever learn all there is to farming, but its fun to sit and talk with My Dad and Grandad about these tractors and gardens. To me its a sentimental feeling. Before all I could do is talk about theirs, now we can talk of all of them. I hope my son has an interest in these tractors as I have, it may come later in life for him, but he will always remember something bout these tractors. One day I hope he will use these. For all you guys that keep these tractors and memories going, I admire you. I know there are tractors out there that are easier to use, but some choose to do it the old way and I like it that way. Those that dig these tractors out of the weeds and restore, or just get em running and use em, I admire those too. Whether I see yours on side of the road, or I see someone elses plowing a garden, it always sends my mind back to that shed where my Grandads Cub is sitting. FAD? I dont think so, just good ol' memories.
    Travis wrote on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 (PST):
  • hi i am 19 and i love tractors my dad has a farmhall cub and a john deere M and i jest got my first farmhall a 1945 A im restoring i went to school last year for small engins 3 out of 25 students liked tractors when i took some of my stuff there most every one called it junk i have over 30 old engins its a shame its our history not jest to be pushed acide we got to be able to do something jest my two cents but to let yous know some yung people stll here to carry flame
    Travis wrote on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 (PST):
  • oh i live in lancaster pa were my grandparents had farm sawmill
    Travis wrote on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 (PST):
  • oh i live in lancaster pa were my grandparents had farm sawmill
    Travis wrote on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 (PST):
  • hi i am 19 and i love tractors my dad has a farmhall cub and a john deere M and i jest got my first farmhall a 1945 A im restoring i went to school last year for small engins 3 out of 25 students liked tractors when i took some of my stuff there most every one called it junk i have over 30 old engins its a shame its our history not jest to be pushed acide we got to be able to do something jest my two cents but to let yous know some yung people stll here to carry flame
    rodney wrote on Tuesday, March 03, 2009 (PST):
  • Hi anyone, Would you know anything about this live steam tractor, it's was a salesman sample?, for Case Tractors a long time ago, any help would be appreciated. It is 41" long and very heavy. Thanks. Rodney.
    Wade wrote on Friday, October 22, 2010 (PDT):
  • I really hope this is not just a passing fad. I'm 16 years old and have a great partnership with my Dad. I started out 3 years ago when i bought a 1941 farmall A and about 7 other antique implements and a Farmall C the collection continues to slowly grow. I live in the country but no of no other kids my age collecting antique tractors. I was lucky that my Dad puts up with my sickness (Tractor Addiction) and that I found a great friend in a older farmer down the road who is thinng out his collection, he has become a amazing friend and has sparked my interest in old tractors.
    JohnDeereJimOhio wrote on Thursday, November 15, 2012 (PST):
  • I think that people will collect tractors for many years. I am just 25 and have been collecting since i was a little tike. My grandfather and father got me in the hobby. Grandpa farmed with jd 70 and farmall m starting out. When the operation got larger they had all the new generation tractors. I have always had a love for old iron and have 5 in my personal collection right now. My father has 6. All are 2 bangers. I would liek to get some new gen's in our collection but need to aquire a set of unstyleds first... I think once youhave the bug of tractors it just sticks with you. I know our sone who is 5 loves tractors just from being around them. There are also a lot of shows and pulls around my part of the country i suppose that helps keep people interested in the hobby.. Again I agree with others I dont care if prices go up or down, it doesnt bother me. I truly love them and am goign to keep buying them till the wife shoots me... You cant beat an old tractor poping off takes me straight back to being a kid with my grandpa and dad driving and using them..
    larry baker wrote on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 (PDT):
  • I believe the market plays on some of this but I do believe also that a lot of folks got into them as an investment and soon became a know it all tractor-man.Most began to try to flip them for profit to folks of the same position and knowledge.It wasnt long till the bunch of them had tractors that weret really what they looked and when someone that really looked picked them apart they began to really slow.Well I know of several that has a good number of lookers that wont run from the truck to the tree that they have large amounts of money in and will never get it back.I still believe good worked and rare examples will stay right up there and the folks that got into the deal just for money and not the hobby will,if they arent already be gone in a little while and it will level out.
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